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Old 07-20-2011, 02:44 PM   #1
Brak23
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Default Should I pitch more yeast?

I have a sweet stout that is heavy on the ingredients. I used about 5 oz of course ground coffee in the boil as well. Its been a bit warmer this summer, and this is the first summer ive brewed. So I put it into a water bath and kept the water around 70-75 degrees. The fermentation was slow to start, usually my beers really take off in 12 hours, but this took close to 24 hours to start the major fermentation portion, but it didn't last as long as the others have. Of course, it bubbled strongly through the airlock for the next week.

My original gravity was 1.060, which is about on target according to my brew program. Im supposed to be at ~1.023 for my FG. Im at week 2.5 and just at 1.040. Which, seems kinda high. I'd hate to let it sit and do nothing and then ruin my beer. So im here to ask.

Also, a "mistake" I had made (which im not sure if it matters). I had the White Labs Yeast. And I left it on the counter for about 7-8 hours on accident before pitching.

My ingredients are:


1) 7 lbs. Dark Malt Extract
2) 1 lb. Black Malt
3) 1 lb. Chocolate Malt
4) 1 lb. Roasted Barley
5) ¾ lb. Crystal Malt (40L)
6) 1 oz Eroica (60 minute boil)


What do the beer gods recommend? Should I ride this one out? Or do I need take some action to get things moving?



UPDATE IN POST #11:
"So its stalled. Its been about a full month (less two days) and has been at 1.040 for the last 3 weeks.

I have another thing of yeast and ready to plop it in. My question now is, Do I need to re-Aerate the wort with the new batch of yeast? (transfer to clean carboy, pitch yeast, shake shake). Or can I just dump it in the current carboy with yeast cake and skip the aeration?"



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Old 07-20-2011, 02:55 PM   #2
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The yeast will generally take care of themselves, population-wise. If you want to goose them, perhaps some yeast nutrient will help.



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Old 07-20-2011, 02:58 PM   #3
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That gravity is way high. Has the gravity been sitting there for 3 days?

If so try to rouse some of the yeast back into suspension. Gently sqirl the fermentor, or use a sanatized brew spoon to gently dig up the yeast cake.

The other recommendation would be to raise the temps, but at 75-80 degrees already, I don't see that doing much good!

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Old 07-20-2011, 02:58 PM   #4
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Big beers usually take longer to ferment,so let it ride. I also don't think the yeast came to any harm. They might have even become a bit more active in that time. A small starter would've been a good idea to insure viability of the yeast. Not to mention getting them in a state of reproduction,so they're ready to go to work quickly.
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Old 07-20-2011, 03:04 PM   #5
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Just my $.02, darker extracts tend to not attenuate well. They're not just base malt, they add specialty grains to make it dark. So that combined with the specialty grains you added, which was ALOT, too much IMO, there may be alot of non fermentable sugar in your brew. Even for my darker beers, I use light or extra light dme and get my color and flavor from specialty grains. Darker extracts add too many unknown variables, unless you know EXACTLY what they use to make it.
As for your ?, I'd go with rousing and letting it sit another few weeks and see where you're at.

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Old 07-20-2011, 03:08 PM   #6
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I've found that to be true with amber & dark malts. My Whiskely Ale took about 2 weeks to finally clear in the bottles. They def don't attenuate as quickly. Def need more patience with them.
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Old 07-20-2011, 03:14 PM   #7
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I've found that to be true with amber & dark malts. My Whiskely Ale took about 2 weeks to finally clear in the bottles. They def don't attenuate as quickly. Def need more patience with them.
Or just skip them and use light extract. That way, you control the specialty grains, not the maltster that made the extract.
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Old 07-20-2011, 03:35 PM   #8
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Well,I've found just getting the color with specialty grains isn't enough. The amber & dark malts,for example,have different flavor qualities that I'd have to play around with for a few batches to match what the extract malts already have. I just tailor my process to make them work.
It's kind of an old school thing I have. It don't wanna work,make it work.
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Old 07-20-2011, 05:00 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Germelli1 View Post
That gravity is way high. Has the gravity been sitting there for 3 days?

If so try to rouse some of the yeast back into suspension. Gently sqirl the fermentor, or use a sanatized brew spoon to gently dig up the yeast cake.

The other recommendation would be to raise the temps, but at 75-80 degrees already, I don't see that doing much good!
I checked it two days ago. I'll check it tonight and rouse them if it's the same.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unionrdr View Post
Big beers usually take longer to ferment,so let it ride. I also don't think the yeast came to any harm. They might have even become a bit more active in that time. A small starter would've been a good idea to insure viability of the yeast. Not to mention getting them in a state of reproduction,so they're ready to go to work quickly.
Yeah. I made the mistake of listening to a brew shop guy telling me not to. Because my "edenburg yeast should be enough on it's own". He's really smart, but his methods are a bit outdated.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NordeastBrewer77 View Post
Just my $.02, darker extracts tend to not attenuate well. They're not just base malt, they add specialty grains to make it dark. So that combined with the specialty grains you added, which was ALOT, too much IMO, there may be alot of non fermentable sugar in your brew. Even for my darker beers, I use light or extra light dme and get my color and flavor from specialty grains. Darker extracts add too many unknown variables, unless you know EXACTLY what they use to make it.
As for your ?, I'd go with rousing and letting it sit another few weeks and see where you're at.

I got the recipe from a shop owner who has made it dozens of times. He said it was his favorite. But I'll keep that in mind for next time. Thanks for the advice!
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Old 07-20-2011, 05:51 PM   #10
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1.060 really isn't a big beer. Your problem lies in all your specialty grains on top of dark Malt extract. This will be a super bitter/roasty beer thats going to take a long time to age out. I'd leave it in primary for at least 1.5 months and I'd probably bulk age it in a secondary for another month. I just did a 1.125 Imperial Stout and after 2 weeks its lower than your 1.060 beer using White Labs 001. Why are you using a scottish yeast for a stout anyway? Will be an interesting combo I'd like to try.

To answer your question, rouse the yeast and give it another 2 weeks. If nothing changes try to pitch a more attenuative yeast and cross your fingers. Or it'll be sweet enough to call a milk stout



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