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Old 10-15-2009, 10:41 PM   #1
loh777
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Default Proofing yeast

Can someone just reassure me that I did this properly. I took about a cup of water and heated it up to around 100 degrees. Added the yeast packet and let it sit while my wort was cooling in the cold water bath. Once the wort was cooled enough I poured it into the fermenting bucket, and added the proofed yeast from the cup. As far as I know the yeast was active there was a foam on the top of the cup that I mixed it in. It has been 24 hours and I haven't seen any bubbles yet, but I am patiently waiting.

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Old 10-15-2009, 10:54 PM   #2
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You should be fine. Ideally, you should have boiled your water, then allow it to cool to 100 degrees, but I wouldn't fret. As far as not seeing any bubbles, give it another day or two. If you don't see any signs of fermentation after 48 hours, then I would consider taking a hydrometer reading to see if the SG has dropped at all (assuming you are fermenting in a plastic bucket and therefore cannot visually observe activity).

For future brews, can I suggest you switch to liquid yeast? They are even easier to use than dry, tend (and I'm generalizing) to be of higher quality, and come in a greater variety of strains, thus giving you more control over the flavor of your beer.

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Old 10-15-2009, 11:22 PM   #3
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i agree with hercher. its not uncommon for fermentation to take a little while to get under way especially with dry yeast.

just because your not seeing bubbles doesn't mean that there isn't any fermentation. put your ear near the fermenter, if you have good enough hearing you should be able to hear a crackling sound. thats the CO2 bubbles coming to the surface. if your using a bucket check the seals. just because you think the lid is on tight doesn't mean that it actually is. use a mallet to knock it in place.

if you cant hear the fermentation and you are 100% sure the seals are tight and you cant see fermentation within about 2 - 3 days you have a few options. check the gravity see if its dropped any. if there is a ring of crud above the water line then you may of missed the fermentation. you could try moving the fermenter to a warmer place (upper 60s F), add more yeast, add some yeast nutrient.

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Old 10-15-2009, 11:27 PM   #4
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I just checked and the temp is around 65 is that to cold?

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Old 10-15-2009, 11:32 PM   #5
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No, you should be fine at 65. It wouldn't hurt to move it to an area that is 68-72 for the first night (or even for the entire fermentation, depending on the style of beer), but 65 is fine. I think really all you need to do is wait a little longer.

If you are sure there is no fermentation after 48 hours, then simply obtain more yeast and add that. In the meantime, have a homebrew (or locally produced microbrew, if you don't have any homemade stuff).

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Old 10-16-2009, 01:49 AM   #6
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According to the manufacturers foam is no indication that the yeast is active, but you followed the directions and there's about a 99.9% chance things will fine.

Also, no bubbles in the airlock are more likely to mean you don't have a good seal.

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