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Old 04-12-2013, 03:17 PM   #1
hoopdogg315
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Default Week 1 Down, 2 to go...

Until bottling day for my first batch. This first 3 weeks is killer!!!!!



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Old 04-12-2013, 03:22 PM   #2
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Brew more. Get a pipeline going. It reduces anxiety. I try to brew at least one batch every weekend, so I'm constantly getting new beers and I sometimes forget what I have fermenting. This also helps you get more of a variety too.



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Old 04-12-2013, 03:23 PM   #3
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Until bottling day for my first batch. This first 3 weeks is killer!!!!!
Haha you know there are another 3-4 weeks after you bottle right?

Be patient, pick up some craft brew to research your next batch.
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Old 04-12-2013, 03:29 PM   #4
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Haha you know there are another 3-4 weeks after you bottle right?
It doesn't have to take that long unless you're conditioning at really cool temps. I stick a few bottles by my baseboard heat and am drinking fully carbed beer in a week or less.
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Old 04-12-2013, 03:33 PM   #5
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yeah i know i got another 3-4 after this.

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Old 04-12-2013, 03:37 PM   #6
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It's true. When you first start the patience thing is very difficult.

Within 6 months or so you'll switch to... "Damn! I have to bottle. AGAIN?" or "Is it already time to move that to secondary?"

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Old 04-12-2013, 03:38 PM   #7
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It doesn't have to take that long unless you're conditioning at really cool temps. I stick a few bottles by my baseboard heat and am drinking fully carbed beer in a week or less.
Sure, but carbing at 70 won't produce off flavor. Patience goes far.

By that same school of thought. Putting your carboy in front of your heater or ramping a brew belt up to 90 will finish fermentation in 1 week instead of 3.
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Old 04-12-2013, 03:41 PM   #8
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It's true. When you first start the patience thing is very difficult.

Within 6 months or so you'll switch to... "Damn! I have to bottle. AGAIN?" or "Is it already time to move that to secondary?"
With a full pipeline I sometimes feel like this. Especially if it's a recipe I'm not super excited about. If I know it won't hurt, I put stuff off, etc.
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Old 04-12-2013, 03:57 PM   #9
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Sure, but carbing at 70 won't produce off flavor. Patience goes far.

By that same school of thought. Putting your carboy in front of your heater or ramping a brew belt up to 90 will finish fermentation in 1 week instead of 3.
Bottle conditioning at higher temps will not cause off flavors. Almost every Belgian brewery has a hot room, often at 80° or above, that they bottle condition their premium beers in with no problems. I am a fanatic about temp control during critical stages of the brewing process and I let every batch do its thing for at least three weeks. It just isn't necessary to wait for good bottle conditioned beer. The reason I leave it in the primary so long is so I DON'T have to wait once it's in the bottle! Cheers!
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"I cant handle that buddy.. it tastes like Moose Piss", (IPA) - side note.. ive never had moose piss, but im sure it doesnt taste like IPA or I would have a moose.
Bottled: Grizzly Saison, Grizzly Brett, Session Pale, Colorado Cream Ale, Cranberry Apfelwein
Primary: -37* Blue Balls Baltic Porter, Bad Dog Brown, Bohemian Pilsner
Secondary: Rarely!!!
Future: Cognitive Dissonance Cascadian Dark Ale
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Old 04-12-2013, 04:10 PM   #10
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Bottle conditioning at higher temps will not cause off flavors. Almost every Belgian brewery has a hot room, often at 80° or above, that they bottle condition their premium beers in with no problems. I am a fanatic about temp control during critical stages of the brewing process and I let every batch do its thing for at least three weeks. It just isn't necessary to wait for good bottle conditioned beer. The reason I leave it in the primary so long is so I DON'T have to wait once it's in the bottle! Cheers!
While I understand the idea here. You can't really use Belgian beer or breweries as a general example of how to make beer. I guess this is my point more than anything.

Most strains of Belgian yeast have long ago become mutated to be tolerant of higher temperatures both in fermentation and conditioning. It's not uncommon for a saison for example to be fermented at 95 degrees. The characteristic the yeast creates at this temperature is unmistakable and very undesirable in anything but a Belgian beer.

When you are bottle conditioning you are essentially starting a second round of fermentation, it's a small scale operation sure, But still fermenting fresh sugars. So temperatures do matter, yeast doesn't have some timeline of when they ferment comfortably at 65 and then all of a sudden they don't mind fermenting at 90. Drop some us05 in a bottle of malt kept at 65, and one at 90, taste them after a few days and tell me there isn't a difference.

I'm not against bringing a 6er out and putting it at a higher temp to carb faster, but at the same time there is a clear difference between that 6er and the other 42 or so bottles.


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