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Old 10-26-2011, 09:30 PM   #11
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10° L. This unique product has a sweet berry-nut flavor. Used at a rate of 4-15% to add a deep golden hue, light caramel flavors, and a creamy, satiny finish.

15% of what?
That description sounds like Golden Naked Oats. I have no idea if that is malted or an unmalted oat adjunct or if you need to convert it with basemalt like you would with regular flaked oats.
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Old 10-26-2011, 09:33 PM   #12
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Took me awhile but I broke down what you've said here but I'm not finding where you got the "6#, 8#, and 1#"
You said 6# of LME. But he calculated that 6 pounds of LME is roughly equivalent to 8# of grain.

A better way to think of it instead of "percentage of grainbill" is to consider "percentage of fermentables", in my opinion.

Sometimes (rarely), I use sugar in my beer. That's not a grain, but it's calculated as a percentage of my fermentables.

Say, something like this:

85% two row
10% crystal malt 10L
5% corn sugar

It's common to give the amounts in percentages, instead of pounds and ounces, because then my recipe doesn't have to be converted from someone else's based on their efficiency. I mean, 85% is always 85%, so it's often much easier when talking about recipes to do it in percentages.
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Old 10-26-2011, 09:40 PM   #13
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You said 6# of LME. But he calculated that 6 pounds of LME is roughly equivalent to 8# of grain.

A better way to think of it instead of "percentage of grainbill" is to consider "percentage of fermentables", in my opinion.

Sometimes (rarely), I use sugar in my beer. That's not a grain, but it's calculated as a percentage of my fermentables.

Say, something like this:

85% two row
10% crystal malt 10L
5% corn sugar

It's common to give the amounts in percentages, instead of pounds and ounces, because then my recipe doesn't have to be converted from someone else's based on their efficiency. I mean, 85% is always 85%, so it's often much easier when talking about recipes to do it in percentages.
I said "6 lbs" is that was the numerical symbol is used for in this instance (#)?

AHHHHHH percentage of fermentables, NOW I get it haha. Jesus you guys are crazy. You've wrote your own language when you didn't need to lol.

Forgive me, I'm very new and I'm probably rushing myself into knowing everything but it's how I am lol.
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Old 10-26-2011, 09:51 PM   #14
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Here is my exact plan: I believe it'll be considered a partial mash to you guys

Heat up 2 gallons(or more maybe?) of water to 158, put 2 lbs of British golden promise grain (crushed) in a grain bag and let it rest in the pot while maintaining the temperature for 60 minutes.

Heat up a second pot of water, one gallon worth, and sparge (to pour water through the lifted sack of grain) into the pot of wort.

After the sparge, add 6lbs of Gold Malt Syrup and bring to a boil while stirring in the mixture.

Once the boil is reached, add a quarter of an ounce of Mt. hood hops, after 30 minutes add half an oz of Mt. Hood, and then another quarter at the last 10 minutes of the boil (at this point I had planned on adding about 1.5 lbs of wild flower honey, I need input on this decision), and irish moss.

After the boil is over, chill the wort to proper temp, move to primary and pitch yeast and dry hop 1 oz of Amarillo hops, and then fermentation, secondary, prime, and bottle process.

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Old 10-26-2011, 09:54 PM   #15
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You've wrote your own language when you didn't need to lol.
You haven't read the manual?
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Old 10-26-2011, 10:02 PM   #16
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I said "6 lbs" is that was the numerical symbol is used for in this instance (#)?
Awww, c'mon. Don't you kids have cellphones these days? You know, when you get instructions to "press the pound key", the symbol is #.


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Originally Posted by smallkiller View Post
Here is my exact plan: I believe it'll be considered a partial mash to you guys

Heat up 2 gallons(or more maybe?) of water to 158, put 2 lbs of British golden promise grain (crushed) in a grain bag and let it rest in the pot while maintaining the temperature for 60 minutes.

Heat up a second pot of water, one gallon worth, and sparge (to pour water through the lifted sack of grain) into the pot of wort.

After the sparge, add 6lbs of Gold Malt Syrup and bring to a boil while stirring in the mixture.

Once the boil is reached, add a quarter of an ounce of Mt. hood hops, after 30 minutes add half an oz of Mt. Hood, and then another quarter at the last 10 minutes of the boil (at this point I had planned on adding about 1.5 lbs of wild flower honey, I need input on this decision), and irish moss.

After the boil is over, chill the wort to proper temp, move to primary and pitch yeast and dry hop 1 oz of Amarillo hops, and then fermentation, secondary, prime, and bottle process.
I don't like your plan!

Sorry but start at the beginning. If you have two pounds of malt, you want to mash it properly right at the start. That will require 1.25-2 quarts of water per pound of grain. I use 1.5 quarts of water per pound of grain for my system, but the range of 1.25-2 quarts per pound is fine.

So.......START with 3 quarts of water total for 2 pounds of grain. That's the first thing. You want conversion, which requires precise amounts of water and time and temperature.

If you want to mash at 150-156 (that's a fine range), you'll need the water to be a little warmer to start, usually about 10 degrees above the desired mash temp. So start with 3 quarts of 164 degree water- that will put you right in the range. Mash for 60 minutes.

You got the sparge exactly right! Pour 170 degree water over your grainbag until you reach your boil volume.

The rest of your plan looks good. I'd consider adding 1/2 of the gold LME at the end of the boil, when you're planning on adding the honey.

Your hopping is weird, though. .25 ounces of hops at 60 minutes is not enough, and then a half ounce at 30 minutes is pretty useless. I'd change that up, and hop with the proper amount of bittering hops right at 60 minutes.

You don't want to dryhop now, though. Dryhopping is done after fermentation is over, about 7 days before the beer is packaged. It'd be really weird to dryhop that particular recipe, though, as you're using only bittering hops and not flavor and aroma hops, and amarillo would be very weird in that recipe in my opinion!
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Old 10-26-2011, 10:09 PM   #17
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Awww, c'mon. Don't you kids have cellphones these days? You know, when you get instructions to "press the pound key", the symbol is #.




I don't like your plan!

Sorry but start at the beginning. If you have two pounds of malt, you want to mash it properly right at the start. That will require 1.25-2 quarts of water per pound of grain. I use 1.5 quarts of water per pound of grain for my system, but the range of 1.25-2 quarts per pound is fine.

So.......START with 3 quarts of water total for 2 pounds of grain. That's the first thing. You want conversion, which requires precise amounts of water and time and temperature.

If you want to mash at 150-156 (that's a fine range), you'll need the water to be a little warmer to start, usually about 10 degrees above the desired mash temp. So start with 3 quarts of 164 degree water- that will put you right in the range. Mash for 60 minutes.

You got the sparge exactly right! Pour 170 degree water over your grainbag until you reach your boil volume.

The rest of your plan looks good. I'd consider adding 1/2 of the gold LME at the end of the boil, when you're planning on adding the honey.

Your hopping is weird, though. .25 ounces of hops at 60 minutes is not enough, and then a half ounce at 30 minutes is pretty useless. I'd change that up, and hop with the proper amount of bittering hops right at 60 minutes.

You don't want to dryhop now, though. Dryhopping is done after fermentation is over, about 7 days before the beer is packaged. It'd be really weird to dryhop that particular recipe, though, as you're using only bittering hops and not flavor and aroma hops, and amarillo would be very weird in that recipe in my opinion!
I've never had someone I called a hero before but you may be my first haha. I see where you're coming from the extra heat to buffer the loss at the addition of the grains.

So if I want to use the honey I ought to cut my malt amount in half?

I'm very picky about bitterness, I'd so rather there to be more maltiness or sweetness than bitter/sourness. So do the entire oz at the start of the timer? I did that little method you don't like with a light domestic and it was actually really popular with everybody! It was hoppy without messing up the light maltiness.

I'll probably skip dry hopping this time, I'm already experimenting enough I think.
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Old 10-26-2011, 10:14 PM   #18
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I've never had someone I called a hero before but you may be my first haha. I see where you're coming from the extra heat to buffer the loss at the addition of the grains.

So if I want to use the honey I ought to cut my malt amount in half?

I'm very picky about bitterness, I'd so rather there to be more maltiness or sweetness than bitter/sourness. So do the entire oz at the start of the timer? I did that little method you don't like with a light domestic and it was actually really popular with everybody! It was hoppy without messing up the light maltiness.

I'll probably skip dry hopping this time, I'm already experimenting enough I think.
If you post your whole recipe, we can look at it and tell you if you should cut the honey down, increase the bittering hops, etc. It's hard to guess without seeing the whole picture!
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Old 10-26-2011, 10:17 PM   #19
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You haven't read the manual?
I've read several and non have prepared me for the actual world LOL. It's like high school
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Old 10-26-2011, 10:18 PM   #20
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If you post your whole recipe, we can look at it and tell you if you should cut the honey down, increase the bittering hops, etc. It's hard to guess without seeing the whole picture!
Haaha, that was pretty much it my friend. I'm not adding anymore than that
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