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Old 04-29-2009, 04:08 PM   #1
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Default what is gyle

Ok i have been doing some reading and studing on different ways to be able carb bottle beer and i ran across something call GYLE it didnt really go into much detail it just gave me a formula. has any one tryed this before and if so how does it affect the taste and carbation of the beer?

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Old 04-29-2009, 04:09 PM   #2
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This is pretty straightforward....

Gyle calc

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Old 04-29-2009, 04:16 PM   #3
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Thx, That is very straight forward!

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Old 04-29-2009, 04:18 PM   #4
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Thx, That is very straight forward!
Yeah it is probably the clearest definition I have ever found in brewing...
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Old 11-22-2009, 02:00 AM   #5
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I've been considering starting to prime with gyle, and came across this thread. Thanks for the link Revvy. Seems too simple to be true, so I did some math and I'd like to get feedback on it.

I'm planning to brew a 6 gallon batch of Rye IPA and save a quart (0.25 gallon) of gyle for priming. According to the Gyle Calc, I need 0.9 quarts. My math to check this is below.

OG: 1.080
Volume of Gyle: 0.25 gallons
Points Per Gallon: 0.020
Fermentability: 75% (guess, but seems reasonable)
Priming Points Per Gallon: 0.015

So, to compare this with a method I have used before, I decided to compare to priming with corn sugar.

IPA Volume of CO2: 2 (per http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html)
Corn Sugar to Prime Batch: 3.7 oz (per http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html)
Corn Sugar Points Per Gallon Per Pound: .046 (per http://www.howtobrew.com/section2/chapter12-4-1.html)
Corn Sugar needed to achieve one gallon of .015 gravity: 5.2 oz

Therefore I'm finding a fairly wide descrepancy between the Gyle Calc and my hand calculations (5.2 oz corn sugar equivalent oz vs. 3.7 oz corn sugar per style guidlines). Any thoughts? Is it because the Gyle calculator doesn't take into accound desired volume of CO2, or is my estimated fermentability somehow off when using to calculate priming doses? Or is my math wrong?

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Old 11-22-2009, 03:47 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by keelanfish View Post
I've been considering starting to prime with gyle, and came across this thread. Thanks for the link Revvy. Seems too simple to be true, so I did some math and I'd like to get feedback on it.

I'm planning to brew a 6 gallon batch of Rye IPA and save a quart (0.25 gallon) of gyle for priming. According to the Gyle Calc, I need 0.9 quarts. My math to check this is below.

OG: 1.080
Volume of Gyle: 0.25 gallons
Points Per Gallon: 0.020
Fermentability: 75% (guess, but seems reasonable)
Priming Points Per Gallon: 0.015

So, to compare this with a method I have used before, I decided to compare to priming with corn sugar.

IPA Volume of CO2: 2 (per http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html)
Corn Sugar to Prime Batch: 3.7 oz (per http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html)
Corn Sugar Points Per Gallon Per Pound: .046 (per http://www.howtobrew.com/section2/chapter12-4-1.html)
Corn Sugar needed to achieve one gallon of .015 gravity: 5.2 oz

Therefore I'm finding a fairly wide descrepancy between the Gyle Calc and my hand calculations (5.2 oz corn sugar equivalent oz vs. 3.7 oz corn sugar per style guidlines). Any thoughts? Is it because the Gyle calculator doesn't take into accound desired volume of CO2, or is my estimated fermentability somehow off when using to calculate priming doses? Or is my math wrong?
I'm far from an expert, but I think the fermentability of your wort is less than 75%. Even DME, which is most likely slightly more fermentable than your wort, only has an apparent attenuation of 65-75%, and real attenuation of 50-60%.
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Old 11-22-2009, 04:12 AM   #7
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Therefore I'm finding a fairly wide descrepancy between the Gyle Calc and my hand calculations (5.2 oz corn sugar equivalent oz vs. 3.7 oz corn sugar per style guidlines). Any thoughts? Is it because the Gyle calculator doesn't take into accound desired volume of CO2, or is my estimated fermentability somehow off when using to calculate priming doses? Or is my math wrong?
The difference you are seeing is from the fact that the gyle calculator assumes 0 volumes of residual co2 remaining in solution post fermentation while the Tastybrew calculator correctly takes residual co2 into account.

Reality is that you would want to reduce the amount of gyle appropriately based on fermentation temp to account for residual co2.
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Old 11-22-2009, 04:20 AM   #8
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I'm far from an expert, but I think the fermentability of your wort is less than 75%. Even DME, which is most likely slightly more fermentable than your wort, only has an apparent attenuation of 65-75%, and real attenuation of 50-60%.
Fortunately with the gyle calculation this is not a guessing game. You will know the exact fermentability of your wort because you will have the fermented beer to use to determine it. The gyle will have the same fermentability as the beer.
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Old 11-22-2009, 02:51 PM   #9
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The difference you are seeing is from the fact that the gyle calculator assumes 0 volumes of residual co2 remaining in solution post fermentation while the Tastybrew calculator correctly takes residual co2 into account.

Reality is that you would want to reduce the amount of gyle appropriately based on fermentation temp to account for residual co2.
That's a good point. Additionally, it doesn't calculate based on desired level of carbonation per style guidelines. I think I'm going to stick with my hand calculations and see how it turns out. Thanks for the input.
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