Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > procedures for kegging?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-24-2006, 01:35 AM   #1
rdwj
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rdwj's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Plainfield, IL
Posts: 4,594
Liked 19 Times on 14 Posts

Default procedures for kegging?

Let me start by saying that I'm just in the research phase of brewing. I haven't purchased a single piece of equipment yet, but don't mind spending a little more to get it right from the start.

I'm thinking that I'd rather keg beer than bottle it. I've read all the beginner guides and done some other searches for kegging information and haven't really found the answers I'm looking for, so I figured I'd ask.

I'm using the John Palmer guide for starters. What do I have to do differently to keg beer?

Also, if there are any basic steps or tips I can add to this guide right off the bad, I'd greatly appreciate the advice.

__________________
rdwj is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 02:08 AM   #2
Spyk'd
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Spyk'd's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Waveland, MS
Posts: 1,017
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Kegging will cut out an entire day of your brewing routine. You just rack into the keg, pressurize to carbonate, then pressurize to serve. About a week after kegging, you're enjoying your brew....


Ok, disclaimer: Your beer will taste better with a week or two beyond that, but you get the idea. Kegging is a ton easier and a hell of alot sexier, when you can pull yourself a pint of draught in your own house.


Welcome to the dark side!

__________________
Primary:
Bleach
Secondary:
American Red
Keg Conditioning:
Gruit
On Tap:
ESB
Bottled:
Nada...
On Deck:
Porter, Belgian Abbey Ale
Spyk'd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 02:32 AM   #3
chask31
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: New York
Posts: 296
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Wow spyk'd from the looks of your signature...you must be real thirsty...

__________________

Tap #1: Cucumber Honey Wheat Ale
Tap #2: Rye Ale
Primary #1: empty
Primary #2: empty
On Deck: Wit

chask31 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 02:42 AM   #4
Spyk'd
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Spyk'd's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Waveland, MS
Posts: 1,017
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chask31
Wow spyk'd from the looks of your signature...you must be real thirsty...

If you must know, I'm currently sneaking some cider. You see, I made a six gallon batch to accomodate the yeast sediment, to allow for testing, and to allow me to top off my five gallon secondary. What say you we do with the surplus? Why drink it I say!


But yeah, I hit a bit of a 'bump' a few weeks ago and am just now getting back on track. I brew tomorrow!
__________________
Primary:
Bleach
Secondary:
American Red
Keg Conditioning:
Gruit
On Tap:
ESB
Bottled:
Nada...
On Deck:
Porter, Belgian Abbey Ale
Spyk'd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 02:07 PM   #5
rdwj
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rdwj's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Plainfield, IL
Posts: 4,594
Liked 19 Times on 14 Posts

Default

Thanks for the reply Spyk'd, I appreciate it. I'm still very green, so I hope you don't mind me asking some follow-up questions.

From what I gather, you're saying that I should go right from the carboy to the keg. Is that right? Is there a need for secondary?


I'm hoping for a little more detail on this too
"You just rack into the keg, pressurize to carbonate, then pressurize to serve. "

Can you explain how I pressurize to carbonate in detail? Do I prime right in the keg? How long? Do I leave it un-pressurized for a while before pressurizing to serve?

Then, once I pressurize to serve, I assume it's good to drink, right?

Lastly, are there options in kegging or is the korny keg about the best option for beginners?

__________________
rdwj is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 02:46 PM   #6
sailman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Rocky Mount NC
Posts: 200
Default

try this link... http://www.northernbrewer.com/docs/html/corny-keg.html and this... http://www.leeners.com/kegcleaning.html and one more... http://www.leeners.com/kegginghow2.html

__________________

Bottled: Cherry Wheat
Bottled: Raspberry Wheat
Bottled: Traditional Mead
Bottled: Cheesefood's Caramel Cream Ale


Fermentor (2): Common Cider

Secondary: Holiday Cider
sailman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 03:41 PM   #7
Spyk'd
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Spyk'd's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Waveland, MS
Posts: 1,017
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdwj
Thanks for the reply Spyk'd, I appreciate it. I'm still very green, so I hope you don't mind me asking some follow-up questions.

From what I gather, you're saying that I should go right from the carboy to the keg. Is that right? Is there a need for secondary?


I'm hoping for a little more detail on this too
"You just rack into the keg, pressurize to carbonate, then pressurize to serve. "

Can you explain how I pressurize to carbonate in detail? Do I prime right in the keg? How long? Do I leave it un-pressurized for a while before pressurizing to serve?

Then, once I pressurize to serve, I assume it's good to drink, right?

Lastly, are there options in kegging or is the korny keg about the best option for beginners?

No, no, no. I said to rack into the keg on bottling day (i.e. after at least 10 days in primary and two weeks in secondary). I've used a secondary since day one and think everyone should, for every batch, every time.


Here's 'Me' on carbonation. As a side note, serving pressure will change from style to style. As a general rule (very general) the darker the beer the less psi (higher temp too). Technically you can drink your beer after about 12 hours of forced carbonation, but you will be rewarded by waiting a full week (see link).


There are 5 gallon cornie kegs and there are 3 gallon. Unless you are pressed for space, I'd go with the 5 gallon; they're cheaper (yes, that's right!) and will accomodate a full 5 gallon batch, which is the norm.


Hope all this helps! Now get out there and brew!
__________________
Primary:
Bleach
Secondary:
American Red
Keg Conditioning:
Gruit
On Tap:
ESB
Bottled:
Nada...
On Deck:
Porter, Belgian Abbey Ale
Spyk'd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 07:32 PM   #8
Sephro
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Hudson MA
Posts: 169
Default

Here are some tips for where to buy equipment.

I bought my 15# CO2 tank and my regulator from beveragefactory.com for $123.00 plus shipping
I bought my kegs at homebrewing.org they where $14/ea when I got them. I think they are a few more $ now but not much. They come uncleaned but are in really nice shape. I bought the O-ring kit from them for like $3/ea keg.

Then just hose from local hardware store and some quick connects from mcmaster.com

If you ever decide you want to bottle you can buy a filler and have the best of both worlds.

One thing with kegging is you better have an extra fridge because you can't fit it in a fridge and use it at the same time...

__________________

Kegged - Munich ale
Secondary - Rye IPA
Aging – Mead

Sephro is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-24-2006, 11:03 PM   #9
rdwj
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rdwj's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Plainfield, IL
Posts: 4,594
Liked 19 Times on 14 Posts

Default

Excellent! Thanks guys.

Looks like I'm ready to do some shopping and get rolling. I'll let you know how it goes!

__________________
rdwj is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2006, 01:09 AM   #10
nosnhojr
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
nosnhojr's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Cary, NC
Posts: 164
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdwj
Let me start by saying that I'm just in the research phase of brewing. I haven't purchased a single piece of equipment yet, but don't mind spending a little more to get it right from the start.

I'm thinking that I'd rather keg beer than bottle it. I've read all the beginner guides and done some other searches for kegging information and haven't really found the answers I'm looking for, so I figured I'd ask.

I'm using the John Palmer guide for starters. What do I have to do differently to keg beer?

Also, if there are any basic steps or tips I can add to this guide right off the bad, I'd greatly appreciate the advice.
Sounds like you're off to a good start! I'm pretty new to homebrewing as well, and I started the same way: lots of reading, then straight to kegging. I found Papazian's "Joy of Homebrewing" and "Homebrewing for Dummies" very useful. The Dummies book is better than you might expect, and the chapter on kegging goes through all the steps in gory detail.

While kegging is much simpler than bottling, one question you have to ask yourself is where you'll keep the kegs. I have a dedicated refridgerator in the basement that'll hold several 5 gal kegs. It's great when I'm working down in the basement, but other times (such as when watching TV upstairs), it would be better to have bottles in the kitchen fridge.

Today I ended up bottling the remainder of my last batch from the keg. Using 22oz bottles, it wasn't bad at all. In fact, I got a lot of pleasure out of seeing my creation bottled!

Kegging is great, but you may find that bottling is also something you want to try. I'm pretty sure I'll do both. My next beer is a hefeweizen, and I'm thinking of going straight to bottles (ie, using sugar to carbonate in the bottle, rather than force-carbonating in the keg).
__________________

on tap: raspberry melomel
primary: first all-grain!
nosnhojr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hop Tea procedures DesertBrew General Techniques 1 11-03-2007 03:46 PM
Keg Dry Hop - Procedures? DesertBrew General Techniques 17 06-22-2007 01:06 AM
cream ale procedures brackbrew General Techniques 8 09-15-2006 12:42 PM
El-Cheapo Mash Out Procedures DesertBrew All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 12 12-18-2005 11:08 PM
steeping procedures drvodka Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 09-06-2005 09:26 PM