Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Questions about Secondary Fermentation

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-25-2013, 12:38 PM   #11
DRonco
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 246
Liked 14 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DM3MD157 View Post
So you ferment in the primary for three weeks then bottle, not using a secondary?
FWIW, that's what I do too. Once you get into controlling pitching rates with yeast starters and use some temperature control you can shorten the time a bit. I pitched a 1L starter into a stout and it attenuated in 3 days (1.054 - 1.014). I'll keep for about two weeks total so the yeast can clean up any byproducts. With temp control you can cold crash the fermenter for a couple days before bottling which will really clear it up and compact the cake so you lessen the amount of trub going into the bottle.


Good job on the first brew! Now go plan your next.
__________________
DRonco is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2013, 02:20 PM   #12
DM3MD157
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 44
Likes Given: 1

Default

Thanks for all the help!

So at this point, I need to use a secondary since I am using the bottling bucket as my primary. The question I have is, can I use my 6 gallon glass carboy or should I go purchase a 5 gallon carboy or better bottle for the secondary? I would rather not have to, but I will if I need to!

__________________
DM3MD157 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2013, 02:22 PM   #13
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2727 Times on 1635 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

This is the most asked and discussed topic on here, on a daily basis there are 5 or six treads on this.

This discussion has been thoroughly covered in this thread, it's become the "uber discussion" on this topic.

To Secondary or Not? John Palmer and Jamil Zainasheff Weigh In .

__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2013, 02:27 PM   #14
DRonco
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 246
Liked 14 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DM3MD157 View Post
Thanks for all the help!

So at this point, I need to use a secondary since I am using the bottling bucket as my primary. The question I have is, can I use my 6 gallon glass carboy or should I go purchase a 5 gallon carboy or better bottle for the secondary? I would rather not have to, but I will if I need to!
Generally, you'd want to limit the amount of head space in a secondary. It's thought that too much can oxidize the beer, but some others think that the beer will create enough CO2 to protect it. I'd probably just get another 5 gallon fermenter. Better safe then sorry. Or better yet, get another bottling bucket and you'll have 2 6.5 gallon fermenters and a bottling bucket.
__________________
DRonco is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2013, 02:34 PM   #15
DM3MD157
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 44
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
This is the most asked and discussed topic on here, on a daily basis there are 5 or six treads on this.

This discussion has been thoroughly covered in this thread, it's become the "uber discussion" on this topic.

To Secondary or Not? John Palmer and Jamil Zainasheff Weigh In .
I completely understand and I have read various threads pertaining to it. I just wanted someone to shove me in one direction.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DRonco View Post
Generally, you'd want to limit the amount of head space in a secondary. It's thought that too much can oxidize the beer, but some others think that the beer will create enough CO2 to protect it. I'd probably just get another 5 gallon fermenter. Better safe then sorry. Or better yet, get another bottling bucket and you'll have 2 6.5 gallon fermenters and a bottling bucket.
I will probably just pick up a 5 gallon better bottle. If there is a chance that I'll ruin this beer with a 6 gal secondary, it may be worth just spending 30 bucks on another bottle as insurance. I can always use it later if choose to secondary again.
__________________
DM3MD157 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2013, 02:56 PM   #16
pjj2ba
Look under the recliner
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
pjj2ba's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: State College, Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,427
Liked 192 Times on 158 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

The upshot, as you found out from your two calls to NB, is that there are many ways to do your fermenting and conditioning. There are plus and minuses to both. These pluses and minuses though are different for different people. What some consider a minus, others consider a plus. I'm a firm believer in following whatever process you feel comfortable with. I think this results in better beer, no matter what the procedure you use. If you are comfortable with it, you will do a better job at it. If you are comfortable with the way you make your beer, but are not totally happy with the product, THEN try something different. I'm talking TOTALLY comfortable, no little nagging, this could have been better, etc

Oh, and if you are comfortable with your process and like the results, then don't worry if someone says you are doing it wrong. That would be like someone telling you that your favorite movie, is not really your favorite movie

__________________
On Tap: Ger. Pils, OKZ (std Amer. lager), CZ Pils, Maibock,
Kegged and Aging/Lagering:CAP, CAP II, Wheat lager, Imperial Pilsner, Ger. Pils, OKZ (std Amer. lager), OKZ II (for base malt comparison), light beer - yes, light beer, Belgian IPA, IPA,
Secondary:
Primary: Pale Ale
Brewing soon: Saison
Recently kicked : ( IPA, Bock, Saison,
Pilsner Urquell Master Homebrewer
(1st NYC 2011, 2nd NYC 2012)
P U crowns winners in its inaugural master HB competition
pjj2ba is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2013, 03:22 PM   #17
DRonco
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 246
Liked 14 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pjj2ba View Post
The upshot, as you found out from your two calls to NB, is that there are many ways to do your fermenting and conditioning. There are plus and minuses to both. These pluses and minuses though are different for different people. What some consider a minus, others consider a plus. I'm a firm believer in following whatever process you feel comfortable with. I think this results in better beer, no matter what the procedure you use. If you are comfortable with it, you will do a better job at it. If you are comfortable with the way you make your beer, but are not totally happy with the product, THEN try something different. I'm talking TOTALLY comfortable, no little nagging, this could have been better, etc

Oh, and if you are comfortable with your process and like the results, then don't worry if someone says you are doing it wrong. That would be like someone telling you that your favorite movie, is not really your favorite movie
Preach it!
__________________
DRonco is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2013, 03:49 PM   #18
DM3MD157
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 44
Likes Given: 1

Default

So my plan of action is: Primary for 2 weeks, then transfer to secondary. Dry hop right away and keep it in the secondary for 2 more weeks before bottling. Sound reasonable?

__________________
DM3MD157 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2013, 04:12 PM   #19
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 6,507
Liked 713 Times on 599 Posts
Likes Given: 226

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DM3MD157 View Post
So my plan of action is: Primary for 2 weeks, then transfer to secondary. Dry hop right away and keep it in the secondary for 2 more weeks before bottling. Sound reasonable?
I'd probably use a shorter period for the dry hopping, maybe a week. Some people have reported a grassy flavor from leaving the hop in the beer too long while others say they routinely leave them 2 weeks. Heck, Mac and Jack's brewing company in Washington put a bag of hops in the keg when they ship it out to the pubs. Makes me wonder how long it takes to empty a key and if it ever gets grassy?
__________________
RM-MN is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-25-2013, 04:57 PM   #20
brewinchef_fairfax
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
brewinchef_fairfax's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 197
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts

Default

Here's my take - not that I have all the answers either... Just an opinion.

I like the idea of a secondary for a few reasons. One is mostly clarity. Two is that I want to pull the beer off the trub sooner - because of reason #1. I also happen to feel that some of the more astringent flavors develop when the beer sits on the trub any longer than it really has to. I'm not a fan of really hopped up beer so I like to pull it off sooner. That's just me.

As long as you're really good with sanitation and you don't oxygenate the beer in the transfer process there's really nothing to worry about as far as bugs and germs getting in.

The reason it is recommended to transfer to secondary after 7 days (if you choose to do so) is so that the beer is still fermenting strong enough to develop enough co2 to push the oxygen out of the head space in the secondary - so a 6.5 is fine as long as you transfer early while there is still some good fermentation activity.

You're going to find a lot of people who disagree with this method simply because it's not the way THEY do it. But it's the way I do mine. If I had a beer that went 2 or 3 weeks in the primary then I would just go direct to bottling provided the yeast had attenuated and my hydrometer readings were in spec.

But - in a nutshell - if you want to pull your beer off the trub for the the purpose of clarity in the final product (and there's much debate about the need for this) just make sure you do it after 7 days and you'll be fine in a 5 or 6.5 gallon secondary. The popular opinion is to just skip the secondary all together and be careful not to stir up the trub when you go to bottle in three weeks. But for me - I'll always take the extra step for the reasons I've mentioned here.

It might not be right in some circles - but it's how and why I do it to mine and I've been very pleased with the results. Depending on the style of beer you may find reasons to do things differently from time to time. But my core belief is that the beer has what it needs after a week in primary and a finer more refined product is easier to achieve when it's transferred off the trub initially and then transferred off of the secondary accumulations again when you go to bottle - essentially taking 3 steps in the clarification process.

There are certainly additional risks when doing it this way - but I'm a sanitation freak and it doesn't scare me. Being clean and detailed in the process is the key. I'm sure there are many who don't or wont take the extra steps and consider them unnecessary. That doesn't make them wrong or me wrong.

We all just have different ways of doing things.

__________________
brewinchef_fairfax is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Secondary Fermentation Questions Seanery Fermentation & Yeast 12 11-02-2011 06:06 PM
Secondary Fermentation Questions bschindl Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 09-04-2010 03:22 PM
Two questions on secondary fermentation taa800 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 06-20-2010 12:19 PM
Secondary Fermentation Questions kriso77 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 17 02-07-2010 02:44 AM
Questions about secondary fermentation RascalKing Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 18 11-03-2009 07:20 PM