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Old 12-25-2012, 10:43 PM   #1
ml_lm
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Default Too much foam

I am new to the site, only brewed a half a dozen batches. A couple have turned out pretty good, while the rest come out with a giant head on the beer and way too much foam. Almost seems overcarbonated, but I don't think there is an issue of too much sugar. The beer eventually tastes just fine once the head goes down and it sits for a few min. Any idea what the problem is???? TIA.

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Old 12-25-2012, 10:53 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ml_lm View Post
I am new to the site, only brewed a half a dozen batches. A couple have turned out pretty good, while the rest come out with a giant head on the beer and way too much foam. Almost seems overcarbonated, but I don't think there is an issue of too much sugar. The beer eventually tastes just fine once the head goes down and it sits for a few min. Any idea what the problem is???? TIA.
That's a new one.

As far as head retention goes, I'm not sure if there is really too much of a good thing, but things like using wheat or crystal malts would contribute.

As far as it actually being overcarbonated for the particular style, it could be one of three things that I can think of. Firstly, adding too much priming sugar, but I assume you're using a calculator, e.g. this. Secondly, if your beer isn't completely attenuated prior to bottling, fermentation could continue and overcarbonate; the hydrometer is your friend here, of course, since the reading needs to be stable prior to bottling. Thirdly, it could be an infection/sanitation issue, since infections can lead to "gushers"/excess carbonation.
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Old 12-26-2012, 04:04 PM   #3
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I'm a newb too, but I have heard that if it is not gushing when opening the bottle, another reason you may be getting too much head is your glassware. If there is any dust, dishwasher detergent, etc. in the glass, then it provides nucleation points and releases the CO2. Try rinsing your glass with cold water first, and pour the beer in with the glass still wet and see if it makes a difference. Some bars have sprayers they touch the glasses to before filling them for this reason.

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