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Old 11-22-2005, 06:20 PM   #1
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Default Substitute for Liquid Invert Sugar?

I started a cider kit from Vinoka a few days ago. On the directions it calls for adding Liquid Invert Sugar before carbonating and bottling. It does say you can use store bought sugar or corn sugar but not "Brewers Glucose". Maybe I'm just being critical but I used cane sugar before in a beer since I didn't know any better and it tastes like crap. What the heck is LIS? Is cane sugar really an OK substitute? How about honey, would that work? Honey sounds yummy but would it taste funny?

TIA,
Bryan

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Old 11-22-2005, 06:29 PM   #2
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LIS is "partially inverted refiners syrup". I have no idea what that means, except that it must be unrefined so cane sugar would be out. You might find some more info on the Lyle's web site.

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Old 11-22-2005, 06:46 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zoom233
I started a cider kit from Vinoka a few days ago. On the directions it calls for adding Liquid Invert Sugar before carbonating and bottling. It does say you can use store bought sugar or corn sugar but not "Brewers Glucose".
I didn't realize when I first read this that you were talking about priming...in this case corn sugar should work.

Also just to be safe, I'd post this question down in the Cider Forum so that someone who know's something about cider will see it.
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Old 11-22-2005, 08:07 PM   #4
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I think if I remember correctly then LIS is sugar boiled in acid. It's called inverted because it inverts light passed through it.

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Old 11-22-2005, 08:37 PM   #5
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Found this on a cooking website:

Definition: Invert sugar is created by combining a sugar syrup with a small amount of acid (such as cream of tartar or lemon juice) and heating. This inverts, or breaks down, the sucrose into its two components, glucose and fructose, thereby reducing the size of the sugar crystals. Because of its fine crystal structure, invert sugar produces a smoother product and is used in making candies such as fondant, and some syrups. The process of making jams and jellies automatically produces invert sugar by combining the natural acid in the fruit with granulated sugar and heating the mixture. Invert sugar can usually be found in jars in cake-decorating supply shops.
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Old 11-22-2005, 10:30 PM   #6
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The sugar is added to sweeten up the cider after it has been fermented I think, not for priming. You're supposed to use a carbonating keg to sparkle it. I've got a couple kegs and CO2 so that isn't a problem, I wasn't even going to bottle it I was just going to leave it in the keg.

The reason I ask about the invert sugar is I was wondering if it is some type of sugar that isn't available to the yeast so it stays in the cider and sweetens it up.

If someone has a good answer as to what I can use then post it here by all means but I guess I will post in the cider forum too, I didn't realize there was one.

Thanks for the help,
Bryan

PS. The Vinoka kits were buy one get one free at the local shop so after the cider I have a Cranberry Hard Lemonade but after that I'm sure I'll be back in this forum looking for some suggestions and help. I wan't to brew up a coffee stout next I think, two of my favorite things.

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Old 11-23-2005, 07:44 AM   #7
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You can always use Candi Sugar which is basically invert sugar, or simple table sugar that is hydrolyzed, table sugar transformed into glucose and fructose, which speeds fermentation. I have two recipes for making Belgian Candi Sugar. Let me know if you need them.

Good luck,
Wild

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Old 11-25-2005, 09:52 AM   #8
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Wild - could you post up those recipies for making Belgian Candi Sugar - I'm planning on making a few Belgian style beers over the winter and a lb of Candi Sugar is about $4.50 here in the UK so it may well save me a bit of cash if I can convert cane sugar to candi

cheers !

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Old 11-28-2005, 08:16 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80/-
Wild - could you post up those recipies for making Belgian Candi Sugar
Here you go:

Method #1: From Brewmaxer http://www.brewmaxer.com/tips/invert_sugar.html

Invert sugar is made by mixing two parts sugar to one part water, adding two teaspoons lemon juice per pound of sugar. This is brought almost to a boil and held there for 30 minutes (do NOT allow to boil). This is poured into a sealable jar, sealed and cooled in refrigerator. This process hydrolyzes sucrose into glucose and fructose and speeds fermentation. Invert sugar should NOT be used to sweeten finished wine as it will encourage refermentation.
For 1 pound invert sugar:
• 2 cups finely granulated sugar
• 1 cup water
• 2 tsp lemon juice

Expand the recipe above to make the amount required by a particular recipe. For example, to make 2½ pounds of invert sugar, use 5 cups sugar, 2½ cups water and 5 tsp lemon juice. Make the invert sugar at least 2 hours ahead of time (to give it sufficient time to cool).

Method #2
From Homebrewer's Digest:
http://hbd.org/franklin/public_html/...ndi_sugar.html

Making Belgian Candi Sugar

Belgian brewers often use sugar in beer making to produce high alcohol beers without a thick body. They normally will use what is called Candi Sugar, but this stuff is pretty expensive, costing homebrewers around $4-5 per pound. Basically, candi sugar is ordinary white cane/beet sugar (sucrose) that has been modified by an 'inversion' process, producing 'invert sugar'.

You can make your own 'invert sugar' from ordinary table sugar with just a few simple items. Sucrose is made up of two simpler sugars (glucose and fructose) joined together. Yeast must spend time and effort breaking the joining bonds to allow them to get at the simple sugars they need for metabolism. This can be done chemically in an acid environment with heat. You will need a candy thermometer that goes up to about 350°F and a 2 qt saucepan. The ingredients are sugar, water, and citric acid to provide the acidic environment needed.
There are certain temperatures that relate to the process of candy making as shown in the table below. The terms refer to how the sugar will behave on cooling.

Term Used Temperature
Soft Ball 240°F
Hard Ball 260°F
Soft Crack 275°F
Hard Crack 300°F

To make a pound of Candi Sugar, measure a pound of sugar into the 2 qt saucepan. Add just enough water to make a thick syrup, and mix in a pinch of citric acid. Now bring to a boil and keep the temperature between hard ball and soft crack (260°-275°F). As you boil, evaporation will cause the temperature to begin rising, so have a small amount of water on hand and add a tablespoon whenever the temperature gets above 275°F.

The color will gradually change from clear to light amber to deep red as the boil proceeds. Light candi sugar is a very light amber-yellow. This can take as little as 15 minutes. Dark candi sugar is very deep red. This can take several hours. Once you are at the color you desire, you stop adding water and let the temperature rise to hard crack (300°F). Once it hits hard crack, turn off the heat and pour it into a shallow pan (like a cake pan) lined with a sheet of waxed paper. As it cools it will go rock hard, and you can break it into 'rocks', bag in a Ziplock bag and store in the freezer until you are ready to use it.

Good luck,
Wild
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Old 11-29-2005, 04:04 PM   #10
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I used citric acid and cane sugar, boiled for an hour. Be carful boiling though, the longer you boil it, the darker it can get from carmelizing. This will also affect your desired color outcome and can make it darker.

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