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Old 07-23-2013, 08:36 PM   #1
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Default Think its infected? looks pretty grose

Hi all,

I am a 'newb' still messing around with kits and adding different stuff to secondary to improve my brews.
This is a stout I’ve been racking for 3 weeks now, I tried to infuse it with coffee via 'cold extraction' and added home made vanilla essence in brandy.
I just checked it because I was thinking about bottling as you can see there is a gross layer on top with bubbles in it.

I have been transferring to different bins through the fermentation processes because I ruined one of my first beers when I left it on top of the yeast too long. But I do my best to thoroughly sanitise everything.

Very worried about this infection, is it ruined? Can it be saved? if so how?

Once I have stopped uncontrollably sobbing of course...

20130723_195556.jpg  
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Old 07-23-2013, 08:39 PM   #2
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That looks like the ocean floor, infected for sure.
Why transfer at all? Just leave in primary for 3 week.

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Old 07-23-2013, 08:49 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuiceyJay View Post
That looks like the ocean floor, infected for sure.
Why transfer at all? Just leave in primary for 3 week.
Or 4 weeks or 5, even 6. I only secondary if I am adding something besides hops to my beer or if I am lagering. Unnecessarily transferring beer only opens you up to a higher chance of infection.

That beer is infected, but I know a lot of guys just rack under it and give it more time in the bottle/keg to mature or clean itself up. You will know if you get infected beer into the bottle anyway, KABOOM! You can always bottle them, put them in Rubbermaid tubs with tops, and hope for the best. If you keg, then you are golden. It isn't going to kill you.
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Old 07-23-2013, 08:52 PM   #4
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That's definitely an infection, I'm just not sure what. It might be a wild yeast pellicle, or it could be pediococcus, or something else entirely.
This may or may not ruin it, though it will very likely produce some flavors you weren't expecting. When it's done fermenting, take a small sample and see how it tastes. If it doesn't taste good, you could try leaving it for a month or two and see what happens. If it is extremely foul, probably just toss it.

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Old 07-23-2013, 08:53 PM   #5
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it has quite the pellicle there, could be brett, but it also could be lots of things, may try saving it for a bit and see what it tastes like


I am a proponent of trying to keep things as simple as possible till you get to know the process and can make it repeatable. so I will second the suggestion to not do a secondary for your next few brews at least.

-chickens

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Old 07-23-2013, 09:03 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JuiceyJay View Post
That looks like the ocean floor, infected for sure.
Why transfer at all? Just leave in primary for 3 week.
Yeah it looks like there should be the hull of the Titanic somewhere. IMO this could be a good thing. Wont hurt letting it hang out for awhile. It would be a good idea mark any plastics that you used during fermentation/post fermentation as "brett" so you know not to use them with your other beers. This is paranoid but I don't like all my beers sour.

You aren't alone. Check out all the photos on this thread
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Old 07-23-2013, 09:35 PM   #7
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You cold extracted coffee and dumped it in your beer? So no heat involved to sanitize the coffee? I would expect that even though coffee is roasted, it's probably not real sanitary.

How did you ruin your first batch letting it sit on the yeast? How long was it on there? You probably didn't ruin it from being on the yeast cake unless it was on there for months and months and months. I would suggest you set the racking cane down and forget where you put it.

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Old 07-23-2013, 09:41 PM   #8
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[QUOTE=BlindFaith;5369529]Or 4 weeks or 5, even 6. I only secondary if I am adding something besides hops to my beer or if I am lagering. Unnecessarily transferring beer only opens you up to a higher chance of infection.

ohh right i read on a 'brew tips' site somewhere (i cant find it now, countless hours of staring at brewing tips) that after primary (7 to 10 day) you want to get the young beer off of the waste on the bottom asap to avoid autolysis and rack it to improve it. One of my early brews tasted like arse, it was a bit of a cheap kit but was really yeasty and my girlfriend who works in a real ale pub described it as 'off' and unservable. i thought it was standard practice to do this. so i can just leave a beer for ages in primary and it works the same as racking?

I added espresso that i cold extracted from a pack of sealed grounds, vanilla extract in brandy and 125 grams of DME.

So do i will just leave the scuzz on top for a few more weeks and hope for the best a bottle then?

cheers for the fast wisdom guys!

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Old 07-23-2013, 09:48 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dgr View Post
You cold extracted coffee and dumped it in your beer? So no heat involved to sanitize the coffee? I would expect that even though coffee is roasted, it's probably not real sanitary.

How did you ruin your first batch letting it sit on the yeast? How long was it on there? You probably didn't ruin it from being on the yeast cake unless it was on there for months and months and months. I would suggest you set the racking cane down and forget where you put it.
yeah i read that hot brewing the coffee gave it a really harsh acrid taste. used boilded filterd water and sanitised the bowl, could think of a way to clean the coffee though except cold extracting it in vodka?

looks like i may have got this whole racking deal a bit wrong!
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Old 07-23-2013, 10:57 PM   #10
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[quote=flash-shabby;5369649]

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlindFaith View Post
Or 4 weeks or 5, even 6. I only secondary if I am adding something besides hops to my beer or if I am lagering. Unnecessarily transferring beer only opens you up to a higher chance of infection.

ohh right i read on a 'brew tips' site somewhere (i cant find it now, countless hours of staring at brewing tips) that after primary (7 to 10 day) you want to get the young beer off of the waste on the bottom asap to avoid autolysis and rack it to improve it. One of my early brews tasted like arse, it was a bit of a cheap kit but was really yeasty and my girlfriend who works in a real ale pub described it as 'off' and unservable. i thought it was standard practice to do this. so i can just leave a beer for ages in primary and it works the same as racking?

I added espresso that i cold extracted from a pack of sealed grounds, vanilla extract in brandy and 125 grams of DME.

So do i will just leave the scuzz on top for a few more weeks and hope for the best a bottle then?

cheers for the fast wisdom guys!
You added more DME to the secondary? For why?
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