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-   -   what does unready bottled beer taste like (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/what-does-unready-bottled-beer-taste-like-391486/)

baseballgary 02-20-2013 12:31 AM

what does unready bottled beer taste like
 
Silly question but my bottled beer has been in my basement for a month I taste it and it is a little flat and tasteless. Just wondering if it's spoiled or just not ready. It tasted really good before bottling, now not so much. Anybody offer any advice on the difference between spoiled beer and unready beer.

Yooper 02-20-2013 12:33 AM

If it's flat, it could be due to the cool temperature in the basement. I'd try a warmer place if possible.

Revvy 02-20-2013 12:36 AM

If it's in your basement then no wonder it's not carbed and conditioned. I doubt it's above 70 degrees down there. You need the beer in the warmth for at least 3 weeks for carbonation and conditioing to take hold.

The taste of green beer is really any taste that doesn't taste like you feel it should, barring an infection whic would turn the beer sour, or oxydized which would give it a liquid cardboad taste, or nail polish which is usually from an infection.

In terms of "green beer" some describe beer that isn't ready as having a cidery taste, some describe a green apple taste, some just lifeless flavor, some say there's no hop character (which does pop once the beer is conditioned.) There's a lot of variables, but usually it just boils down to the beer doesn't taste like you're expecting it to taste....Like the beer you're used to.

Cyclman 02-20-2013 03:54 AM

Beer rewards patience, just give it time. I think of green beer as one that just doesn't have balanced flavors (yet). What kind of beer did you brew? Some beers are by their nature not very flavorful.

baseballgary 02-20-2013 11:58 AM

Green Beer Reply
 
I have a stout, a bock and a brown ale that have been sitting in the basement for 5-6 weeks. There is very low carbination in the beer so the previous post hit it on the head I think. I live in Ohio in a old home with a cold dark basement where the beer is stored. Its well below 55 degrees down there during the winter. I didnt realize the cooler temps would have such an affect on the carbination and maturity of the beer. I also didnt want to wait another 5-6 weeks to find out I made faulty beer. Thanks for all the help. This forum is great for beginners.

unionrdr 02-20-2013 12:11 PM

Yup,same her. Too cold in Ohio to carb & condition in the basement. Not even on the first floor. I put mine in the Master Bedroom,warmest room in the house. but it's big enough for the boxes to stay out of the way on my side of the room. Move them to a room that stays warm day & night.

houle 02-20-2013 12:23 PM

I also live in ohio, I am brewing my first batch this weekend. Should I not store my primary fermenter in the basement? I have been monitoring the temperature and it had been around 68-70 degrees. I was thinking this should be fine, but want to make sure since this is my first batch. Thanks..

unionrdr 02-20-2013 12:30 PM

Closer to 68 would be better,so the fermenter would be ok down there. I had to keep the ol' man cave on the chilly side the last week+ so that the WL029 yeast could stay in it's 65-69F temp range during initial fermentation. This is the time when off flavors from by products are produced. Bottled beer needs temps steadily at or above 70F for 3-4 weeks on average.

dm1217 02-20-2013 12:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by houle (Post 4923720)
I also live in ohio, I am brewing my first batch this weekend. Should I not store my primary fermenter in the basement? I have been monitoring the temperature and it had been around 68-70 degrees. I was thinking this should be fine, but want to make sure since this is my first batch. Thanks..


Look at the ideal temp range for the yeast you're using, and chances are that's on the high end. 60F range would be better (especially when taking into consideration the small temp increase generated from active fermentation) I've read numberous times from the experienced brewers here that the lower end of the ideal range produces cleaner tasting beer.

unionrdr 02-20-2013 12:45 PM

60F isn't an ideal temp for all ale yeasts. Cooper's ale yeast,Munton's,& the WL029 go dormant at 60F. There are others as well that can't go that low. But some do,like US-05. So it depends on the yeast as to what "low end" is precisely.


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