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Old 01-06-2013, 02:54 AM   #1
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Default Pitched a ton of yeast - no signs after 12 hrs?

I brewed an Irish Red Ale this morning. The yeast I used has been washed and used twice before - this was the third batch I'd used it on. It's the Wyeast Irish Ale 1084. The last batch I used it on, I washed and recovered the entire yeast cake (approximately 2 full cups of slurry). That was on Dec. 19. I stored the washed yeast in my fridge. Today, I gave it 4 hours to warm to room temperature, then pitched the entire 2 cups of yeast slurry, expecting a ferocious fermentation. However, that was 12 hours ago, and so far, I don't have any signes of fermentation (some bubbles in the carboy, probably residual from aeration - no bubbling in the pail the blowoff tube leads to). O.G. was 1.041.

Can it take longer than 12 hours for big batch (2 cups) of 3-rd generation yeast slurry to kick off fermentation? If I don't see anything by tomorrow night (36 hours), I'll rehydrate and pitch some US-05, but I'd really love for this Irish Ale yeast to take off. Is there still hope?

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Old 01-06-2013, 03:06 AM   #2
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There is hope for up to 72 hours. Hold off on "fixing" things. Probably would have been better to do a starter to wake the yeast up. Likely that is what is taking a while. The yeast are just now waking up and starting to work. Tomorrow morning it will probably be bubbling away. What temp are you at?

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Old 01-06-2013, 03:10 AM   #3
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I've got the carboy covered in a wet t-shirt, sitting in a rope tub full of water, with 2 bottles of ice in it, being changed every 12 hours. Ambient room temp is around 70 F.

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Old 01-06-2013, 04:42 AM   #4
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Is your carboy sitting in ice water or am I reading that wrong?

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Old 01-06-2013, 07:09 AM   #5
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Next time don't allow temperature of wort to warm up, pitch few degrees lower and let it rise to fermentation temperature. This way you will get controlled yeast growth without producing off flavors like diacetyl, esters..

As for fermentation, 12 hrs is still to early for serious conclusion, it can take up to 72 hours before signs of fermentation. Try to keep temperature under 70F and don't do anything before taking gravity reading.

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Old 01-06-2013, 07:10 PM   #6
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agreed with dis and the others.

A slurry that is a few weeks old will have depleted glycogen reserves so the cell permeability will be low making for a slow start to fermentation. You probably pitched 200-500 billion cells, so I be it will be going like a rocket ship once it does get going. It might even finish the bulk of the fermentation in 12 hours once it is moving.

Here is a graph of typical fermentation:
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...ervations.html

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Old 01-06-2013, 07:21 PM   #7
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Hey all,

How do I save my yeast cake from my brown ale, wash and store it? What is the process by which this is done?

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Old 01-06-2013, 07:36 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewMasta View Post
Hey all,

How do I save my yeast cake from my brown ale, wash and store it? What is the process by which this is done?
Just pour it into sanitized quart sized mason jars and put it in the fridge. Each one will have 400 billion to 2 trillion cells.

Washing just pours 95% of the viable cells down the drain. See here for details:
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...g-exposed.html

And more recently:
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...revisited.html
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Old 01-06-2013, 07:45 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the_trout View Post
Is your carboy sitting in ice water or am I reading that wrong?
If this is true, you may be at a pretty low temp. A slow start may be due to this.

Can you read the temp somehow? In a 70F room, maybe take the ice out of the bath??

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Old 01-06-2013, 11:59 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CryoEng View Post
If this is true, you may be at a pretty low temp. A slow start may be due to this.

Can you read the temp somehow? In a 70F room, maybe take the ice out of the bath??
Yes, I did indeed have the carboy in basically a bath of ice water. In the past, I've pitched rehydrated dry yeast or a yeast starter under these circumstances successfully, but now that I think about it, those fermentations probably started up in time before the cold water cooled the wort too much, so the fermentation generated enough heat to keep its temperature in the optimal range. But repitching this washed yeast probably lead to a slow start, which allowed the ice water to cool the wort too low to really let fermentation get going and generate the additional 5-10 degrees of internal temperature increase.

I've taken the ice out of the water (after about 12 hours), so it should be slowly warming up to room temperature. I'll give it another day or so to see if it really gets going.
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