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Old 12-09-2012, 01:20 AM   #1
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Default Water Chemistry. Mash & Sparge?

Quick question guys.

So I'm doing my first all grain batch tomorrow (west coast style IPA).

I'm using Beertools Pro and have matched a good IPA water profile with the following:

2.5 Gal Tap Water
5 Gal Distilled water
13 g Gypsum
2 g Ca Chloride

My question is this: The total amount of water (7.5 gal) is only for my mash. Do I need to do anything to my sparge water? What type of water should I use to sparge, tap or distilled?

Any info would be appreciated, especially someone familair with beer tools. Thanks!

Edit: This water/mineral combo puts me at the following in case you're curious:

Ca: 138
Mg: 5
Na: 12
HCo3: 80
So4: 261
Cl: 46
HDNS: 366

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Old 12-09-2012, 01:24 AM   #2
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Your going toooo deep on first grain batch. Dont worry about ph, maintain spring water for all parts on this batch. Then later worry about ph and you wont have to ask, youll know.

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Old 12-09-2012, 01:30 AM   #3
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That seems ok, but I'd go lower on the sulfate for the first time. I dislike beers with more than about 100 ppm sulfate, and while you may prefer more you can save that for next time. I'd probably cut the CaS04 in half.

I don't understand the HDNS- is that hardness?

Your mash pH could be very high if you have a very high level of bicarb.

I sparge with 100% RO water. You want low alkalinity for your sparge water.

You can treat all of your water the same, but check the alkalinity of the water.

Have you tried using EZ water or brunwater? I prefer Bru'nwater, but there is a bit of a learning curve with it! Brunwater has a sparge water calculator to help you acidity your sparge water appropriately, so it would be very useful for you I think.

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Old 12-09-2012, 01:34 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
That seems ok, but I'd go lower on the sulfate for the first time. I dislike beers with more than about 100 ppm sulfate, and while you may prefer more you can save that for next time. I'd probably cut the CaS04 in half.

I don't understand the HDNS- is that hardness?

Your mash pH could be very high if you have a very high level of bicarb.

I sparge with 100% RO water. You want low alkalinity for your sparge water.

You can treat all of your water the same, but check the alkalinity of the water.

Have you tried using EZ water or brunwater? I prefer Bru'nwater, but there is a bit of a learning curve with it! Brunwater has a sparge water calculator to help you acidity your sparge water appropriately, so it would be very useful for you I think.
Yeah I'm assuming that is Hardness.

According to the calculator in Beer Tools the mash will be 5.7

I'll look into your other suggestions, thanks Yooper!
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Old 12-09-2012, 01:53 AM   #5
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First off, as your first all grain, don't get too overwhelmed with water chemistry. You will still make an awesome beer if you pay no mind to the water. But as you are interested I will pass on what I just learned about this.

From reading in Gordon Strong's -Brewing better beer- A high ph in sparge water will pull out tannins. The gypsum will only lower the ph in the mash reacting with the phosphates in the grain so use it there. Gypsum in sparge water doesn't do much in the way of dropping the ph. Adding 1/4 tsp of phosphoric acid to 5 gallons of water will lower a 6.7 ph to 5.7 ph. Sparge water is best at 5.8 or lower (a good aim is 5.5)

If you have a way to measure ph great, then adjust as needed. If not, no worries you will be fine. so to answer you question, distilled or tap water... measure ph of both and go with whichever is closer to 5.5 or I would use the distilled if you already have it one hand...

Again, have fun with it either way and good luck on your first all grain!

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Old 12-09-2012, 02:17 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harvestsmiles View Post
First off, as your first all grain, don't get too overwhelmed with water chemistry. You will still make an awesome beer if you pay no mind to the water. But as you are interested I will pass on what I just learned about this.

From reading in Gordon Strong's -Brewing better beer- A high ph in sparge water will pull out tannins. The gypsum will only lower the ph in the mash reacting with the phosphates in the grain so use it there. Gypsum in sparge water doesn't do much in the way of dropping the ph. Adding 1/4 tsp of phosphoric acid to 5 gallons of water will lower a 6.7 ph to 5.7 ph. Sparge water is best at 5.8 or lower (a good aim is 5.5)

If you have a way to measure ph great, then adjust as needed. If not, no worries you will be fine. so to answer you question, distilled or tap water... measure ph of both and go with whichever is closer to 5.5 or I would use the distilled if you already have it one hand...

Again, have fun with it either way and good luck on your first all grain!
Thanks. I understand that I'm probably over thinking this but I figure try to do it right the first time and you can only improve from there.
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Old 04-20-2013, 05:34 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harvestsmiles View Post
First off, as your first all grain, don't get too overwhelmed with water chemistry. You will still make an awesome beer if you pay no mind to the water. But as you are interested I will pass on what I just learned about this.

From reading in Gordon Strong's -Brewing better beer- A high ph in sparge water will pull out tannins. The gypsum will only lower the ph in the mash reacting with the phosphates in the grain so use it there. Gypsum in sparge water doesn't do much in the way of dropping the ph. Adding 1/4 tsp of phosphoric acid to 5 gallons of water will lower a 6.7 ph to 5.7 ph. Sparge water is best at 5.8 or lower (a good aim is 5.5)

If you have a way to measure ph great, then adjust as needed. If not, no worries you will be fine. so to answer you question, distilled or tap water... measure ph of both and go with whichever is closer to 5.5 or I would use the distilled if you already have it one hand...

Again, have fun with it either way and good luck on your first all grain!
quick question, does anyone know the percentage of phosphoric acid gordon was referring to? I'm assuming 10% solution but am not sure. Thanks!
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