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Old 08-22-2013, 08:36 PM   #1
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Default Priming Sugar

I have seen priming sugar calculators that use the current beer temperature to tell how much sugar to add and I have seen calculators that use the fermentation temperature. Which is right?

If I have cold crashed the beer and the temperature is still low does this matter?

Do I have to wait till the temperature is the same as room temperature?

Thanks

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Old 08-22-2013, 08:41 PM   #2
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I think what you consider is the highest temperature the beer reached after fermentation.

When you warm up a solution with a gas dissolved in it, the gas will start coming out, so calculators try to account for that. I don't think it matters a large amount though.

I warm mine up a bit so that sugar dissolves more evenly, but not to room temperature. When I bottle, I try to have my beer cool, so that when it goes in the bottle, it will warm up, release some CO2 and push some O2 out. After that happens, I lock down the caps

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Old 08-22-2013, 08:41 PM   #3
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It would be the temperature at bottling. Take the temp before you are about to bottle. Brewersfriend.com has a ton of calculators.

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Old 08-22-2013, 08:53 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m_stodd View Post
I think what you consider is the highest temperature the beer reached after fermentation.

When you warm up a solution with a gas dissolved in it, the gas will start coming out, so calculators try to account for that. I don't think it matters a large amount though.

I warm mine up a bit so that sugar dissolves more evenly, but not to room temperature. When I bottle, I try to have my beer cool, so that when it goes in the bottle, it will warm up, release some CO2 and push some O2 out. After that happens, I lock down the caps
This is correct. If your beer finished fermentation at, say, 72 degrees, and then you cold crashed it at 34 degrees for a few days, you'd use 72 degrees as the temperature.

The reason is that the calculator tries to "guestimate" the amount of residual co2 in the beer. Since co2 is released more readily at warmer temperatures, and fermentation would be finished before going into cold cold and no more co2 would be created or be dissolved in the beer, you would still use the temperature of 72 degrees.

I dislike those calculators for several reasons, but this is one of them!
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:07 PM   #5
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I dislike those calculators for several reasons, but this is one of them!
Did you forget the link to the calculator, or are you telling me to use my favorite, but follow your response?
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Old 08-22-2013, 09:22 PM   #6
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I'm just trying to figure out if I have this right. I just had to pour out 24 bottles of an over carbonated centennial blonde and it hurt so bad to do it. Two bottles blew up in the case they were in and when I opened the others after the foam filled the sink, I had about an inch in the bottom of each bottle.

So, the instructions from the LHBS on the dextrose package tells me to add 3/4 of a cup for 5 gallons. Since I brew 2.5 gallons I should use half this amount, or .375 cups. I have been adding .333 cups since it is an easy. 1/3 cup of dextrose weighs about 2.375 ounces. and when I use the calculator it tells me i should use 2.14 oz for an american ale at 2.4 volumes. and the amount they want me to use would be good if I wanted 2.7 volumes.

Does all of this make sense?

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Old 08-22-2013, 09:28 PM   #7
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Why the hell didn't you just bleed off some pressure???

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Old 08-22-2013, 09:31 PM   #8
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Why the hell didn't you just bleed off some pressure???
Thats what I was trying to do, There was so much pressure that it just foamed out of the neck of the bottle and left only one inch of beer left. I made the rest in to a short rib recipe. I didn't have a way to save any of it.
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Old 08-23-2013, 12:32 AM   #9
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Listen, I had Xact same problem, but, like a dummy, I had foam caused by particles of hops in a Heavy Ale.
Got desperate, so slllllooooowwwly, read: slowly!!! gently lift the edge of cap just a leeeeetle bit, it will hiss, and foam comes up the neck. Stop lifting and cap may actually return to seal it up again. If not, you can gently recap with the same cap. Repeat. Damned if I was gonna waste ale!!!
It's a PITA, but the ale is really good(11 mo. old) and hopped to high Heaven.

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Old 08-23-2013, 12:48 AM   #10
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Did you forget the link to the calculator, or are you telling me to use my favorite, but follow your response?
I don't use ANY calculator. They are flawed in many ways. The first is the "temperature" part. The second is having you carb "to style" For example, a British mild might be 1.5 volumes of c02 (totally flat) while a weizen might be 4.5 (bottle bombs). Most people who drink bottled beer are accustomed to a "normal" bottled beer pressure of 2.4-2.7 volumes of co2. A British beer on cask is great when flat and served with a beer engine- but if you're bottling, you want the beer carbed.

For me, I always use a scale. And I always use .75-1 ounce of corn sugar per finished gallon of beer. I use .75 ounces for beers that I like with a little less carb, and 1 ounce for others. It works perfectly! No flat beer, no guessing about temperature, and no bottle bombs.

The thing is, "cups" doesn't work. You need a little kitchen scale. I use the scale for my hops as well, so it wasn't an extra investment.
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