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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Oxidation
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Old 10-23-2008, 09:40 AM   #1
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Default Oxidation

I'm not sure when I'm justified worrying about oxidation and when I should just relax. From what I understand, you're only in danger of oxidizing your brew if you splash hot wort, or if you splash after fermentation has begun.

And yet, I find myself timidly "rocking the baby" after I've pitched the yeast for fear of oxidizing, and I'm overly cautions not to blow bubbles when I rack to my secondary for the same reason.

When should I truly be worried about oxidizing?

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Old 10-23-2008, 10:25 AM   #2
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Rock the baby all you want, if the airlock is still in you have only co2 mixing things up to roust the yeast. Serves them right for getting lazy and not doing their job.

Racking from your primary on the second floor to your secondary in the basement with an open air flow....
That might be a problem.

Err on the side of caution, if I see bubbles racking, I stop it and crank down the seals, but if primary fermentation is done, it is a small, possible issue. Don't ignore it, but don't freak about it.

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Old 10-23-2008, 10:51 AM   #3
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Just relax....it take a lot of O2 to cause oxydation. Just breath, your beer is heartier than you're giving it credit for...

Just take proper percautions, have a good process, but do't be hyper sensative about it...

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Old 10-23-2008, 01:51 PM   #4
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If the wort is at pitching temperatures you really don't need to worry about oxidation until after the fermentation.

I shake the bejesus out of my carboy to aerate before pitching yeast. The yeast need the O2 to help get going.

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Old 10-23-2008, 02:02 PM   #5
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Until fermentation begins you don't have to worry about oxidation. The yeast need oxygen to begin the fermentation process so a wort with lots of oxygen is beneficial to the little yeasties. The effects of oxidation take so long to be noticable that even if it does happen your beer should all be gone by then anyhow RDWHAHB

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Old 10-23-2008, 02:03 PM   #6
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I also shake vigorously after pitching the yeast.

If I need to rouse yeast in the primary, I give a pretty good shake, too. I do not worry about oxidation, as my primary is full of CO2.


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Old 10-23-2008, 05:49 PM   #7
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Adding to this oxidation subject..........How do you know for sure you have oxidized the beer? and I was also want to comment on the bubbles in the racking tube. I may be wrong but isn't your beer slightly carbonated in the primary and as you rack it off it should release that trapped CO2 in the tube and secondary?

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Old 10-23-2008, 06:06 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Madcat100 View Post
Adding to this oxidation subject..........How do you know for sure you have oxidized the beer?
When you smell or taste oxidation. For a fairly young beer, that usually comes across as a papery or cardboard-like flavor or aroma. More often than note, you get it in the finish. Oxidation also tends to reduce malt character.

In older beers that have been exposed to far less oxygen, you can get nutty, sherry notes that do not compete with the malt and can be quite nice.


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Old 10-23-2008, 06:13 PM   #9
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Quote:
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I also shake vigorously after pitching the yeast.
That'll be the over-excitement then?

Seriously though, how do you vigorously shake a 5 gallon primary without getting 6 of your friends to help?
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Old 10-23-2008, 06:17 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GroovePuppy View Post
Seriously though, how do you vigorously shake a 5 gallon primary without getting 6 of your friends to help?

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