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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Temp question and IIPA question
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Old 07-26-2008, 09:07 AM   #1
becksbolero2
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Default Temp question and IIPA question

So a couple weeks ago I started my first batch of beer I used an ipa recipe from my local shop. I followed the instructions the only problem I had was getting the wort cooled down fast enough. it took me about 40 minutes to get it down to the correct temp. I know I could buy a chiller to expedite the process, but I don't think that I am at that stage yet. My question is...what is the reason for getting the wort cooled so fast ?

other minor questions

if my holding temps for the primary and secondary are between 75-77 is that ok or am I pushing it?

when bottling is it ok if I use random sized bottles or is it better if they are all the same size. I was thinking it may have some effect when it comes to the carbonation.

I love Ipa's , the ones where you can smell the hops from a mile away. (broken halo is one of my favorites) Can someone tell me more about dry hopping like when to do it (primary or secondary) and what kind of hops are best to use in dry hopping.

also....can someone tell me about IIPA or DIPA are these just made like a regular ipa but with extra hops ??


thanks for the help

~the lazy brewer

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Old 07-26-2008, 09:57 AM   #2
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HEllo from a fellow new brewer>

I can tell you what I have learned, read, or been told by others on HBT about a few of your questions.

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what is the reason for getting the wort cooled so fast ?
Cold Break -It is essential that the cold break be precipitated as much as possible, which is done by a very rapid cooling. The wort must be force-cooled to below 10ºC to secure a satisfactory break, and it precipitates best at 0 to 5ºC. Complete precipitation of polyphenol/proteins to achieve a brilliantly clear beer is achieved by cooling the wort until it becomes slushy. Many brewers have found that following this procedure greatly reduces the need for clarification. A long, slow cooling does not give a good cold break because more protein is trapped in suspension; this gives rise to a finer trub, chill haze, and harsh, sulfur-like aftertastes in the beer. Coarse trub is essential for good separation and good beer stability. In addition, a rapid cooling will minimize the development of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), which is more likely, to form when using lager malt. If the wort is reheated, cold trub will go back into solution, forming a chill haze.

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if my holding temps for the primary and secondary are between 75-77 is that ok or am I pushing it?
IMHO you are pushing it. I have the same problem, I use the water/ice bath but am away work so much that I can not keep the ice changed out as I would like.

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when bottling is it ok if I use random sized bottles or is it better if they are all the same size. I was thinking it may have some effect when it comes to the carbonation.
I use 2 differnet size bottles, 33cl and 50cl I hope that it does not matter, but I really do not think it does. The priming solution should be distributed evenly in the beer so it it should all be the same.

As for IPA's I know nothing about them, sorry.

Hope this helped.

Tim
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Old 07-26-2008, 10:56 AM   #3
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becksbolero2;772682]My question is...what is the reason for getting the wort cooled so fast ?

Cold break stops the chemical processes that effect the hop flavours, helps to break out some of the sediments from the wort, and a host of other things.
Simple answer, cool it as fast as you can, but don't worry - have a "home" brew and relax. Since its your first brew drink a commercial but don't tell anyone.

"Between 75-77 is that ok or am I pushing it?"

Depending on your yeast, but yes. At higher temps some/most yeast will produce esters and other flavours that you may not like. Use a Tee shirt or towel, wet it down and the evaporation will lower it a couple of degrees into the sweet spot for most yeast.

"Is it ok if I use random sized bottles".

Use a bottling bucket, boil water and add the sugar to that, then pour it into the bucket. Then rack (siphon) the beer into the bucket to mix it well. From there any size bottle will get the right amount of carbonation sugars in it.
On a side note - bottling is hell, if you like homebrewing IMNSHO move to kegging as soon as you can.


Can someone tell me more about dry hopping like when to do it (primary or secondary) and what kind of hops are best to use in dry hopping.

Depends on your taste and ability to get hit in the mouth with a double wammie. Most people dry hop in the secondary, some in the keg, some in the late days of the primary, or if you really love your hops you do it in all. More is better right?

IIPA or DIPS??

Higher OG - Higher FG - Higher IBU's, Bigger bitter beers faces on the clueless.
What's not to love about it. There are tons of recipes out on different ones. Just realize they take more time to ferment and condition, then even longer in bottles.
Welcome to brewing, hope this helps.

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Old 07-27-2008, 04:21 PM   #4
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Check out the Jamil Show on Double IPAS. Also there's the Sunday Session about brewing a DIPA.

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