*Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway - Enter Now!*

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > What does "Dry" mean?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-13-2014, 04:46 AM   #1
jekeane
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 607
Liked 95 Times on 67 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default What does "Dry" mean?

BJCP Saison excerpt:
Overall Impression: A refreshing, medium to strong fruity/spicy ale with a distinctive yellow-orange color, highly carbonated, well hopped, and dry with a quenching acidity.

I brewed a Sweet Potato Saison for an "Iron Chef" mystery ingredient competition. The result was a beer with OG 1.070 FG 1.011 7.75% ABV. I have pretty limited experience with Saisons and no experience with competitions so I am trying to compare my product to the BJCP guidelines.

How does one judge dryness in a beer? What are some commercial examples of a dry beer?

__________________

Fermenter 1: this
Fermenter 2: makes
Fermenter 3: me
Fermenter 4: sad

On Deck: 10/12 Post Road Clone

Kegs:
American Amber
Dark "Cherry" Tower Graf
Session Belgian Pale Ale (Saccharomyces)
Brandon O's Graff
Rye Bourbon Oak Porter
Good Measure(Raspberry Jalapeño Wheat)

jekeane is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2014, 05:31 AM   #2
dudius
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Big Rapids, MI
Posts: 524
Liked 62 Times on 50 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

It should have a drying effect on the tongue and palate. This can come from acidity, alcohol, and carbonation. For me, good saisons leave my mouth dry after a bit, like Sprite. Refreshing, but makes you want another taste.

__________________

Check out my beer blog http://indiebeerdrinker.blogspot.com/

dudius is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2014, 11:07 AM   #3
Smellyglove
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 579
Liked 35 Times on 34 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

It's sort of, well dry.. It just dissapears in your mouth leaving only taste behind. Low viscosity. It's sort of being dehydrated, it gives some "resistance" in your mouth. things just doesn't feel as "slick".

Hard to descibe, sort of like describing a sound to a deaf person.

Try a Saison without a big portion of wheat in it.

__________________
Smellyglove is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2014, 11:09 AM   #4
myelo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 84
Liked 71 Times on 26 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Also I think a low level of sugars/sweetness contributes a lot to dryness. So that would mean a high level of attenuation (low final gravity) so the yeast has fermented out most of the sugars.

__________________
myelo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2014, 11:51 AM   #5
zachattack
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: , MA
Posts: 2,477
Liked 242 Times on 208 Posts
Likes Given: 125

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by myelo View Post
Also I think a low level of sugars/sweetness contributes a lot to dryness. So that would mean a high level of attenuation (low final gravity) so the yeast has fermented out most of the sugars.
This is how I usually define it. Dry is just the absence of any sweetness, but IMO separate from bitterness or acidity. It means a low FG or lack of perceived sweetness.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dryness_%28taste%29
__________________
zachattack is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2014, 11:52 AM   #6
KepowOb
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 460
Liked 51 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 53

Default

^ +1

If you don't have a well attenuated beer, I dint think it'll come across as dry. A lot of people add simple sugars to beers that they want to be dry (from what I've seen in various recipes anyway).

If your unsure what e mean by dry still, go find a really dry wine, I find it more pronounced in wines (maybe I'm just drinking the wrong beers :P).

__________________
KepowOb is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2014, 12:04 PM   #7
Smellyglove
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 579
Liked 35 Times on 34 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zachattack View Post
This is how I usually define it. Dry is just the absence of any sweetness, but IMO separate from bitterness or acidity. It means a low FG or lack of perceiveds sweetness.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dryness_%28taste%29
I'd actually define it as absence of vicosity. If you mash high for a less unfermentable wort, those dextrines left in the wort doesn't necessarily taste sweet, but gives some mouthfeel. A dry beer doesn't give you this mouthfeel.
__________________
Smellyglove is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2014, 12:13 PM   #8
zachattack
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: , MA
Posts: 2,477
Liked 242 Times on 208 Posts
Likes Given: 125

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smellyglove View Post
I'd actually define it as absence of vicosity. If you mash high for a less unfermentable wort, those dextrines left in the wort doesn't necessarily taste sweet, but gives some mouthfeel. A dry beer doesn't give you this mouthfeel.
That sounds reasonable to me
__________________
zachattack is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2014, 12:40 PM   #9
gratus fermentatio
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Montana
Posts: 8,778
Liked 802 Times on 559 Posts
Likes Given: 2157

Default

http://www.winespectator.com/drvinny/show/id/49395
__________________
gratus fermentatio is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-13-2014, 01:28 PM   #10
jekeane
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 607
Liked 95 Times on 67 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

Hmm thanks for all the insights. Dryness is tough for me to discern with all the fruity and spicy flavors in this beer. I am within the FG range for style so I guess I can rely on that as some evidence of dryness.

__________________

Fermenter 1: this
Fermenter 2: makes
Fermenter 3: me
Fermenter 4: sad

On Deck: 10/12 Post Road Clone

Kegs:
American Amber
Dark "Cherry" Tower Graf
Session Belgian Pale Ale (Saccharomyces)
Brandon O's Graff
Rye Bourbon Oak Porter
Good Measure(Raspberry Jalapeño Wheat)

jekeane is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New York Tri clover parts FS 1/2"-3/4" clamps, 2"MPTx2.5" TC adapter, 2.5" gaskets, & 3" valve WPStrassburg For Sale 0 01-05-2014 04:18 AM
Such a thing as "Black Friday" or "cyber Monday" for homebrew supply? StusBrew General Beer Discussion 37 11-29-2013 11:07 PM
"American" or "Imperial" Oatmeal Stout Recipe: Critiques please! cladinshadows Recipes/Ingredients 4 01-04-2012 10:21 PM
Taking my winemaking skills from "cook" to "chef" levels. JasontheBeaver Wine Making Forum 5 07-28-2011 07:49 PM
"Researchers find "alarming" decline in bumblebees" (as well as honeybees) minsco1 Mead Forum 5 01-07-2011 06:28 PM