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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > One Gallon Batches
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Old 01-27-2011, 02:00 AM   #1
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Default One Gallon Batches

This might be a very dumb question, but how do you do a one gallon batch. I live in an apartment so space is an issue, I have a full keg plus another brew about to transfer to my secondary. All of my recipes in BeerAlchemy are for five gal batches, can i simply scale the recipe by .2? Is everything else the same? And do i also scale the yeast?

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:07 AM   #2
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Sure, you can do that. I did that for my first 3 batches or so. You can scale the yeast if you use starters or dry yeast, but if you just use liquid yeast straight from the package, that's not enough for a full 5 gallon batch anyways so I would add a greater proportion of that - maybe all of it or 2/3, depending on how clean you want it to be.

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:10 AM   #3
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You can scale it linearly but be aware that you might need to make some tweaks after you brew it the first time to account for the different losses that come with the smaller batch.

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:13 AM   #4
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what size carboy should i use? I was thinking 2 one gal glass jugs, is that what i should do or one 3 gal?

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:15 AM   #5
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You can scale it linearly but be aware that you might need to make some tweaks after you brew it the first time to account for the different losses that come with the smaller batch.
Since i have never done this, what do you mean?
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Old 01-27-2011, 02:25 AM   #6
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Since i have never done this, what do you mean?
There are systemic losses that occur throughout the brewing process. For example, you lose some of the wort due to hot & cold break, from wort that remains in tubing or in the bottom of your brew kettle, from beer that stays in the primary fermenter when racking to another fermenter or kegging/bottling, or from absorption from dry hopping or adding fruit or other stuff.

For some of these, the amounts tend to be roughly the same no matter what size batch you do, although that is not always the case. For that reason, simply scaling your recipe by 1/5 could leave you less than 1 gallon even if you end up with 5 gallons normally.

Also, as a result scaling can also lead you wrong on hops additions, because the preboil gravity might be different than it would be for a larger batch, which changes the amount of alpha acids that get isomerized during the boil, affecting bitterness.
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Old 01-27-2011, 02:27 AM   #7
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I completely understand that logic, thanx

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:36 AM   #8
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I would recommend getting a 2 gallon bucket and thirding everything for 1.7 gal or getting a 3 gallon carboy and you could just halve it. I started with one gallon and with my learning mistakes and all once you learn how to make a beer "good" your going to wish you had a little more.Although one gallons arnt a bad idea to experiment but youll find youll end up getting more than a few vessels.Your going to wait at least 5 weeks before getting a decent beer and you may as well brew up some more in the mean time.

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:37 AM   #9
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I've done eight, single gallon batches and I've scaled down the yeast, even without rehydrating or creating a starter on some of those and it seems to work just fine.

As mentioned, the loss amount is probably about the same between a 5 and 1 gallon, but it looks like you lose a lot more. I wind up with only 8, maybe 9 bottles per gallon batch.

I'd honestly go with the 3 gallon if your stove and space and pot handle it easily enough, because those 8 bottles go pretty quick. I just did singles because I had a single gallon stock pot on hand more than my limited space.

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Old 01-27-2011, 02:45 AM   #10
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I would aim for at least a 20% overage to at least count for trub. It will also help with krausen. So for example I use a 6 gallon fermenter for a 5 gallon batch. This makes it so I do not have a blow off tube and when I transfer it the loss I have do the trub will result in a 5 gallon keg.

If you use a 1.5 or 2 gallon bucket you should be fine.

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