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Old 02-11-2008, 06:21 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by libs
I've had a stuck fermentation in the past, and here's how I got past it.

1. Aquarium aerator. Cost me about $5 to get the set-up at the pet store. Sanitize - submerge - and let it go for 5 - 10 minutes.

2. Yeast nutrient I bought at the LHBS. It was less than $2.

I did both of these things at the same time, and it kicked back off immediatlly.

The only recomendation I have for next time is to use a starter - expecially with dry yeast.

Good luck!
Whoa there! I really don't recommend aerating your beer after some fermentation has occured. That's where you get nasty oxidation off-flavours. By all means stir up your fermenting beer to get yeast back into suspension, but avoid all aeration, splashing, aquarium bubbles, etc.
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Old 02-11-2008, 06:21 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bradsul
You definitely do not want a starter with dry yeast. Liquid yeast absolutely but dry yeast should just be rehydrated as per the manufacturer's directions.
Would it be BEST to rehyrdrate then make a starter out of that? (the dry yeast)

I've read it seems to be benificial to always make a starter. I've only used liquid yeast so far, and did make a starter with that.
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Old 02-11-2008, 06:28 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riored4v
Would it be BEST to rehyrdrate then make a starter out of that? (the dry yeast)

I've read it seems to be benificial to always make a starter. I've only used liquid yeast so far, and did make a starter with that.
A starter isn't necessary for dry yeast (and in fact can be detrimental) as there is already enough viable yeast cells for pitching a standard batch. Simply rehydrating is sufficient to ensure proper cell counts. Liquid yeast packs (despite what they say) do not have enough cells to adequately pitch most beers and you will always want to make a starter.

Mr. Malty has a great pitching rate calculator.
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Old 02-11-2008, 06:45 PM   #14
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thanks man. i'll check out that calculator later since it's blocked right now at work.

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Old 02-12-2008, 12:53 AM   #15
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It's been 5 or 6 hours after I added the yeast nutrient and I don't see any change. I'm guessing there's not enough oxygen in the wort. Am I going to get much oxidation if I pitch new yeast that's been dissolved in heavily aerated water?

Is oxidation even a big deal if you plan on drinking the stuff in the next month or two?

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Old 02-12-2008, 01:12 AM   #16
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Yeast nutrient won't help once the growth phase is completed.

Rehydrate your new yeast using boiled and cooled water (this will drive off all the O2). Bring your beer up to 70-72F before you pitch your newly hydrated yeast to make sure that the yeast will be nice and active once they hit the wort.

If you want to take the risk for oxidation, by all means go ahead, it's your beer after all. Personally I would avoid it. Pitch your new yeast and if after 4 or 5 days it's not dropped any farther, I'd say it's going to go as far as it can and your beer is done. Not all extracts are as fermentable as others, that's why FG targets are just estimates.

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Old 02-12-2008, 02:32 PM   #17
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And by all means, use something other than Munton's. Even Munton's gold will attenuate better.

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Old 02-12-2008, 03:40 PM   #18
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Too late. I did it just like bradsul said. I used the same muntons yeast as I did originally. I thought using two different kinds of yeasts could be a problem. It's definitely better than it was, but it's still slow. Hopefully it's alright. Is any yeast OK to use as long as it's ale yeast?

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Old 02-12-2008, 04:54 PM   #19
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In the future you'll want to pick yourself up some Nottingham dry yeast just to keep in the fridge. The muntons yeasts really aren't very good.

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Old 02-13-2008, 12:19 AM   #20
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I just picked up a california common for my next brew. It came with a wyeast smack pack. I quit going to the local brewing shop. They keep their yeast on a shelf at room temp and their prices are higher than Northern Brewer where I got the new stuff from.

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