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Old 01-30-2011, 06:46 PM   #1
Danam404
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Default Pitching on a cake?

Hey guys, pretty new to brewing, but reading a lot. I hear people say, I brewed another xxxx and pitched it directly on the cake... What does this mean and how do people do it??

Thanks

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Old 01-30-2011, 06:52 PM   #2
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I'll be doing it again this afternoon. The simplest method is to rack your beer out of the primary bucket leaving behind the yeast "cake". Now pour your freshly brewed wort on top of this cake. Voila.

Another method I practice is to take said cake and leave a little beer on top. Slosh it around until it becomes a slurry, and I pour that into a sanitized pickle jar and store it in the fridge for a few days that way. I haven't got into yeast washing just yet, but I haven't had a problem with saving a cake like that either. (Good straining practices keep out the hops and particulate matter, leaving my cakes pretty clean.)

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Old 01-30-2011, 06:54 PM   #3
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It's pretty simple. After you've brewed one beer, you rack it into your bottling bucket (or secondary carboy) and you leave a "cake" of yeast and trub behind.

If you brew another beer, and cool it just before you rack your first, you can put your new beer directly onto this old yeast cake. No need to buy another packet of yeast, you just use what you already have again.

This is especially useful if your second beer is a big beer (like a barleywine). Instead of making a huge starter, you just make a batch of beer before you do your barleywine.

You should also do a search for "washing" your yeast. This allows you to get even more uses out of a pack of yeast. It will also allow you to bottle harvest yeast from commercial beers.

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Old 01-30-2011, 07:01 PM   #4
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After you brew a beer and either bottle or keg it, you're left with a cake of yeast at the bottom of your bucket/carboy. Some people brew up a new batch of beer and put it right back in the same bucket/carboy. That way, you don't have to pitch new yeast. Some do this with great results. Some say that unless the new wort that you pitching is of a barley wine caliber, you should not pitch onto a cake because then you'd be over pitching the yeast.

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Old 01-30-2011, 07:08 PM   #5
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Thanks guys! Does it have to be the same type of beer? Im doing a blonde right now, I did strain the trub but there's all kinds of cold break in there. My next will be an American ale that's supposed to be very clear and light. They use the same type of yeast.. Will pitching on that cake cloud my next beer or change the flavor?


Also, can you save the Cake in the fridge or freezer? How long is it viable?

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Old 01-30-2011, 09:00 PM   #6
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Anyone?

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Old 01-30-2011, 09:04 PM   #7
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It doesn't have to be the same type of beer. The 'yeast cake' police will soon log on to tell you that you are ruining your beer by over pitching yeast. I do all the time....no ill effects. Just make sure the next beer is higher ABV and IBU and you'll be fine.

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Old 01-30-2011, 09:04 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danam404 View Post
Thanks guys! Does it have to be the same type of beer? Im doing a blonde right now, I did strain the trub but there's all kinds of cold break in there. My next will be an American ale that's supposed to be very clear and light. They use the same type of yeast.. Will pitching on that cake cloud my next beer or change the flavor?


Also, can you save the Cake in the fridge or freezer? How long is it viable?
I don't know about saving the whole yeast cake, but I do know that if you wash the yeast and store it in the fridge you have a couple of weeks to use it before you start to need to do a starter.

Freezing is a much more tedious process. Look into "yeast banks" for info on that as you cannot put yeast directly into the freezer as the cells will split and those wonderful little yeasties will die!
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Old 01-30-2011, 09:31 PM   #9
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I have pitched directly on a yeast cake several times on consecutive batches with no problems. I have also poured the entire cake in a large mason jar and kept it in the fridge for almost a week before washing the yeast out. My harvested yeast have been reused as long as 5 months later in the fridge with no problems at all.

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Old 01-30-2011, 09:45 PM   #10
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My favorite is angel food. You'll need a little extra bittering hops to balance the added sweetness.

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