New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermeneter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Should I Go Big?




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-20-2013, 03:13 PM   #1
Jonk4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 27
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Should I Go Big?

So I have two extract brews under my belt. The first one not so great, but it is getting better after sitting in the bottle. The second is the 15 Minute Pale Ale recipe and is pretty good. My question is this: should I do a couple of easy brews or should I try my hand at a Belgian Tripel or Russian Imperial Stout. My first two were about 5% ABV and I kind of want to make a 9% or 10%. Is this wise to do after two brews and should I refine my techniques or should I dive in and make a challenging brew?



__________________

Just Bottled:Sea Warrior Barleywine, Citra Pale Ale
Primary: Oktoberfest, Cider
Jonk4 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2013, 03:26 PM   #2
RedOktoberfest
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Fairfield County, CT
Posts: 411
Liked 26 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Do you have oxygenation/aeration and yeast starters figured out?



__________________
RedOktoberfest is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2013, 03:28 PM   #3
mikescooling
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 1,584
Liked 198 Times on 152 Posts
Likes Given: 176

Default

yea, go head. A good stout may take some time to smooth out (like 8 months aging). Most new brewers want to drink their beer after a week. But yea go head and have some fun. IMHO I'd stick to a proven recipe for now.

__________________
mikescooling is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2013, 03:39 PM   #4
jonnyp1980
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Kittery, Maine
Posts: 759
Liked 43 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I agree with mike. Have fun and do you research. A big stout should be ready by the end of fall.

__________________
Subscribe to our youtube channel where we review your beer, dicuss brewing tips, and share your recipe. Cheers


http://www.youtube.com/user/HomebrewersReview?feature=watch
jonnyp1980 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2013, 04:01 PM   #5
chickypad
lupulin shift victim
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
chickypad's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: SF Peninsula
Posts: 2,311
Liked 209 Times on 185 Posts
Likes Given: 95

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedOktoberfest View Post
Do you have oxygenation/aeration and yeast starters figured out?
^ This. You need to pay attention to yeast health on a big beer. Really the biggest difference from regular gravity brews IMO. If you can do that, go for it!
__________________
chickypad is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2013, 04:18 PM   #6
splattsmier
Burton Brewhouse
Feedback Score: 10 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Conroe, Texas
Posts: 478
Liked 119 Times on 83 Posts
Likes Given: 209

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikescooling View Post
yea, go head. A good stout may take some time to smooth out (like 8 months aging). Most new brewers want to drink their beer after a week. But yea go head and have some fun. IMHO I'd stick to a proven recipe for now.
+1

IMO homebrewing should be about having fun and enjoying your beer. If you like big beers, go for it. Definitely do some research regarding pitch rates and nutrient needs to keep your little yeasties happy. And I agree with Mike: stick with a proven recipe first, and experiment with your own designs after nailing down your processes.Good luck!
__________________
Untappd me: splattsmier

Untappd my homebrew: BurtonBrewhouse

MY CELLAR: http://www.cellarhq.com/cellar/ScottyP

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy-Klubb View Post
"They can try to pry the mash paddle from my cold, dead hands."
splattsmier is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2013, 04:28 PM   #7
kh54s10
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Tiverton, Rhode Island
Posts: 5,937
Liked 481 Times on 407 Posts
Likes Given: 129

Default

I would go with a good quality kit. I like Northern Brewer and Austin Homebrew Supply. Watch your fermentation temperature and keep it in the mid sixties (wort temperature not ambient). If you use liquid yeast, make a proper sized starter. With dry it might take a couple of packs and you should probably re-hydrate for big beers.

__________________
kh54s10 is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2013, 06:23 PM   #8
haberdasher
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 65
Liked 9 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

My first ever batch is in bottles now. 1.090 OG Belgian tripel. (10.12FG) 10.2 %abv.... made a starter with wyeast 1214 - the Chimay strain. My whole rationale was why brew if I'm not gonna be making what I would otherwise buy at the store? Where's the satisfaction?

Pre-bottling flavor was amazing, left it in primary a month. It'll need to sit in bottles a month before I even taste it, but not great until even a few more months have gone by. See my thread on the same topic: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/noob-questions-first-brew-ever-1-090-a-417150/

Recipe is in there too.

Good luck!

__________________

On Deck: How Rye I am Rye Saison
Primary: empty
Secondary/dry-hopping: 10G of my Mosaic IPA
Keg 1: empty
Keg 2: Apfelwein

haberdasher is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-20-2013, 06:32 PM   #9
Beernik
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: salt lake city, ut
Posts: 2,423
Liked 203 Times on 173 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

I say go for it. It's a learning experience. For a big extract beer, you might want to consider adding some yeast nutrient to your boil as well as making a starter for the yeast. Both will help reduce the likelihood of a stuck fermentation.

My 2nd beer I added fruit to and my 3rd was a lambic.

I always like to have a 6 - 12 month project beer or wine going.

Just remember that beers over 8% take more time to mellow and to carbonate in bottles.

__________________
Thank you Lego Movie for letting me know that I'm the serious, unfun, mean dad who never lets his kids play with his toys.

On deck: Barleywine, Dampfbier, Belgain Golden Ale, Hazelnut Sweet Stout, IRA, Rye-weizen, Wit, Uinta Hazel Clone, Uinta Yard Sale Clone.
Beernik is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-21-2013, 02:22 AM   #10
Cyclman
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Cyclman's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Aurora, CO
Posts: 3,414
Liked 288 Times on 254 Posts
Likes Given: 105

Default

An O2 injector is a good investment for any brewer, so if you're going big, I'd bite that bullet. Pitch properly, oxygenate, and you can make big beer just as easy as a "regular" beer.

Only warning, big beers take time to be great. I did a couple big beers before I had a large pipeline, and found that I drank them up and only the last few bottles had fully developed to their potential.

Brewing is about having fun!



__________________

Give a man a beer, waste an hour. Teach a man to brew, and waste a lifetime! Bill Owen quote

Join the Beacon Point (Aurora, CO) Brewclub on Facebook- casual, fun brewing, drinking, socializing, visiting the great breweries / brewpubs in CO!

Cyclman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes