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Old 04-16-2011, 04:46 AM   #1
Fletcher21
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Default Pancake layer in bottles

Hey is there any way to avoid getting the pancake layer when conditioning in bottles?

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Old 04-16-2011, 05:49 AM   #2
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Not that I know of. But, there is a way of not worrying about it.

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Old 04-16-2011, 05:53 AM   #3
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You can filter it out, but you'll also filter out the yeast needed for bottle conditioning.

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Old 04-16-2011, 08:44 AM   #4
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Really depends on how thick the layer is. A thin little line of yeast at the bottom is normal, however a really thick layer may represent that you are stirring up your cake from the bottom of your fermentor. As they say a picture is worth a thousand words. Hard to say if you really have a problem without actually seeing it.

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Old 04-16-2011, 12:03 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CABeerMaker View Post
Really depends on how thick the layer is. A thin little line of yeast at the bottom is normal, however a really thick layer may represent that you are stirring up your cake from the bottom of your fermentor. As they say a picture is worth a thousand words. Hard to say if you really have a problem without actually seeing it.
Are there any real problems that can result from this other than not being able to pour as much out of each bottle?
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Old 04-16-2011, 12:51 PM   #6
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Are there any real problems that can result from this other than not being able to pour as much out of each bottle?
The larger the cake and the longer you leave it in bottle, the greater chance you'll pick up yeasty flavours from it. Most people don't worry about it as the beer will be drank long before that would happen though.
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Old 04-16-2011, 12:59 PM   #7
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Its high in B vitamins. Pour the beer in a glass, chug the yeast from the bottle and tell SWMBO you are taking your vitamins.

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Old 04-16-2011, 03:45 PM   #8
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It's not that big of a layer and I usually pour it into a glass anyways but I just thought I would put the question out there. I have done a few batches already and it doesn't bother me but just checking if there was a trick I might be missing.

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Old 04-16-2011, 04:04 PM   #9
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I am new at this, but I have drank a good bit of beer and I work at a wine store (we sell beer and more too!). Beers along the lines of Duvel that have been bottle conditioned look as if they have a caked layer of yeast that has been sitting there a good while. Even though the beer is bottle conditioned, the clarity is absolute. I am guessing they bottle condition for about a year or so before the beer goes to the shelf. I do not think I am that patient for that long of a wait, but I have noticed the further I go from the bottling date, the better the beer has tasted.

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Old 04-16-2011, 04:19 PM   #10
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The larger the cake and the longer you leave it in bottle, the greater chance you'll pick up yeasty flavours from it. Most people don't worry about it as the beer will be drank long before that would happen though.
This is bs....actually the longer you leave it in the bottle, the tighter the yeast cake will compress. And yeasty flavors? That's not true either. I've had beers sit for years and not had yeasty flavors. Are you just repeating something you've "heard?"

The longer you chill the beer in the fridge, the tighter the yeast cake. I had a beer in the back of my fridge for 3 months, that I could completely upend and no yeast came out. Longer in the cold the tighter the yeast cake becomes. Even just chilling for a week (besides getting rid of chill haze) will go to great lengths to allow you to leave the yeast behind, but with only a minimum amount of beer.

Now Fletcher21, If you are bottle conditioning your living beer, you can't avoid it. It's a natural part of the process.

Read this, and learn to love the yeast. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/anyone-using-filter-bottling-123758/#post1379528

Although you can't totally eliminate it, I talk about how you can limit it, here http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/appearance-question-too-much-trub-solids-223539/#post2621825

I get very little sediment in my bottles, but even if I do, who cares? It's a part of living beers, including a heck of a lot of my favorite commercial beers. And despite booboos comment, I've never had a "yeasty" taste in beers that weren't meant to have them, even bottle conditioned commercial beers that have cellared for years. The only way you'd get a yeasty taste would be if you shook the beer before pouring it, and even if you did, if the yeast cake is tight it won't shake up that much anyway.

Read what I linked, maybe you'll hate the "dreaded" yeast pancake a lot less.
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