The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Swap out buckets for a carboy?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-07-2012, 08:05 PM   #11
ludomonster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: berlin, nj
Posts: 507
Liked 33 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 33

Default

The shape of your fermenting vessel has an effect on your beer. It's not a slight against one vessel or another, but all other things the same, a beer fermented in a bucket will be slightly different from a beer fermented in a carboy.

__________________
ludomonster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-07-2012, 08:50 PM   #12
iambeer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Wash, DC
Posts: 1,236
Liked 157 Times on 121 Posts
Likes Given: 128

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brewit2it View Post
Like I said, it is probably only potentially an issue if you are using old or antique glassware.

Anyway, I think I'll RDWHA lunch break LOL.
That history is actually interesting to know, thank you for sharing it. But young children (aged 6-84 months) are usually the sub-population of chief concern for lead exposure. The chance that children will be drinking beer from your antique carboy is negligible. Plastics have a similar problem with BPA, which affects most of all babies, kids and nursing mothers. BPA has only been removed from plastics since 2008 in the US. That's because evidently we are still discovering harmful chemicals that are leeching out of plastics. Plastic from China, from Mexico, and from Detroit, Michigan.

There's a strong case for using glass and stainless steel against plastics. But I think the strongest argument for me is that I will never have to worry about in which order oxy-clean + bleach + star-san needs to be used to clean my new food grade BPA-free bucket after a bacterial growth without leaving an awful smell or alas have to replace it.

The only case against glass for me is the cost, but it evens out in the long term.

::reaches for beer::.... damn I'm still at work.
__________________
iambeer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-07-2012, 09:31 PM   #13
brewit2it
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Glendora, CA
Posts: 845
Liked 15 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by iambeer View Post
That history is actually interesting to know, thank you for sharing it. But young children (aged 6-84 months) are usually the sub-population of chief concern for lead exposure. The chance that children will be drinking beer from your antique carboy is negligible. Plastics have a similar problem with BPA, which affects most of all babies, kids and nursing mothers. BPA has only been removed from plastics since 2008 in the US. That's because evidently we are still discovering harmful chemicals that are leeching out of plastics. Plastic from China, from Mexico, and from Detroit, Michigan.

There's a strong case for using glass and stainless steel against plastics. But I think the strongest argument for me is that I will never have to worry about in which order oxy-clean + bleach + star-san needs to be used to clean my new food grade BPA-free bucket after a bacterial growth without leaving an awful smell or alas have to replace it.

The only case against glass for me is the cost, but it evens out in the long term.

::reaches for beer::.... damn I'm still at work.
Yeah, kind of like choose your poison. In fact the most neuro-toxic thing in your beer is the exact thing we are after so I don't get too worked up about any of it

That being said, I hate to burst another bubble but lead is damn toxic and not just to children. From wikipedia:

Lead is highly poisonous metal (regardless if inhaled or swallowed), affecting almost every organ and system in the body. The main target for lead toxicity is the nervous system, both in adults and children. Long-term exposure of adults can result in decreased performance in some tests that measure functions of the nervous system. Long-term exposure to lead or its salts (especially soluble salts or the strong oxidant PbO2) can cause nephropathy, and colic-like abdominal pains. It may also cause weakness in fingers, wrists, or ankles. Lead exposure also causes small increases in blood pressure, particularly in middle-aged and older people and can cause anemia. Exposure to high lead levels can severely damage the brain and kidneys in adults or children and ultimately cause death. In pregnant women, high levels of exposure to lead may cause miscarriage. Chronic, high-level exposure have shown to reduce fertility in males.[70] Lead also damages nervous connections (especially in young children) and cause blood and brain disorders. Lead poisoning typically results from ingestion of food or water contaminated with lead; but may also occur after accidental ingestion of contaminated soil, dust, or lead-based paint.[71] It is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and is believed to have adverse effects on the central nervous system, the cardiovascular system, kidneys, and the immune system.[72] The component limit of lead (1.0 μg/g) is a test benchmark for pharmaceuticals, representing the maximum daily intake an individual should have. However, even at this low level, a prolonged intake can be hazardous to human beings.[73][74] The treatment for lead poisoning consists of dimercaprol and succimer.[75]
__________________

See my cheap new Keezer Build Here:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/chea...keezer-224848/

Primary: 2 Row IPA
Second Primary: Kolsch-like ale

Keg 1: Blur Moon
Keg 2: Empty
Keg 3: Empty

Bottled: None

brewit2it is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-07-2012, 09:41 PM   #14
kh54s10
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Tiverton, Rhode Island
Posts: 6,418
Liked 554 Times on 470 Posts
Likes Given: 150

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ludomonster View Post
The shape of your fermenting vessel has an effect on your beer. It's not a slight against one vessel or another, but all other things the same, a beer fermented in a bucket will be slightly different from a beer fermented in a carboy.

Really?? Conical maybe, but the difference in shape of a carboy as opposed to a bucket?? They are both cylinders of approximately the same proportions.
As for the headspace shape that would only come into play with a large krausen.

IMO you would be very hard pressed to tell any difference, if there would be any in the first place.
__________________
kh54s10 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-07-2012, 09:43 PM   #15
rappyfreak
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Guatemala, Guatemala
Posts: 125
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I use the new Cooper's fermenter (great fermenter, bottles, bottling wand and hydrometer, the cooper lager kit sucked arse). I love that it is transparent, plastic, has a krausen collar and uses no airlock, have brewed 6 batches in it and I love it! Best of both worlds, plastic and transparent and is like for 8 gallons.

__________________
rappyfreak is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-07-2012, 10:15 PM   #16
duboman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Glenview, IL
Posts: 5,956
Liked 450 Times on 419 Posts
Likes Given: 200

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kh54s10

Really?? Conical maybe, but the difference in shape of a carboy as opposed to a bucket?? They are both cylinders of approximately the same proportions.
As for the headspace shape that would only come into play with a large krausen.

IMO you would be very hard pressed to tell any difference, if there would be any in the first place.
I've brewed the same recipe over and over again in both and have never been able to tell the difference in the final product as to which vessel it was brewed in
__________________
Nothing Left to do but smile and drink beer.....

The Commune Brewing Company-Perfecting the "art" of beer since 2010
duboman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 09:38 AM   #17
Kyricus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 32
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

The biggest headache to a carboy as others have mentioned is cleaning it. What a PITA.

I've only used my carboy as a secondary because watching the fermentation process is about as exciting to me as watching paint dry. That said, I use it because I can see the "clarity" of my beer before bottling and because I like using secondaries (heretical I know).

But anyway, cleaning it, and moving it about are the most difficult things, a bucket is far easier. I don't think you'll notice any other difference in your beer.

__________________
My Ramblings
Kyricus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 01:00 PM   #18
gsueagle7703
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Dublin, Georgia
Posts: 12
Default

Thanks to all for the rapid responses to my question. Think this site is defiantly a keeper for questions in the future.

__________________
gsueagle7703 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 01:59 PM   #19
Peppers16
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Nottingham, (UK)
Posts: 205
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Some glass advantages:
No oxygen transfer (only worth considering for very long conditioning periods)
No accumulation of bacteria-harboring scratches

So glass is probably the way to got for wines and ciders that you mature but for beer its not such an issue.

__________________
Peppers16 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-08-2012, 02:37 PM   #20
Kate00
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 275
Liked 9 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

I use 6 gallon Better Bottles. I highly recommend those if you are looking at carboys. Light weight, resistant to cracking/ breaking and the opening at the top is a little bigger. I use these over buckets just because i like being able to watch the yeast churn, and see how the beer is clearing up. I've thought of switching to buckets because of easier cleaning, but stay with these cuz its fun to watch. Its kinda like looking at a lava lamp when fermentation starts.

The only thing I would suggest doing if you switch is wrapping your carboy in a towel or a tshirt to keep light from getting in. Buckets stop light without a towel.

__________________
Kate00 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
More fun with buckets! hnsfeigel Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 02-01-2012 05:32 PM
Carboy swap? OHIOSTEVE Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 2 03-14-2011 05:34 AM
Reusing yeast in primary carboy with hops on walls of carboy? brewinginct Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 09-27-2010 06:39 PM
How many buckets do I need? betterbeer1 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 01-22-2010 08:31 PM
mmmm beer swap! OHIOSTEVE Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 11-30-2009 06:05 PM