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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Risk of autolysis in a 3 week fermentation
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Old 12-13-2012, 01:47 AM   #21
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I think people are taking the "no secondary" thing too far. Autolysis is a real thing and it can happen on a 5gal batch...probably not with 1056 but try leaving 1318 london 3 for a month on the yeast cake and taste the "mythical" yeast bite. That said, I don't think 1318 needs a secondary but when its done get it off the yeast because 3 weeks is way too long...but package and drink it, don't stick it in another carboy. Even english yeasts that aren't autolysis prone don't do well if left for weeks on the yeast cake after fermentation is done- 1968 will chew up all the malty goodness and english character once its done fermenting.

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Old 12-13-2012, 01:56 PM   #22
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I can't say about 1968 because I don't use it, but I do use a LOT of WLP002, and I've definitely left ESBs, English IPAs and porters on the yeast cake for upwards of a month, and had absolutely zero issues with autolysis. In fact, I think the porter I left on the cake for six weeks (I was traveling and couldn't get home to rack) was one of the best I've made. Moral of the story: YMMV.

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Old 12-13-2012, 03:59 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerrodm View Post
I can't say about 1968 because I don't use it, but I do use a LOT of WLP002, and I've definitely left ESBs, English IPAs and porters on the yeast cake for upwards of a month, and had absolutely zero issues with autolysis. In fact, I think the porter I left on the cake for six weeks (I was traveling and couldn't get home to rack) was one of the best I've made. Moral of the story: YMMV.

Cheers
I haven't had autolysis issues with 1968 but it will often continue fermenting far past the 70% attentuation advertised for the strain resulting in a very clean beer. Not necessarily bad but you will lose everything that makes the strain unique. here is a great thread discussing british yeasts http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/bri...oughts-221817/
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Old 12-13-2012, 08:20 PM   #24
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I haven't had autolysis issues with 1968 but it will often continue fermenting far past the 70% attentuation advertised for the strain resulting in a very clean beer. Not necessarily bad but you will lose everything that makes the strain unique. here is a great thread discussing british yeasts http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/bri...oughts-221817/
Yeah I guess I could see that. I tend to mash my British styles a little on the higher side so I don't worry too much about over-attenuation. I especially like a higher temp mash with WLP007, which I think gives a great full british flavor but without getting too sweet.
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Old 12-15-2012, 11:55 AM   #25
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Hi guys, back here. Well, passed that thing with autolisis i'm here to share the progress of the beer. Today, almost 7 days fermenting, i took another gravity reading, and got 1.036 (it started on 1.082) and the trub has settled. I took a sip of it, and it tasted a little bit like wine, astringent, and alcoholic.

I don't know, I expected a gravity a little lower, maybe in the range of the 20's, and would like to know if this flavor it's normal for such a young beer.

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Old 12-15-2012, 12:37 PM   #26
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With that high of a starting gravity, your beer isn't done fermenting at 7 days. Try a gravity reading at 3 weeks and see what you get and what it tastes like.

The temperature of the fermenting wort makes a huge difference in the flavor. Find out the temperature range your yeast strain likes and keep the fermenter near the bottom of that range at first because at the higher temperature the yeast give off flavors and fusel alcohol which will give a "hot alcohol" taste. The trick I've learned is to start the ferment as close to the coolest the yeast prefer and after a week let it warm to room temperature or warmer to encourage the yeast to finish the ferment.

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Old 12-15-2012, 02:58 PM   #27
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With that high of a starting gravity, your beer isn't done fermenting at 7 days. Try a gravity reading at 3 weeks and see what you get and what it tastes like.
Yeah, i'm aware that the fermentation process is not done yet. But i could say that the primary fermentation is done judging by that drop in gravity and the trub having settled?

I'm planning leaving it fermenting along with the yeast cake for another 2 weeks, then rack it and bottled for carbonation and conditioning, taking more 2 weeks on this.
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Old 12-15-2012, 07:26 PM   #28
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Yeah, i'm aware that the fermentation process is not done yet. But i could say that the primary fermentation is done judging by that drop in gravity and the trub having settled?

I'm planning leaving it fermenting along with the yeast cake for another 2 weeks, then rack it and bottled for carbonation and conditioning, taking more 2 weeks on this.
You might want to consider leaving it longer than the 3 weeks total. Remember that this is a high gravity beer and it might take longer because of that.
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Old 12-15-2012, 08:42 PM   #29
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Quote:
You might want to consider leaving it longer than the 3 weeks total. Remember that this is a high gravity beer and it might take longer because of that.
But in that case, would be better change for a secondary fermentor or i could just leave it where it is along with the yeast cake?
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Old 12-15-2012, 08:44 PM   #30
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You might want to consider leaving it longer than the 3 weeks total. Remember that this is a high gravity beer and it might take longer because of that.
But in that case, would be better transfer the beer to a second fermentor or could i leave it where it is, along with the yeast cake?
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