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Old 01-09-2013, 09:57 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by NewJersey View Post
start with batch sparging instead of flying sparge- many headaches eliminated. scarifice being efficiency. no biggy to me personally
the biab thing seems kinda cool, but not what the original poster is after
Oh, really? Can you elaborate? Most everyone is saying BIAB is what I should do.

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what exactly do you want to "control?"

The only thing not controllable with extract is "exactly" how fermentable it is, but I bet it is normally pretty good for the majority of recipes.
Yeah, thats why I was trying to do all grain. I can start with extract, but ultimately I want to be able to really customize my beers and experiment once I get comfortable with the process. So equipment that I could do both with would be optimal.

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Also, don't get hung up on the extract thing. A good beer made with extracts is still good beer. Mashing all-grain is just making sugar water which is essentially super diluted extract. I enjoy mashing, but it's a huge pain in the ass and adds tons of time for absolutely minimal returns. All it really does is save a few bucks and it will take me years to recoup enough to cover the difference in equipment costs.

Remember that your job is just to make flavorful wort - the yeast makes the beer. If you make an extract beer, pitch a healthy amount of good yeast and control your fermentation temperature well, your beer will be better then any All-Grain brew shoved into a hot closet.
I gotchya... I will prob start with extract, but I just want to be sure I have a system that can easily be ready for all grain so I can fully customize my beer.

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Originally Posted by The_Cleveland_Brew_Shop View Post
Have you considered induction burners? They are about 300/each and use electricity rather than gas to boil, strike.
Are there big benefits to using induction long term? I thought I read that they take quite a bit longer to get hot, which is ok as long as theres some bigger benefit to using them.

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I hope you enjoy homebrewing and I hope you become "obsessed" with it like so many of us already are.
Thanks man! I'm already addicted and I haven't even started
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Old 01-09-2013, 10:22 PM   #52
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So to summarize, I should get:

Starter Kit
9 or 10 gal boil kettle with valve
wort chiller
burner (induction or gas)

Kegerator
keg
c02

possible future upgrade:
cooler mash tun

This setup allows me to brew from extract and all grain BIAB. Also, lets me start small, and get as complex as I want down the road, right?

Any corrections to my list? If not, please recommend places to buy each item. Thx! Getting pumped!
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Old 01-09-2013, 10:59 PM   #53
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wow! great video on BIAB...


Really convinced me to ultimately do BIAB, no sparging, with 3 gal kegs. Looks super quick and convenient, yet still fully customizable.
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Old 01-09-2013, 11:20 PM   #54
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If you want something to grow into I'd recommend a 15 gallon kettle. Less boil over worry and can do 10 gallon batches when the time comes

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Old 01-09-2013, 11:46 PM   #55
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If you want something to grow into I'd recommend a 15 gallon kettle. Less boil over worry and can do 10 gallon batches when the time comes
So way down the road I could add the kettle to 3 keg gravity system? Would there be any issues with that?
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Old 01-10-2013, 12:12 AM   #56
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Not really. Just would have to make sure what you get/make would fit it.

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Old 01-10-2013, 01:08 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robbdmc View Post
wow! great video on BIAB... Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6WVul6IEKk

Really convinced me to ultimately do BIAB, no sparging, with 3 gal kegs. Looks super quick and convenient, yet still fully customizable.
Thanks for sharing this video. Very informative. I didn't realize you could brew all grain using all the same equipment as with extract.

I also like the idea of three gallon batches because I can practice more...

Good luck getting started in your new hobby... My first batch was a extract brew with specialty grains... It's seven days old. Welcome to the club.
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Old 01-10-2013, 01:29 AM   #58
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Any corrections to my list? If not, please recommend places to buy each item. Thx! Getting pumped!
List looks good, but I agree with the above suggestion to consider 15 gal.

If your starter kit doesn't include an autosiphon, I'd add one of those to the list. Also make sure you have a decent thermometer with a long stem (doesn't have to be fancy, but be sure to check the calibration), a big spoon and/or mash paddle, and some big strong mesh bags suitable for holding 10-15 pounds of grain. There are various other sundries and measuring devices that are useful, too. I've found a small digital scale (0.1g increments up to 500g or so) is indispensible for measuring hops and nutrients, and I like to use a Pyrex measuring cup for rehydrating yeast. A bigger scale is also good for weighing grains and is often more convenient for measuring water quantities than a volume measure.
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Old 01-10-2013, 01:32 AM   #59
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It sounds like you're on the right track. I second (or third or fourth) the comment that one's brewing setup is personal and addresses each of our unique values. I'm personally all about simple and do all manual lifting and pouring. The BIAB setup you're zeroing in on will not be wasted because you may always want to make smaller test batches.

Somebody also mentioned the importance of yeast and fermentation control. This is another area you could invest in earlier on. Things like starter flasks, stir plates, and fermentation chambers would all be useful.

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Old 01-10-2013, 01:36 AM   #60
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Don't get an induction unit. Go propane or natural gas. If you want electric see the electric brewing section on how to use a heating element in the kettle. You want some BTU power trust me. If you want to start advanced and ahead of the game, get a bigger burner than you need. I started out with 32 tip natural gas burners when I was brewing 5 gallons and now I use the same burners to brew 30.

Edit

Also, if your budget allows, starting with a 15 gal kettle would be nice. The only thing I would worry about is making sure whatever wort chiller you get is put to good use. For instance, if you get an immersion chiller, some of the coils may not get submerged with a 5 gallon batch in a 15 gallon kettle taking it longer to cool the wort.

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