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Old 10-04-2008, 06:15 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Whisler85 View Post
i HAVE tried letting beers ferment in the carboy longer. After having this problem with early brews, i 1.left my chocolate-oatmeal stout in the primary for two weeks, and in the secondary for more than a month! i used wyeast irish ale, and kept it at 68-70 degrees for good attenuation, but 2.two weeks after bottling, it has way to much pressure and way too much head. I have the feeling that incomplete fermentations are my problem. Could it be that my temperature control is bad? Could it be a problem with extract brewing?
1. kudos on waiting this long. As long as you can verify that fermentation has stopped by using a hydrometer then you are on the right track.
2. 2 weeks after bottling is TOO SOON. Leave them in bottles for at least 3 weeks at around 70 degrees and THEN leave them in the fridge for at least a week. Due to my public school education i can't explain the chemistry (i'm sure someone here can) but the colder temps in the fridge help the beer absorb the CO2 and makes for smaller bubbles, better head and generally better beer.

.
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Old 10-04-2008, 06:43 PM   #12
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... an oz is an 1/8 of a cup right? so 5/8 cups for 5 gallons is good? SRY the last post is a bit confusing

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Old 10-04-2008, 06:47 PM   #13
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Get a scale! They're cheap. then an oz is an oz.

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Old 10-04-2008, 06:57 PM   #14
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you said that 1 oz/gal or 3/4 cup/gal was misunderstood? how so?

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Old 10-04-2008, 07:36 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by jrakich87 View Post
you said that 1 oz/gal or 3/4 cup/gal was misunderstood? how so?

Actually its 3/4 cup per 5gallon, looks like you misunderstood too.

The actual amount varies by style, if you don't care about style then the 1oz per gallon or 3/4 cup per 5 gallons is fine. If you want to prime it for style, then use this:

The Beer Recipator - Carbonation
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Old 10-04-2008, 07:50 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whisler85 View Post
i HAVE tried letting beers ferment in the carboy longer. After having this problem with early brews, i left my chocolate-oatmeal stout in the primary for two weeks, and in the secondary for more than a month! i used wyeast irish ale, and kept it at 68-70 degrees for good attenuation, but two weeks after bottling, it has way to much pressure and way too much head. I have the feeling that incomplete fermentations are my problem. Could it be that my temperature control is bad? Could it be a problem with extract brewing?
Quote:
Originally Posted by bearkluttz View Post
1. kudos on waiting this long. As long as you can verify that fermentation has stopped by using a hydrometer then you are on the right track.
2. 2 weeks after bottling is TOO SOON. Leave them in bottles for at least 3 weeks at around 70 degrees and THEN leave them in the fridge for at least a week. Due to my public school education i can't explain the chemistry (i'm sure someone here can) but the colder temps in the fridge help the beer absorb the CO2 and makes for smaller bubbles, better head and generally better beer.

check this out.
...aw
you beat me to it.

This movie should be in a sticky somewhere
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Burrrrrrrrppppp. <---PBR

BUuUuUUuUURRrrRpppPpPhhPhphph. <----homebrew
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Old 10-04-2008, 08:10 PM   #17
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ok, that calculator told me to use only 3.52 oz.... nowhere near 3/4 cup... is that the accurate measurement for me? I didn't fully understand the "desired volume of CO2" slot but just put the amount (2.2) that it said for amber ale.

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Old 10-04-2008, 11:13 PM   #18
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Yes and No, what it shows is that an American Amber should have between 2.2 and 2.8 volumes of c02. So you choose your desired amount, ie 2.5, and it will tell you how many oz of sugar to use. So in your case, you could use anywhere from 3.5 ish to 5.25 ish oz of sugar and be within style guidelines.

SO if you have been using 3/4 cup or 5 oz of sugar in the past and it is giving you too much carbonation, then you could use this to alter the amount while still being to style.

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Old 10-04-2008, 11:24 PM   #19
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+1 on measuring by weight rather than volume. 3/4 cup of sugar isn't always the same 3/4 cup each time. It can pack down or be looser in the cup. Weight is always the same.

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Old 10-04-2008, 11:38 PM   #20
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+1 on measuring by weight rather than volume. 3/4 cup of sugar isn't always the same 3/4 cup each time. It can pack down or be looser in the cup. Weight is always the same.
Well said. Always go by weight and not volume. You can pick up an Ecko kitchen scale at Wal-Mart for less than $10 so price isn't really a barrier on this one.
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