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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Reducing sediment
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Old 10-13-2010, 06:29 PM   #1
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Default Reducing sediment

Anyone have any tips on how to reduce the amount of sediment post-boil?

Thanks,
Cris P.

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Old 10-13-2010, 06:32 PM   #2
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If your talking about trub ending up in your fermenter, try whirlpooling by stirring with a spoon for a minute or two, then letting the wort rest for 10 minutes. This will encourage the trub to fall into a cone formation in the bottom center of the kettle. Then carefully transfer your wort into the fermenter. Not knowing your setup, its hard to tell.

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Old 10-13-2010, 06:35 PM   #3
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Are you talking about the hops, hot and cold break at the bottom of the kettle after the boil? More sediment there is a good thing, since you've precipitated unwanted proteins in the wort. You'll end up with less of that if you have a weaker boil and use less hops, but neither of those is really a good solution. That said, I don't filter any of it out. I just dump it all into the carboy and let it settle out on its own. I rack off of the sediment and end up with a nice, clear beer.

If you're talking about the sediment left after fermentation, that consists of the same stuff plus flocculated yeast. There really isn't a way to reduce that either.

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Old 10-13-2010, 06:36 PM   #4
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As far as the break material (a/k/a trub) there's not a whole lot that you can do about it. Obvioiusly, you don't want to have a ton of trub in your fermenter, and you should follow Nano's advice. Otherwise, you can transfer you beer to a primary, wait for the trub to fall out of suspension and gently siphon off of what settled out (which is not adviseable).

A little bit of trub is good for the yeast, since it contains some fatty nutrients that helps them through their life cycle.

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Old 10-13-2010, 06:45 PM   #5
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I've also heard whirl-pooling is a very effective way.
I put my hops in a mesh bag and run the wort through a double fine mesh strainer before it goes in the carboy. This still leaves a good amount of trub in the carboy.

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Old 10-13-2010, 07:50 PM   #6
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See I used to use a strainer but found it to be more trouble than it's worth.

How can I reduce the sediment in my bottling bucket when transferring from primary to bottling bucket? I've tried to let the primary sit for a couple hours before siphoning, but I don't know :/

Thanks!

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Old 10-13-2010, 08:00 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s2cmpugh View Post
See I used to use a strainer but found it to be more trouble than it's worth.

How can I reduce the sediment in my bottling bucket when transferring from primary to bottling bucket? I've tried to let the primary sit for a couple hours before siphoning, but I don't know :/

Thanks!
Well, the first key is to leave it sit longer. Leaving it in the fermenter for three weeks or so really helps to make a more compact trub layer.

Secondly, use a more flocculant yeast strain like nottingham or S04. Those strains form a tightly compacted yeast cake once they finish up, making it very easy to not suck up any trub.

Last, careful racking really helps. Moving the fermenter the night before you rack is helpful so that any thing stirred up can resettle overnight, and then minimize movement when you get ready to siphon. I start the siphon in the middle of the fermenter, and gently lower it as the level of the beer drops until I'm just barely above the trub. Once I start sucking up yeast (you can see the color change in the siphon tubing), I stop.
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Old 10-14-2010, 03:44 PM   #8
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Thanks guys for all the help! I'll try some of those tips next time around.

Cris P.

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Old 10-14-2010, 03:47 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper_Brew View Post
Well, the first key is to leave it sit longer. Leaving it in the fermenter for three weeks or so really helps to make a more compact trub layer.

Secondly, use a more flocculant yeast strain like nottingham or S04. Those strains form a tightly compacted yeast cake once they finish up, making it very easy to not suck up any trub.

Last, careful racking really helps. Moving the fermenter the night before you rack is helpful so that any thing stirred up can resettle overnight, and then minimize movement when you get ready to siphon. I start the siphon in the middle of the fermenter, and gently lower it as the level of the beer drops until I'm just barely above the trub. Once I start sucking up yeast (you can see the color change in the siphon tubing), I stop.

+1... except I tilt my bucket slightly by placing a thick book or something else and place my siphon opposite to where the trub settles...
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Old 10-14-2010, 03:58 PM   #10
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Thats why I use a bright tank and cold crash before bottling...nicely carbed and very little gunk in the bottles.

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