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Old 07-13-2013, 11:05 PM   #1
mChavez
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Default Priming calculator questions

Hi!

Can somebody please clarify a few things about the priming calculator here:
http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html

1) Fermentation Temp: is this temp at bottling or average temp of fermentation?

2) Volume of beer: Is this in US or UK gallons?

Thank you!

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Old 07-13-2013, 11:21 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mChavez
Hi!

Can somebody please clarify a few things about the priming calculator here:
http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html

1) Fermentation Temp: is this temp at bottling or average temp of fermentation?

2) Volume of beer: Is this in US or UK gallons?

Thank you!
Us gallons and I use the temp the beer has sat at prior to bottling
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Old 07-13-2013, 11:26 PM   #3
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Temp is temp at end of fermentation.

ie. ferment at 64 then raise to 68 to finish. Cold crash to 37 then bottle. Use 68 as your temp for the calculator

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Old 07-13-2013, 11:43 PM   #4
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Yeah,I'm finding that temp at FG or bottling time works better for that one. And yes,it's USG,though temp can be changed from Fahrenheit to Celcius.

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Old 07-14-2013, 02:50 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mChavez View Post
Hi!

Can somebody please clarify a few things about the priming calculator here:
http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html

1) Fermentation Temp: is this temp at bottling or average temp of fermentation?

2) Volume of beer: Is this in US or UK gallons?

Thank you!
1) As per Docscott
2) US gallons

Don't pay any attention to the Average C02 volumes listed by BJCP style.
Enter the Volumes of C02 manually.
For a bottled beer, this should be roughly 2.5 volumes of C02

-a.
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Old 07-14-2013, 03:17 AM   #6
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For the temp, enter the HIGHEST temp that the beer has been during fermentation. I bottle coming right out of cold crash. If I entered that number, my carbonation would be way the heck off.

2.3-2.6 is a good level for many batches. For some English and Belgian stuff, you can easily reduce that if you want to be more style-specific.

Weigh your priming sugar. It's more accurate than by volume.

Don't try to get creative and prime with honey or molasses. It's harder to measure accurately and the very small amount used for priming brings little or no flavor benefit.
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Old 07-14-2013, 05:41 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigFloyd View Post
For the temp, enter the HIGHEST temp that the beer has been during fermentation. I bottle coming right out of cold crash. If I entered that number, my carbonation would be way the heck off.

2.3-2.6 is a good level for many batches. For some English and Belgian stuff, you can easily reduce that if you want to be more style-specific.

Weigh your priming sugar. It's more accurate than by volume.

Don't try to get creative and prime with honey or molasses. It's harder to measure accurately and the very small amount used for priming brings little or no flavor benefit.
Belgians are actually carbonated around the 3.0 range and above, so I thought.
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Old 07-14-2013, 07:14 AM   #8
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Thanks guys!

I won't risk carbing over 3 volumes in a bottle but I like my beer well cabonated, so 2.5-2.8 would probably be my usual CO2 amount.

How do volumes of CO2 relate to BAR? I want to pressure-test a mini-kegging system but don't know how much air to pump into the test keg.

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Bottled: California Connoisseur Roja Tinto, Coopers IPA kit with additional hops; Munton's Stout; Extract Oktoberfast; Extract Hefeweizen; Extract Rauchbier;
Fermenting: Christmas Trappist; Elderflower wine;
ToDo: Dooval, BCB Porter; Extract Startup Scottish Ale; ZZ-Hop light honey beer; Extract blonde ale; Extract IPA; Mead; More Apfelwein; Extract Mild;

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Old 07-14-2013, 01:06 PM   #9
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Belgians are actually carbonated around the 3.0 range and above, so I thought.
Most of the carb charts put Belgian ales in the 1.9-2.4 range. The BYO one says 2.0-4.5 (hmmmmm, not sure how helpful that is).

If it's something that you're going to just enjoy at home and share with friends, I think that shooting for 2.5 will work nicely for most folks.
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Old 07-14-2013, 01:26 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajf View Post
1) As per Docscott
2) US gallons

Don't pay any attention to the Average C02 volumes listed by BJCP style.
Enter the Volumes of C02 manually.
For a bottled beer, this should be roughly 2.5 volumes of C02

-a.
Not all beers have 2.5 volumes of co2. some have less,some have more per style. A malt forward beer will taste more of the hops then the malt with that much carbonation.
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