Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Recipe Formulation & Ingredients Descriptions
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-14-2011, 05:52 PM   #61
Justibone
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,023
Liked 21 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 69

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCharles View Post
If I'm not mistaking, the percent, such as 75%, relates to the expected sugar extraction from the grain. I am more in doubt about the specific gravity.
To me it seems that the percentage is the maximum possible fermentables you can extract from the grain, the gravity column is the maximum gravity you could get from one pound of grain in one gallon of wort.

Quote:
the SRM Colum is colored from yellow to brown.
SRM - Home Brewing Wiki

SRM simply refers to color. Low numbers are light, high numbers are dark. There is very little difference in the high numbers (between 100 and 200, for example) but big differences in the small numbers (between 10 and 20, for example).

Quote:
My last question deals with the term Mash. Some malts require the Mash process when others do not? I would have thought all grains would have to be processed in a Mash Tun. Is the mash process adding hot water for about 60 minutes? I may be getting the terms Mash and Sparge mixed up.
Most grains that add fermentables must be mashed. Mashing is enzymatic conversion of starches to sugars. Mashing is usually done between 140-155 degrees F, with roughly 1-2 quarts per pound of grain.

Steeping is used when a grain adds flavor or color, but not fermentables. An example might be Chocolate grain, or Roasted grain.

Steeping is also used with the Cara- grains, which have already been converted to sugar inside their grain husks, and merely need to be steeped in order to get the sugar into solution.

Sparging is just rinsing the grain to get some more sugars off of it.
Justibone is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2011, 06:25 PM   #62
PCharles
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Morganton, NC
Posts: 36
Default

Your discussion of mash vs steeping helped a lot. Referring back to the chart, Malted Oats (near the top of the list) does not have a check next to Mash Required. They still list a yield and SG. Perhaps my question should have been what does the Mash Req field mean? Can malted oats be used to flavor alone if not mashed or be used to ferment with if they are mashed?

You did make a good point though. I understand that there are some grains added for the purpose of adding flavor and aroma, not for fermentation.

Referring back to the potential yield, if the expected SG is 1.035, am I correct that sugar would be added to bring the SG up to about 1.050 to achieve a higher alcohol %? I would be surprised if a recipe would start with an SG that low.

__________________
PCharles is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2011, 02:12 PM   #63
helibrewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
helibrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 3,490
Liked 250 Times on 219 Posts
Likes Given: 62

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCharles View Post
Your discussion of mash vs steeping helped a lot. Referring back to the chart, Malted Oats (near the top of the list) does not have a check next to Mash Required. They still list a yield and SG. Perhaps my question should have been what does the Mash Req field mean? Can malted oats be used to flavor alone if not mashed or be used to ferment with if they are mashed?
If mashing is required that means that the starches in the grain need to be converted into fermentable sugars through enzyme activity.

Quote:
You did make a good point though. I understand that there are some grains added for the purpose of adding flavor and aroma, not for fermentation.
Quote:
Referring back to the potential yield, if the expected SG is 1.035, am I correct that sugar would be added to bring the SG up to about 1.050 to achieve a higher alcohol %? I would be surprised if a recipe would start with an SG that low.
Remember that the reference is for 1 pound in 1 gallon. By increasing the ratio of grains to liquid you increase the SG. So 5 pounds of grain in a 5 gallon final volume would be about 1.035, but 8 pounds of grain in a 5 gallon final volume would be higher...I'm guessing but probably in the mid 1.050's

I come from a wine background also and the OG's and FG's you see in brewing are nothing like what we see in wine making. By the way, if you have a refractometer it can be used in brewing instead of a hydrometer with a simple conversion to account for alcohol.
__________________
Something is always fermenting....
"It's Bahl Hornin'"

Primary:
Brite Tank/Lagering:
Kegged: Hefeweizen, Chocolate Hazelnut Porter, Kumquat Saison, Tart Cherry Cider, Belgian Tripel, Maibock Bock, Ommegang Abbey Ale Clone, Belgian Golden Strong, German Pils (WLP830)
Bottled: Belgian Quad (Grand Reserve), Derangement (Belgian Dark Strong)
On Deck:
My Site: www.restlesscellars.com
helibrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-14-2012, 05:35 PM   #64
ExplosiveJoseph
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Binghamton, NY
Posts: 26
Default

Hi all, I'm still trying to work on recipe formulation but am finding it difficult to decide on which grains work well with some while other grains would be best. This is an Irish Red Rye I'm working on. I'm not going for a traditional Irish red, I'd like a hint of American hops with a solid rye backbone. This is what I have so far. Please make any corrections or flat out criticism if you can.
Its a partial mash recipe:
2 lb 6 Row
1lb flaked Rye
1lb Pilsner Malt
4 oz Crystal 120
6.6 Amber LME
1oz Willamette at 60min
.5oz Citra at 30min
.5oz Citra at 15min
.5oz EKG at 15min
Irish ale yeast

I think it's pretty much what I want but I could be missing something.

__________________
ExplosiveJoseph is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-16-2012, 11:58 AM   #65
Justibone
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,023
Liked 21 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 69

Default

ABV% is going to be on the high side. High alcohol means you should age it, so you are going to lose some hop aroma. I'd back off on the LME a couple of lbs.

Citra at 30 min. is a waste, IMO. I really like the Citra aroma, but as only half aroma, half bitterness I think it has a better use later in the boil.

Crystal 120 is pretty dark. I think it has a raisin taste. I'd go a bit lighter, but that's me.

I also think that rye is kind of spicy, kind of sharp. I like the Citra, but the EKG... IMO you're trying to mix the classic with the new. I'd say commit in either direction, but don't muddle it. I like where you're going with the Citra, though, so if I had a vote (and I don't), I'd go in that direction entirely. My $.02 is to skip the EKG and go for more Citra at flameout, but I haven't done the IBU calculations so make sure you would still be balanced for bitterness.

Good luck, and enjoy!

Justibone is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-18-2012, 05:53 PM   #66
smyrnaquince
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Concord, MA
Posts: 569
Liked 18 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathBrewer View Post
Adjuncts and Other Ingredients

Flaked and Raw Adjuncts

These ingredients can come in handy for a large variety of purposes.
Could you mention what effect they have? For example, which one(s) contribute to the mouthfeel if I want a "thick" beer?
__________________
smyrnaquince is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-01-2012, 01:11 AM   #67
TrubHead
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Winter Park, FL
Posts: 305
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Malts_Chart

I'm looking for the percentage of fermentable sugar in malts. I'm not sure if the "Yield" column in the chart above lists that aspect. Clarification is appreciated.
__________________
TrubHead is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-24-2012, 08:06 AM   #68
Diaperload
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 457
Liked 20 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

I noticed in the hop "C" section that you didn't include Chinook. I was wondering why. Is it an offshoot of one of the ones you listed? If so, which one?

__________________

"I'm not saying let's go kill all the stupid people...I'm just saying let's remove all the warning labels and let the problem sort itself out."

Diaperload is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-16-2012, 04:37 PM   #69
julypena
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Posts: 17
Likes Given: 2

Default

Awesome post @DeathBrewer! Took lots of notes

__________________
julypena is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-17-2012, 04:00 AM   #70
jamissr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: louisville, Kentucky
Posts: 28
Default

Much appreciate your posts DB, ive followed your BIAB posts both for Partial Grain and All Grain, i am currently on my 4th batch of AG and loving it.

Not specifically asking you to do it, and i havent had a chance to look through all of the posts on the forums yet, but this would seem to be an appropriate place to list different general mixes of grains/hops. More generalized and high level overview than actual recipeis, something like "munich works well with 2 row but not as well with pilsner and these hops work well with this type" (no clue if thats true about the grains).

not sure if im being clear, or if its even possible, but im trying to figure out what hops to use in different IPAs, and it kinda seems like i can use pretty much anything, but im scared of using too much munich, not enough crystal 60, or 20, not enough citra, or willamette, or maybe those two dont work well together, i dont know. would be nice to understand what hops work together with each other, what grains work together well, and what hops work with what grains. might just have to experiment to figure it out. also maybe i need to just keep reading, that seems to work every other time ive ever posted with a question on any subject

again thanks for all you have done and you have great instructional posts, hope i dont seem like im complaining, just having a hard time figuring out how to make my own recipes, or substitute things in existing recipes.

__________________
jamissr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Recipe formulation ScottM Cider Forum 0 05-04-2009 05:26 PM
First recipe formulation - IPA TheTower Recipes/Ingredients 7 03-06-2009 01:59 PM
help with first recipe formulation - RIS kcinpdx Recipes/Ingredients 3 01-19-2009 01:37 AM
Recipe Formulation Panagiotis Recipes/Ingredients 2 10-27-2008 07:34 PM
Recipe Formulation KnightBrewer Extract Brewing 3 08-15-2008 06:25 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS