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Old 02-21-2010, 05:25 AM   #11
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...and keep your nose over the airlock during fermentation.
Is there anything more rewarding for making beer then to smell that delicious CO2 blow-off coming from a fermentation? I think not.
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Old 02-21-2010, 05:37 AM   #12
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Grain Descriptions6-row Malt: Can be slightly more bready or grainy than Pale Malt, but used in the same way. 2L. Supposedly traditional for a Cream Ale, although I don't always go with it for that style.
I don't know how in depth you want to get in this, but if you want to edit and add as much info as possible, 6-row benefits greatly from a protein rest.

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Pilsner Malt: Very crisp and light colored base malt. 2L. Used as a base for Pilsner, Kölsch, Belgian Beers, and other clean lagers and ales. I use up to 50% for a light German Hefeweizen and for portions of the base in many other beers, including my Irish Rye Stout.
Also can benefit from an acid rest. High pilsner malt amounts contribute to a higher mash pH, no?

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Wheat Malt: A glorious gift of nature
...mmmmmmm

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Carafa II: Adds color with VERY little flavor. Grind it up into a powder to get the most effect from it. You can add it to darken other recipes where you've got the flavor just right (such as making a brown stout black.) This baby is blacker than the blackest black (times infinity)...ok, ok...it's about 400L . Used in a vast amount of my recipes, from Stouts, Dunkelweizens, Dark Lagers, the Black Wit and, of course, the Irish Rye Stout.
I may be wrong, but doesn't carafa I, II, and III all add aroma as well?

Also, I don't see carapils here. I don't know how in depth you want to get with this forum, but I figure you want to add as time goes on.
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Old 02-21-2010, 05:42 AM   #13
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Hops Descriptions
This may just be me talking, but I have always wanted to classify "commercial" hops in a category as well as noble or american. Simcoe is one example. The hop is actually trademarked. Citra may be a new one, and I am not sure if amarillo is the same, but I see a lot of hops that have been trademarked emerging. And boy is simcoe tasty!

Just to get a feel for each type of hop, I make a generic run of the mill 1 gallon amber ale batch, and add one type of hop to it. I usually over hop the beer just to get a good feel of bittering, flavoring, and aroma of each hop. This works really well to get a feel for all the types of hops out there. It is like a liquid sample of the hop.
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Old 02-21-2010, 10:20 AM   #14
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Is there anything more rewarding for making beer then to smell that delicious CO2 blow-off coming from a fermentation? I think not.
Perhaps the end product, but otherwise...no.

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Just in case you haven't heard it in a while, Thanks! Your very informative threads are a great help to me, and I'm sure many others as well.
Always appreciated. I enjoy the back and forth that comes from these threads. Be sure to let me know if you have any questions!

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I don't know how in depth you want to get in this, but if you want to edit and add as much info as possible, 6-row benefits greatly from a protein rest.

Also can benefit from an acid rest. High pilsner malt amounts contribute to a higher mash pH, no?
These issues will be addressed in the mashing section, but I will think about reference in the malt section. It should also be noted that Pilsner Malt should be boiled for 90 minutes to drive off DMS. Thanks for the feedback.

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I may be wrong, but doesn't carafa I, II, and III all add aroma as well?
In larger quantities. I've never used it as such. I've read about it. Let's discuss more. PM me and we'll have a little back and forth and shoot each other references.

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Also, I don't see carapils here. I don't know how in depth you want to get with this forum, but I figure you want to add as time goes on.
I don't use carapils. I think it's more of an extract gig for adding body. I'd love to hear if you have some input on it and what its uses are in regards to mashing (the tutorial is about and going to be entitled "Easy Mashing" from someone's suggestion.) I will add any input you have here if I think it is applicable.

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This may just be me talking, but I have always wanted to classify "commercial" hops in a category as well as noble or american. Simcoe is one example. The hop is actually trademarked. Citra may be a new one, and I am not sure if amarillo is the same, but I see a lot of hops that have been trademarked emerging. And boy is simcoe tasty!
I would consider Simcoe to be a "C" or American hop and it will go in that category. "Lemony" will be the defining characteristic and it is a great hop when used right.

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Just to get a feel for each type of hop, I make a generic run of the mill 1 gallon amber ale batch, and add one type of hop to it. I usually over hop the beer just to get a good feel of bittering, flavoring, and aroma of each hop. This works really well to get a feel for all the types of hops out there. It is like a liquid sample of the hop.
Good idea. Not sure how many of these experiments I'll be doing myself, but I encourage feedback from people who have done them. If I get the chance, I will be performing personal experiments, and add info into here, but I can't do everything with all the current brewing I'm doing so let me know what you've used that in and how it works!
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Old 02-21-2010, 06:45 PM   #15
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Made some updates due to suggestions from agenthucky!

I'll add some more yeast before I take off to get more supplies for brewing today...going to make a stout (not my rye, unfortunately) to hopefully enter in competition at this year's World Cup.

Keep up the feedback!

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Old 02-21-2010, 07:18 PM   #16
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Made some updates due to suggestions from agenthucky!

I'll add some more yeast before I take off to get more supplies for brewing today...going to make a stout (not my rye, unfortunately) to hopefully enter in competition at this year's World Cup.

Keep up the feedback!
I will see if I can parse my ingredients database into a text format to get you started. I'll see what I can do before I bottle my creamy pear ale.
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Old 02-23-2010, 07:45 PM   #17
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Does this seem plausible for a partial mash recipe?

6 lbs super light LME
1 lb CaraAmber
8oz Corn Sugar (Late addition)

Hopped w/ Centennial.
Yeast: Pacman harvested from bottle.

Any clue how this will turn out?

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Old 02-24-2010, 12:14 AM   #18
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Just a thought... I never really saw anything about SMaSHing until I looked through your first tutorials, and the definition that Orfy provided tells what it is, but not a lot more about it.

It may be worth putting in some information in this thread... since it seems like it is a good technique to use in order to identify characteristics of the grains/ hops? I think that it would also give people a means of learning/ identifying the tastes for their own selves (since individual palates differ)?

(Feel free to disregard if you don't think this has a place here )

As always to a great reference tool...

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Old 03-21-2010, 12:47 PM   #19
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DB: just wanted to point out that some people have a jones for honey as an adjunct.

Also on the subject of adjuncts, let me point out that while stout is good (I use canned stout syrup as a base), I generally mash 2# 2 row with 2# one minute flaked oats to give amazing body. YMMV, but my suggestion would be to add that to the flaked oats department.

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Old 03-23-2010, 01:11 AM   #20
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Dammit...just filled out the adjunct section yesterday and it appears it didn't post

Oh well...I got my ducks in a row, I'll type it out now...

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