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Old 07-06-2014, 08:27 PM   #1
marcus11x
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Default Post fermentation temps

After a beer is finished fermenting, how critical is it that the beer remain below 75 degrees until it bottles? Will off flavors still be produced?

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Old 07-06-2014, 09:35 PM   #2
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Off-flavors can be produced at any time, even after bottling if subjected to temps above room temperature (hence why aging bottled beer is done at temps well below room temp).

Maybe someone else can comment on how critical it is, I would assume a lot has to do with the style if you're talking ester/fusel production. These might not matter in small doses in something like an IPA where it can be masked by the hops, or in a style that already features them like a hefe.

But ask anyone who left their beer in a hot car if it can produce them. I've had a Saison dupont that ended up tasting like a hefe, and a Dirt Wolf DIPA that tasted like a belgian IPA. Again not too bad for these styles, but it wasn't the same beer.

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Old 07-07-2014, 02:34 AM   #3
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Thanks!! I am brand new to this. Loving it!!

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Old 07-07-2014, 03:00 AM   #4
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Extreme temps cause problems, and any extended ageing/storing should be done at cooler temps (cellar or fridge temps).

From what I understand, it's not so much off flavours from ester and fusels, as the yeast is pretty much done, but oxidization starts to happen on extended ageing (even if you did things perfectly), and lower temps slow down those types of problems.

Big temperature swings (say from an afternoon in the car, to a fridge, to back in a car to a friends placement then back in the fridge) can cause issues too, but again, it's different from fermentation issues.


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Old 07-07-2014, 03:57 AM   #5
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Thanks, guys! I am brewing with a neighbor, and his attitude is "aw, it'll be alright". And I am like "No it won't!!"

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Old 07-07-2014, 04:09 AM   #6
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I've been wondering the same thing actually. I've read that you should bottle condition at room temperature (and in some texts I've read "at the same temperature as the fermentation temperature") for at least 1 week before refrigerating, but I really wonder how much leeway there is. In both temperature and time. Obviously a temperature of 90 is horrible, but how acceptable is 78 for an ale? (obviously not acceptable for a lager or something similar)

I'm used to very mild weather where I live, but the day after I boiled my wort and put it in a carboy to begin fermentation, the weather forecast drastically changed from a forecast of 79 degrees to a forecast of 97 degrees. I tried to avoid the wort from getting anywhere near that hot by air conditioning the room I'm keeping the carboy in, but so far the temperature indicated by the fermometer has been consistently between 72 and 79 degrees (currently at 75). Since I just started homebrewing, I don't really care if the beer tastes different than expected, as long as it tastes good.

Like Marcus, my friend just keeps telling me "It'll be okay. It's really hard to screw up an ale," but I'm having difficulty believing him on that.

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Old 07-07-2014, 04:22 AM   #7
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Well the stated reaponse for bottle conditioning is usually 3 weeks @ 70!!!

As far as secondary temps I wouldn't worry if it's a bit higher than fermentation temps, but would stay below 70-74 if possible.

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Old 07-07-2014, 11:20 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by worlddivides View Post
I've been wondering the same thing actually. I've read that you should bottle condition at room temperature (and in some texts I've read "at the same temperature as the fermentation temperature") for at least 1 week before refrigerating, but I really wonder how much leeway there is. In both temperature and time. Obviously a temperature of 90 is horrible, but how acceptable is 78 for an ale? (obviously not acceptable for a lager or something similar)

I'm used to very mild weather where I live, but the day after I boiled my wort and put it in a carboy to begin fermentation, the weather forecast drastically changed from a forecast of 79 degrees to a forecast of 97 degrees. I tried to avoid the wort from getting anywhere near that hot by air conditioning the room I'm keeping the carboy in, but so far the temperature indicated by the fermometer has been consistently between 72 and 79 degrees (currently at 75). Since I just started homebrewing, I don't really care if the beer tastes different than expected, as long as it tastes good.

Like Marcus, my friend just keeps telling me "It'll be okay. It's really hard to screw up an ale," but I'm having difficulty believing him on that.
Most ale yeasts seem to work best in the mid 60's. Fermenting in the mid 70's can unleash all sorts of flavors that you probably don't want in your ale. I would try a swamp cooler get the temperature lower. Put the bucket/carboy in a larger pail with cold water. Add frozen water bottles as needed. Drape a towel over the fermenter and let the end sit in the water so the water wicks up it. Then use a fan blowing on the towel to force evaporation. This will effectively cool the temperatures down.

I have the luxury of a fermenting chamber, and I generally set my temps for anywhere from 62-68 (depending on yeast strain) when I do my ales.
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Old 07-07-2014, 12:46 PM   #9
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As for bottle conditioning, my room is 77... Works fine, and if anything, lets them carb up a bit faster.

The problem with fermenting really hot (which is variable depending on the yeast strain, but usually anything over 70-72 is getting too hot), is that, rather than just masking it taste different, your yeast can start making fusel alcohols. Best case it won't taste so good, worst it gives you a splitting headache after a beer or two.

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Old 07-11-2014, 08:33 PM   #10
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I will see in 3 days. Been between 75 and 77 the whole time

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