Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Priming with Palmer's graph
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-28-2009, 01:58 AM   #1
BillTheSlink
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 431
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default Priming with Palmer's graph

OK,

I will be bottling in a few days and want to know about adjusting carbonation. I brewed a hefe as my first and according to the style guide it's supposed to be pretty carby (and I like them that way). My question is how to use Palmer's chart, posted here:




Let's say I bottle at 70 degrees and I drawl my line to to 3.25 CO2, do I continue the angle to 6oz of corn sugar, or drawl a straight line from 3.25 to 5oz?

__________________

Drinking: Ed Worts Apfelwein, Store bought Bass, Salvator. Can't brew in Winter and I needed bottles.


Primary: Bass Clone Austin Home Brew Supply
Went down in a blaze of glory due to mold infection.

ON DECK: Moosebutt Faux Lager


Reason: changed mistake in type of sugar
BillTheSlink is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2009, 01:59 AM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 62,790
Liked 4915 Times on 3564 Posts
Likes Given: 990

Default

You continue on that angle to get to the ounces of sugar.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Find me on facebook: Lorena Evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2009, 02:02 AM   #3
snailsongs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 690
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

how does the temperature even affect the amount of sugar you need? It seems like the yeast will consume the sugar as well at 50F as it will at 70F, even if it takes a bit longer. can someone explain briefly?

__________________
snailsongs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2009, 02:03 AM   #4
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 62,790
Liked 4915 Times on 3564 Posts
Likes Given: 990

Default

By the way, I wouldn't prime to more than about 2.9 volumes, max. It'll be super carbed at 2.9, champagne like (not to mention risking bottle bombs) if higher than 3.0, in my opinion.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Find me on facebook: Lorena Evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2009, 02:05 AM   #5
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 62,790
Liked 4915 Times on 3564 Posts
Likes Given: 990

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by snailsongs View Post
how does the temperature even affect the amount of sugar you need? It seems like the yeast will consume the sugar as well at 50F as it will at 70F, even if it takes a bit longer. can someone explain briefly?
Well, if the beer has fermented at 50 degrees, and been kept at 50 degrees, it's already got quite a bit of dissolved co2 in it. I especially notice it when I pull lagers out of the cold (34 degree) area, or even with wines under airlock. They'll be quite gassy at a colder temperature, since co2 is more readily dissolved in suspension in a cold substance. Warm the beer up, and it'll bubble like mad- as the co2 comes out of suspension in the warmer temperature.

So, if the beer is at a colder temperature, it's assumed to already have some dissolved co2 in it.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Find me on facebook: Lorena Evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2009, 02:09 AM   #6
snailsongs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Eugene, OR
Posts: 690
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
Well, if the beer has fermented at 50 degrees, and been kept at 50 degrees, it's already got quite a bit of dissolved co2 in it. I especially notice it when I pull lagers out of the cold (34 degree) area, or even with wines under airlock. They'll be quite gassy at a colder temperature, since co2 is more readily dissolved in suspension in a cold substance. Warm the beer up, and it'll bubble like mad- as the co2 comes out of suspension in the warmer temperature.

So, if the beer is at a colder temperature, it's assumed to already have some dissolved co2 in it.
thanks, yooper! that makes perfect sense.
__________________
snailsongs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2009, 02:42 AM   #7
BillTheSlink
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 431
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
Well, if the beer has fermented at 50 degrees, and been kept at 50 degrees, it's already got quite a bit of dissolved co2 in it. I especially notice it when I pull lagers out of the cold (34 degree) area, or even with wines under airlock. They'll be quite gassy at a colder temperature, since co2 is more readily dissolved in suspension in a cold substance. Warm the beer up, and it'll bubble like mad- as the co2 comes out of suspension in the warmer temperature.

So, if the beer is at a colder temperature, it's assumed to already have some dissolved co2 in it.
I am sorry I misunderstand something.

Is the temp what your going to store it at, what it was fermented at (went up and down like a yo-yo), or the temp at bottling (which is what I was thinking).
__________________

Drinking: Ed Worts Apfelwein, Store bought Bass, Salvator. Can't brew in Winter and I needed bottles.


Primary: Bass Clone Austin Home Brew Supply
Went down in a blaze of glory due to mold infection.

ON DECK: Moosebutt Faux Lager

BillTheSlink is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2009, 02:58 AM   #8
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 62,790
Liked 4915 Times on 3564 Posts
Likes Given: 990

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillTheSlink View Post
I am sorry I misunderstand something.

Is the temp what your going to store it at, what it was fermented at (went up and down like a yo-yo), or the temp at bottling (which is what I was thinking).
It's the temp at bottling. sorry to be so confusing. I think it's worth mentioning that if you fermented at 70 degrees the entire time, and only "cold crashed" it to bottle, I think that the co2 level would be quite a bit different than a beer that never went above 50 degrees. That's why I mentioned lagers. Those beers seem practically carbonated when you check them in secondary! Warming the beer seems to "knock" the co2 out of suspension, so if it's at 70 degrees or so, just use the nomograph as indicated.

Sometimes I just plain talk too much! Shutting up now.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

Find me on facebook: Lorena Evans
But I'm pretty boring so don't expect much!
https://www.facebook.com/lorena.t.evans
Yooper is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2009, 03:01 AM   #9
scinerd3000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milton, De
Posts: 2,155
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by YooperBrew View Post
Sometimes I just plain talk too much! Shutting up now.
some of us like your input.....carry on
__________________
On Hiatus: Brewing at work....
scinerd3000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-28-2009, 12:56 PM   #10
MajorTom
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 179
Default

FWIW... When I have bottled, I have used the highest temp the beer has been at. For example, fermented at 65, then let warm to 70 (room temp) then crash cooled to 35. I used 70 degrees for priming calculating. My reasoning is this. After fermentation is complete, as the beer warms up some co2 is going to escape, but when it is cooled long after fermentation there is no more co2 being put into the solution. Is this reasonable? So far it seems to have worked fine.

__________________
MajorTom is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
When to add hops - graph and question. homebrewjapan Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 04-14-2009 03:24 AM
I'm looking for a table or graph Mustangfreak General Beer Discussion 3 03-18-2009 01:19 AM
This week's thought provoking graph. olllllo General Chit Chat 18 08-06-2008 01:15 AM
This week's thought provoking graph. olllllo General Chit Chat 13 12-08-2007 12:19 AM
Useful hop utilization graph Orpheus General Techniques 2 08-19-2007 09:48 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS