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Old 01-12-2013, 07:48 PM   #21
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It is you beer and I know how hard it is to wait and be patient when you're on your second batch ever. I suggest the 3 weeks primary then transfer to the bottling bucket and bottling. It has worked for many of us. Patience pays, trust us. You will probably try it eventually anyways and wish you had sooner.

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Old 01-12-2013, 08:06 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystikty

I don't know about the three weeks in primary. I just took another reading, and it was still 1.011. Today marks day 7 of my fermentation and it seems that it is time to bottle. The recipe says that the typical fermentation time is 7-10 days. I'll give it another day or two before taking another reading.
Although fermentation may be complete, you will want to give it a couple of weeks to condition. This will let the yeast "clean up" and produce a better tasting beer.
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Old 01-12-2013, 09:01 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystikty View Post
I don't know about the three weeks in primary. I just took another reading, and it was still 1.011. Today marks day 7 of my fermentation and it seems that it is time to bottle. The recipe says that the typical fermentation time is 7-10 days. I'll give it another day or two before taking another reading.
Wait at least two weaks no matter what the gravity says. The extra time will help clear your beer and let the yeast clean up and leave any biproducts in the bucket and not the bottle. My first two I left in the bucket 3 weeks and 2.5 weeks and my third will be in there between 2.5 and 3 weeks.

To your original question it may be more bitter than style but it should taste fine. I LOVE Chinook though so if you don't like it mail me a couple and I will help you get rid of them.
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Old 01-12-2013, 11:26 PM   #24
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Thank you for your replies. I do trust you and will do what you suggest. I have heard of the term "conditioning" but I never knew what it meant. I do have a question though. Will my yeast stay alive for three weeks or will I need to re-pitch at the time I add the priming sugar?

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Old 01-12-2013, 11:38 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystikty View Post
Thank you for your replies. I do trust you and will do what you suggest. I have heard of the term "conditioning" but I never knew what it meant. I do have a question though. Will my yeast stay alive for three weeks or will I need to re-pitch at the time I add the priming sugar?
No need to repitch, there will be plenty of yeast for priming. Make sure that after you add the priming sugar and bottle, that you give the bottles about 3 weeks at 70 degrees to properly carbonate.
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Old 01-26-2013, 02:03 AM   #26
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Well, I just bottled my brew last night. Before I did that I checked the FG and it stayed at 1.011. The broth was a beautiful amber

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Old 01-26-2013, 04:30 AM   #27
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Chinook is a great hop IMO, one of my favorite IPAs is an all Chinook, in fact, I'm drinking it as I type. It might be bitter for an amber, but if you like Hops, imo, you'll love it.

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Old 01-26-2013, 04:44 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mystikty
Well, I just bottled my brew last night. Before I did that I checked the FG and it stayed at 1.011. The broth was a beautiful amber
I accidently sent out a post before finishing what I had to say. Sorry about that. Anyway, the broth came out to be a beautiful clear amber color and the smell was amazing. My husband and I took a swig and the bitterness wasn't so bad. Actually, the beer tasted pretty good. I look forward to tasting the final product in about three weeks. Next, I am working on a recipe for a Belgium Witbier. I haven't decided if I would go AG or PM. Either way, I don't have the pot to do a full-boil so I would either need to cut the recipe in half or do a split pot where I would boil the spices and hops in one pot and the extracts and grains in the other. I'm still researching my options.
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Old 02-15-2013, 06:37 AM   #29
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Well, I have tried my amber ale. It is a bit hoppy for what I like but the flavor is nice. The problem is that it is a little flat. I kept the brew in primary for three weeks and then bottled it with 3/4 cup of corn syrup. I Iet the brew sit for three weeks before tasting it. I have 52 bottles of this. My concern was that my viable yeast count after three weeks would be too low to sufficiently carbonate the beer without re pitching. Now, I'm worried that my beer is ruined. Is there anyway to salvage this?

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Old 02-15-2013, 09:47 AM   #30
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How long has it been since packaging? There's no way that 3 weeks would change the viability of the yeast. If you have already bottled it, there's not a helluva lot you can do to carb it up more. Give it three weeks and if it aint carbed up properly by then, call it an English bitter and pretend it was on purpose.

Either way the beer isn't ruined, its just different to what you expected it to be. Still beer. Still drinkable.

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