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Old 06-07-2013, 01:21 PM   #1
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Default Transferring from brew pot to bucket

Prepare yourself for a very basic question, please. I'm getting ready to make batch #4. I aerate my chilled wort by whisking it (and the water addition), pouring it back and forth between brew pot and primary bucket, and swinging and shaking the primary bucket. My question is about a sanitizing step I take in the midst of this.

For the past 3 batches, when I have poured the cooled wort into the primary bucket, I've washed out the brewpot, and then also sanitized it. Then I start the process of pouring some wort back and forth between the bucket and the pot to aerate.

Am I taking an unnecessary step by sanitizing the pot? Thanks!

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Old 06-07-2013, 01:34 PM   #2
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Yes. The brew pot is already sanitized from having boiled the wort in it.

It sounds like you could save yourself a lot of time and energy by just getting a Fizz-X stir rod. Transfer the cooled wort into your fermenter, then work up a good froth with the Fizz-X on a drill.

Also keep in mind that if you're using rehydrated dry yeast, you don't need to go through all that aeration exercise. Aeration is really only important for liquid yeasts.

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Old 06-07-2013, 02:25 PM   #3
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It doesn't matter if dry or liquid. Yeast need o2 for the reproductive phase before visible fermentation begins. The fact that dry yeast has a nutrient in it isn't reason to deny them oxygen.

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Old 06-07-2013, 02:34 PM   #4
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Popcorn, check!

Homebrew, check!

Let the fights begin...

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Old 06-07-2013, 02:41 PM   #5
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I've had great success just by dumping from my pot 1 time and having at it with a whisk, as well. There is plenty of air mixing in with the wort as you're dumping it from the pot to the bucket. You don't have to go crazy, but remembering to whisk for 30 seconds can really help. Whether you use liquid or dry yeast should not make a difference. Keep the process the same for both just so you don't accidentally forget to aerate.

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Old 06-07-2013, 02:55 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by unionrdr View Post
It doesn't matter if dry or liquid. Yeast need o2 for the reproductive phase before visible fermentation begins. The fact that dry yeast has a nutrient in it isn't reason to deny them oxygen.
Yeast need oxygen to synthesize the sterols needed during the reproductive phase.

Dry yeast already has all the sterols they'll need "frozen" into them at storage time.

From the experts:

Quote:
I always aerate my wort when using liquid yeast. Do I need to aerate the wort before pitching dry yeast?

No, there is no need to aerate the wort but it does not harm the yeast either. During its aerobic production, dry yeast accumulates sufficient amounts of unsaturated fatty acids and sterols to produce enough biomass in the first stage of fermentation. The only reason to aerate the wort when using wet yeast is to provide the yeast with oxygen so that it can produce sterols and unsaturated fatty acids which are important parts of the cell membrane and therefore essential for biomass production.

If the slurry from dry yeast fermentation is re-pitched from one batch of beer to another, the wort has to be aerated as with any liquid yeast.
- Danstar Yeast FAQ
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Old 06-07-2013, 03:19 PM   #7
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Revvy posted on this same topic before... I usually take his advice whenever it is applicable to my situation. If it can't hurt and it doesn't really take much time/effort, what's the problem?

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Evidently there is some info on Danstar's website that indicates you don't need to aerate dry yeast...there's supposedly sufficient stuff in the yeast cells already. But honestly you have to consider the source. We're talking about Danstar here, the makers of Nottingham with it's notorious tendency to suffer the 1.020 curse.

So honestly, I'm going to take that info with a grain of salt....I will aerate and not stop doing so....I feel that it can't hurt if you do it, it could only help....

Plus, I have never been happy with the results Notty or Windsor, and use Fermentis dry yeast for the majority of my beers...I'd say I use US-05 for about 90% of my beers.

And this is what it says on their website;



BTW, this PDF. from them is great info for people. http://www.fermentis.com/FO/pdf/Tips-Tricks.pdf
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Old 06-07-2013, 03:23 PM   #8
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Idk...not aerating with dry yeast seems to take a bit longer for it to visibly start fermenting with the same vigor as when I do. While there may be some truth to those statements,My own observations say there's more to it.

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Old 06-07-2013, 03:37 PM   #9
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Nottingham is known for stalling at 1.020? Since when? I thought that was an extract issue, not a yeast issue.

I thought the thing Notty was known for (if anything) was ferocious fermentations requiring a blowoff tube. Doesn't sound like a yeast particularly starved for oxygen to me.

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Old 06-07-2013, 03:38 PM   #10
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Out of curiosity, I looked over the info from Fermentis myself (http://www.fermentis.com/wp-content/...oklet_En.pdf):

Quote:
Oxygen is required to assure a healthy cell multiplication. Oxygenation is
either made by top filling and splashing wort against the wall of the
fermenter, aeration or direct oxygen injection. It is usually recommended
to make the oxygenation on cooled wort. At this stage hygiene is essential
since bacteria may develop during the aeration. Oxygen should only be
added in the first twelve hours of fermentation (9 ppm). Adding oxygen
during late fermentation will increase aldehyde levels and amplify diacetyl
formation. High levels of oxygen will suppress ester production. It has been
noticed that oxygen can increase SO² concentrations in some worts.
I use S-05 a lot, and I like the beer it makes. I'll probably continue to aerate. Maybe Danstar's process is different in making their product and doesn't need aeration, that I don't know, but since I use Fermentis' yeast when using dry yeast, I will follow their best practices.
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