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Old 04-05-2011, 03:23 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by McDingleberry View Post
I see a lot of people talking about using distilled/RO water. I always thought that was a bad idea, because the disolved minerals will affect the taste and mouthfeel of the beer, and RO/DI water has no minerals at all. After a quick look, I found a couple of articles.

http://www.beer-brewing.com/beer-bre...wing_water.htm

http://www.beer-brewing.com/beer-bre...adjustment.htm

http://www.brew-monkey.com/articles/waterarticle.php
Water chemistry is very important in brewing. That's why I recommend using RO/distilled water for extract brewers. The maker of the extract has already determined the proper water profile, and the necessary mineral content is already in the extract. By using your local tap water, you're including minerals and salts that are not intended for the recipe. In some cases this won't be noticeable, but in others it can make a big difference.

I'm an AG brewer and use deionized water and build my water profile from there. My tap water is very hard so I don't even bother with it.
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:28 AM   #62
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I agree. Because of boiloff, etc, you may need to purchase 6 gallons of distilled water. but I think it would be worth it if you can figure out why the bad taste. You're using quality beer kits, you'll be using quality yeast, and the only variable is the water. Bad water= bad beer. Always. Chlorine causes a "plastic" or clove taste, but there are other flavors too from water.
So here is the question. Assuming the RO water is in fact RO and done well and filtered as advertised and all, is OR better / worse or the same as distilled water. Keep in mind the distilled water could be sitting around fro months after spending a few weeks on a boat.
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:30 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by BierHerr View Post
Water chemistry is very important in brewing. That's why I recommend using RO/distilled water for extract brewers. The maker of the extract has already determined the proper water profile, and the necessary mineral content is already in the extract. By using your local tap water, you're including minerals and salts that are not intended for the recipe. In some cases this won't be noticeable, but in others it can make a big difference.

I'm an AG brewer and use deionized water and build my water profile from there. My tap water is very hard so I don't even bother with it.
I didn't realize that about extract. I always figured they used RO/DI water so the minerals wouldn't be concentrated.
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:42 AM   #64
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You should be able to get Star San mailed to you. Get it. It's a great sanitizer and needs no rinsing.

Can you do bigger boils? The closer you can get to a full volume boil, the better. I'm wondering if 2 gallon boils (which are done by many) is too much of a concentration.

What are you using to prime the beer when bottling? And how much of it?

You said all malt. I take that to mean you add no additional sugars of any kind.

Does sunlight hit the beer at any time, either during fermentation or after bottling?

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Old 04-05-2011, 03:55 AM   #65
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So here is the question. Assuming the RO water is in fact RO and done well and filtered as advertised and all, is OR better / worse or the same as distilled water. Keep in mind the distilled water could be sitting around fro months after spending a few weeks on a boat.
RO/Distilled/Deionized are essentially all the same, they just get there by different processes. Any minute difference in mineral removal shouldn't be noticeable in your brew.

If your worried about bacteria in the water because of it's time on the boat, then you might want to boil all of it before using. As long as it's in an airtight container,though, I wouldn't expect any problems.
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:57 AM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BierHerr View Post
Water chemistry is very important in brewing. That's why I recommend using RO/distilled water for extract brewers. The maker of the extract has already determined the proper water profile, and the necessary mineral content is already in the extract. By using your local tap water, you're including minerals and salts that are not intended for the recipe. In some cases this won't be noticeable, but in others it can make a big difference.

I'm an AG brewer and use deionized water and build my water profile from there. My tap water is very hard so I don't even bother with it.
So here is the question. Assuming the RO water I have is in fact RO and done well and filtered as advertised and all, is OR better / worse or the same as distilled water. Keep in mind the distilled water could be sitting around fro months after spending a few weeks on a boat. The more water used in the boil, the less added later the better, rigth?
Just so you know, so far I've used LME, the kind sold in bulk, not with the hops or such added. I'm willing to give the dried a try, just haven't yet, the liquid is cheeper and comes with the kits I've used is all. (I actually hope the issue is yeast.) Thanks.
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Old 04-05-2011, 03:59 AM   #67
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Originally Posted by McDingleberry View Post
I didn't realize that about extract. I always figured they used RO/DI water so the minerals wouldn't be concentrated.
That wouldn't make much sense since they don't know what your water profile is like. In some parts of the country it's very hard and in others its very soft, they could never expect any consistency from their product.
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:03 AM   #68
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Originally Posted by ASantiago View Post
You should be able to get Star San mailed to you. Get it. It's a great sanitizer and needs no rinsing.

Can you do bigger boils? The closer you can get to a full volume boil, the better. I'm wondering if 2 gallon boils (which are done by many) is too much of a concentration.

What are you using to prime the beer when bottling? And how much of it?

You said all malt. I take that to mean you add no additional sugars of any kind.

Does sunlight hit the beer at any time, either during fermentation or after bottling?
I think I can boil up to 3 gallons, I use the electric stove which is about 15 years old. It takes about 40 minutes to get 2 gallons up to boil and I don't do a roaring boil, just a bubbeling kind of boil.
I don't add sugar untill bottling, then 5 oz. corn sugar.
No sun light at all.
I've ordered iodophor to sanitize
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:05 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by BierHerr View Post
That wouldn't make much sense since they don't know what your water profile is like. In some parts of the country it's very hard and in others its very soft, they could never expect any consistency from their product.
Yeah, that makes sense. I actually have a RO/DI filter setup that I used for a saltwater fish tank. Looks like I might get some new filter media for it and hook it back up.
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Old 04-05-2011, 04:08 AM   #70
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Originally Posted by togodoug View Post
The more water used in the boil, the less added later the better, rigth?
Just so you know, so far I've used LME, the kind sold in bulk, not with the hops or such added. I'm willing to give the dried a try, just haven't yet, the liquid is cheeper and comes with the kits I've used is all. (I actually hope the issue is yeast.) Thanks.
I think we may be confusing you. When I said "If your worried about bacteria in the water because of it's time on the boat, then you might want to boil all of it before using." I simply meant boil just the water to kill any bacteria. You could also boil all of it with your extract, but then you'd probably want to have a chiller.

Don't worry about the LME vs DME thing. That's not the problem.
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