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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Severe effects of Oxidation?
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Old 09-20-2010, 03:15 PM   #1
Valcarde
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Default Severe effects of Oxidation?

I bottled my Raspberry Wheat beer over this weekend, and I think I may have run into a problem.

Primary ferment went fine. Racked onto a secondary with 2lbs of fresh raspberries, left it for 6 days. OG didn't change at all for the last 3 days, bottled on Saturday. This is where the problems started...

Racking to bottling bucket, the racking cane was getting clogged with raspberry seeds. I tried tying a bit of sanitized cheesecloth over the end to filter the raspberry bits; still got clogged after every few moments of racking. After many failed attempts, I wound up having to pour gently from the carboy into a filtered (by cheesecloth) funnel...

So, the question being, how big is the possibility of bad oxidation? If so, how long does it take for oxidation to ruin a beer? Drink it fast, or give it the 'should be better later' long stay in a bottle?

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Old 09-20-2010, 03:21 PM   #2
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I've heard a lot of talk here about oxidation but have never heard any homebrewer ever encountering it. You'll be fine

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Old 09-20-2010, 03:59 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by phatuna View Post
I've heard a lot of talk here about oxidation but have never heard any homebrewer ever encountering it. You'll be fine
Want to taste my first batch? I actually still have one bottle left at the back of my fridge, which I cannot bring myself to drink because it is so badly oxidized, hahahaha.

I think the OP definitely runs the risk, but I wouldn't worry until you taste it! In some beers, a bit of oxidation is actually desirable.
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Old 09-20-2010, 04:07 PM   #4
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I've heard a lot of talk here about oxidation but have never heard any homebrewer ever encountering it. You'll be fine
I had an Irish Red that went bad because of oxidation. Musty, cardboard, stale odor and flavor. It took a couple of months before it showed up though. Had some air leaking in my bottling wand.

My advice to the OP is to have a party, drink it fast, then re-brew!
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Old 09-20-2010, 05:20 PM   #5
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If you introduced oxygen, "drink it fast" is probably a good rule of thumb. You won't see bad effects of oxidation in the short term. Put some age, probably 6+ months on the bottles and you would probably start to notice the oxidation. Once the beer is bottled and carbed it would be a good idea to get it all into a refrigerator. Since oxidaton chemical reactions happen 2x faster for every 10C increase in temp, getting them as cool as possible will seriously slow down oxidation reactions.

While what you did wasn't the best for the beer, you sometime just have to "do what you have to do" to get the job done. I had to stick my arm in the bottling bucket one time to tighten the spigot.

phatuna - yes, oxidation is absolutely a concern to homebrewers. It sometimes tends to show less often since our beer isn't put on hot trucks, shipped across the country, put in hot warehouses etc. It can and does happen though.

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Old 09-20-2010, 05:25 PM   #6
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If it's a wheat beer, you'll want to drink it young anyway. Give it a couple weeks to carb up, and try it out. You'll probably have at least a couple months before you start to notice any off flavors. I just recently opened a bottle of one of the first batches I did that was over a year old, and it had just started to develop some stale/cardboard flavors. I'm sure you'll be fine as long as you don't keep the batch around for 6+ months.

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Old 09-20-2010, 05:33 PM   #7
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My first batch I oxidized the living crap out of it (i.e. I didn't have siphoning equipment so I bottled using a ladle and a funnel). And it took me about a month or so to drink the beer.

One bottle seemed to go bad after about a month, but the others were all great. I'm still a newbie but I think as long as you drink it in a reasonable time frame you'll be fine.

Edit: Also I must note that the one bottle that went bad was a plastic water bottle -- everything that was in glass would have probably lasted for a while longer.

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Old 09-20-2010, 05:43 PM   #8
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Looks like I'll just have to give it 2-3 weeks to carb, and get to drinkin'.

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Old 09-20-2010, 05:52 PM   #9
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It takes a lot of splashing to do any damage, someone on basic brewing years ago, (Palmer, or Chris Colby of BYO) said that in order to truly provide enough O2 to oxydize our beers it would take pumping an entire one of our red oxygen bottle/airstones into our beer AFTER fermentation is complete.

Most of the splashing intentional or accidental that we do in the course of our brewing will not harm it...

That doesn't mean you want to dump your carboy into the bottling bucket, or do other careless things. You still want to be gentle when moving your beer from vessel to vessel.

BUT it does mean that if we spalsh, or have to use our autosiphon to pump our beer is something goes wrong, that we don't need to panic about it.

I've had all sorts of problems, like bottling a blond ale with peaches in it,that kept jamming the bottling wand and auto siphon, and the beer's still turned out just fine.

And beside Oxygenation damage isn't immediate anyway, most of us would have our beer drunk long before it would happen.
I had some major f-ups with bottling on occasion and still haven't oxydized a batch.

I would just rdwhahb while you read this thread written just for you...

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/what...t-great-96780/

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Old 09-20-2010, 06:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
It takes a lot of splashing to do any damage, someone on basic brewing years ago, (Palmer, or Chris Colby of BYO) said that in order to truly provide enough O2 to oxydize our beers it would take pumping an entire one of our red oxygen bottle/airstones into our beer AFTER fermentation is complete.

Most of the splashing intentional or accidental that we do in the course of our brewing will not harm it...

That doesn't mean you want to dump your carboy into the bottling bucket, or do other careless things. You still want to be gentle when moving your beer from vessel to vessel.

BUT it does mean that if we spalsh, or have to use our autosiphon to pump our beer is something goes wrong, that we don't need to panic about it.

I've had all sorts of problems, like bottling a blond ale with peaches in it,that kept jamming the bottling wand and auto siphon, and the beer's still turned out just fine.

And beside Oxygenation damage isn't immediate anyway, most of us would have our beer drunk long before it would happen.
I had some major f-ups with bottling on occasion and still haven't oxydized a batch.

I would just rdwhahb while you read this thread written just for you...

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/what...t-great-96780/
I figured I'd get a Revvy post

I've read that thread a number of times already, so I guess I was more curious then I was really worried. Either way, I think the next time I make this beer, I'm going to put the raspberries in a thin layer of sanitized cheesecloth to make the removal that much easier; reach in with sterilized tongs, grab bag, pull out!
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