The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Ok to hydrate yeast the night before?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-09-2013, 02:00 AM   #11
andy6026
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 622
Liked 90 Times on 68 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTR08 View Post
I would think 20 mins should be okay. There are plenty of posters who claim not to rehydrate at all with not adverse effects...
Pitching it dry has crossed my mind too, but seeing that this is only my second batch I want to get the full experience still. My fermenting temperature will also be on the cool side (around 60F), so hydrating it will likely help get the gurgling going in good time.

So, thanks for advising not to rehydrate tonight. I'll find a way to do it tomorrow, I'm sure.

Cheers!
__________________
andy6026 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2013, 02:02 AM   #12
Puddlethumper
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Puddlethumper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: San Joaquin Valley, California
Posts: 1,465
Liked 199 Times on 159 Posts
Likes Given: 172

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by andy6026 View Post
it takes at least 30-40 mins to prep the yeast, but I'm not sure if his instructions are out of date? What's the fastest way to effectively hydrate yeast?
Its really not that big of a deal. While your boil is going and you're standing around waiting for time to pitch that last ounce of hops go into the kitchen and put a cup of water in a saucepan and set the burner so it will come to a boil. Every once in a while, between beers, wander back into the kitchen to check on the water. Once it is boiling it is sterile. Cover, turn the heat off and forget it for a while.

Go have another beer. Once you have started your wort chiller (and you are waiting for the temp to drop) go check the temperature of that water on the stove. (Use a sanitized thermometer). Once it drops to 90-100F (if using Safale yeast) pour about 4 oz. into a sanitized measuring cup and sprinkle the yeast into it. Swirl it around and go check on your cooling wort.

By the time your wort is ready for the yeast the yeast will be ready for the wort. Pitch the yeast, put the airlock into the fermenter, move the fermenter to wherever its going to live for a couple weeks and go have another beer! Nothing to it.
__________________

--------

Beer ----

--- the reason I wake up every afternoon.

------

Puddlethumper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2013, 02:08 AM   #13
andy6026
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 622
Liked 90 Times on 68 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Puddlethumper View Post
Its really not that big of a deal. While your boil is going and you're standing around waiting for time to pitch that last ounce of hops go into the kitchen and put a cup of water in a saucepan and set the burner so it will come to a boil. Every once in a while, between beers, wander back into the kitchen to check on the water. Once it is boiling it is sterile. Cover, turn the heat off and forget it for a while.

Go have another beer. Once you have started your wort chiller (and you are waiting for the temp to drop) go check the temperature of that water on the stove. (Use a sanitized thermometer). Once it drops to 90-100F (if using Safale yeast) pour about 4 oz. into a sanitized measuring cup and sprinkle the yeast into it. Swirl it around and go check on your cooling wort.

By the time your wort is ready for the yeast the yeast will be ready for the wort. Pitch the yeast, put the airlock into the fermenter, move the fermenter to wherever its going to live for a couple weeks and go have another beer! Nothing to it.
That's the 'can-do' attitude I needed to move tomorrow's brew day along. The weatherman's promising glory, and I can't think of anything better I want to do than be out there sipping and stirring. Cheers!
__________________
andy6026 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2013, 02:13 AM   #14
Puddlethumper
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Puddlethumper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: San Joaquin Valley, California
Posts: 1,465
Liked 199 Times on 159 Posts
Likes Given: 172

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by andy6026 View Post
Pitching it dry has crossed my mind too,

Cheers!
Oh, and btw, pitching it dry isn't all that bad of an idea. Have done that with Munton & Fissons with excellent results. There's a whole bunch of folks who've had good results with pitching Safale the same way. Don't know ahout Nottingham, Windsor, etc.
__________________

--------

Beer ----

--- the reason I wake up every afternoon.

------

Puddlethumper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2013, 02:17 AM   #15
Puddlethumper
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Puddlethumper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: San Joaquin Valley, California
Posts: 1,465
Liked 199 Times on 159 Posts
Likes Given: 172

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by andy6026 View Post
That's the 'can-do' attitude I needed to move tomorrow's brew day along. The weatherman's promising glory, and I can't think of anything better I want to do than be out there sipping and stirring. Cheers!
I hope you have a great day! Cheers!
__________________

--------

Beer ----

--- the reason I wake up every afternoon.

------

Puddlethumper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2013, 02:18 AM   #16
andy6026
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 622
Liked 90 Times on 68 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

you too, thanks for the advice!

__________________
andy6026 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2013, 03:24 AM   #17
BigFloyd
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BigFloyd's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tyler, Texas
Posts: 4,802
Liked 626 Times on 548 Posts
Likes Given: 575

Default

It's worth the effort to rehydrate dry yeast. The studies on this topic show that a much higher percentage of cells survive intro to the wort vs. sprinkling it dry. Is it absolutely needed? No. Is it a much better brewing practice? Heck yeah.

If you take the extra time to get your wort down to a better pitch temp (65*F), you'll have the time it takes to finish rehydrating yeast.

Before you even start your boil, put a full cup of filtered (not distilled) water in a Pyrex cup and zap it in the microwave for 7 minutes. That should boil it down to about 1/2 cup. Take that out of the microwave and cover it with a piece of foil that's been sprayed with Star-San. While you're doing the boil, it will be cooling to the desired temp of 100*F +/-5*.

After hooking up the chiller, check the water in the Pyrex with a sanitized thermometer. If it's 95-105*, start your rehydration process. After you've chilled, whirlpooled and let the wort settle 10-15 min, the only thing left is to adjust the temp of the yeast slurry (by adding small portions of wort and letting it sit a few, repeat until it's within 10* of the wort) and pitch away.
__________________
BigFloyd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2013, 03:36 AM   #18
helibrewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
helibrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 3,069
Liked 171 Times on 155 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

You don't want to do the rehydration the night before. The yeast should only be without food for 20-30 minutes, otherwise they begin to starve and begin the process of going back into dormancy.

__________________
Something is always fermenting....
"It's Bahl Hornin'"

Primary:
Brite Tank/Lagering:
Kegged: Hefeweizen, Chocolate Hazelnut Porter, Kumquat Saison, Tart Cherry Cider, Belgian Tripel, Maibock Bock, Ommegang Abbey Ale Clone, Belgian Golden Strong, German Pils (WLP830)
Bottled: Belgian Quad (Grand Reserve), Derangement (Belgian Dark Strong)
On Deck:
My Site: www.restlesscellars.com
helibrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2013, 03:42 AM   #19
fizgig
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
fizgig's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Royal Oak, MI
Posts: 402
Liked 36 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 50

Default

here's an article I read:

Dr. Clayton Cone suggests the following:
Let me give you some facts regarding rehydration and you can decide for yourself where you want to Compromise.
Every strain of yeast has its own optimum rehydration temperature. All of them range between 95 F to 105F. Most of them closer to 105F. The dried yeast cell wall is fragile and it is the first few minutes (possibly seconds) of rehydration that the warm temperature is critical while it is reconstituting its cell wall structure. As you drop the initial temperature of the water from 95 to 85 or 75 or 65F the yeast leached out more and more of its insides damaging the each cell.
The yeast viability also drops proportionally. At 95 – 105 F, there is 100% recovery of the viable dry yeast. At 60F, there can be as much as 60% dead cells. The water should be tap water with the normal amount of hardness present. The hardness is essential for good recovery. 250 -500 ppm hardness is ideal. This means that deionized or distilled water should not be used. Ideally, the warm rehydration water should contain about 0.5 – 1.0% yeast extract.
For the initial few minutes (perhaps seconds) of rehydration, the yeast cell wall cannot differentiate what passes through the wall. Toxic materials like sprays, hops, SO2 and sugars in high levels, that the yeast normally can selectively keep from passing through its cell wall rush right in and seriously damage the cells. The moment that the cell wall is properly reconstituted, the yeast can then regulate what goes in and out of the cell. That is why we hesitate to recommend rehydration in wort or must. Very dilute wort seems to be OK.
How do many beer and wine makers have successful fermentations when they ignore all the above? I believe that it is just a numbers game. Each gram of Active Dry Yeast contains about 20 billion live yeast cells. If you slightly damage the cells, they have a remarkable ability to recover in the rich wort. If you kill 60% of the cell you still have 8 billion cells per gram that can go on to do the job at a slower rate.

__________________
fizgig is offline
BigFloyd Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-09-2013, 01:01 PM   #20
BigFloyd
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BigFloyd's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tyler, Texas
Posts: 4,802
Liked 626 Times on 548 Posts
Likes Given: 575

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fizgig View Post
here's an article I read:

Dr. Clayton Cone suggests the following:
Let me give you some facts regarding rehydration and you can decide for yourself where you want to Compromise.
Every strain of yeast has its own optimum rehydration temperature. All of them range between 95 F to 105F. Most of them closer to 105F. The dried yeast cell wall is fragile and it is the first few minutes (possibly seconds) of rehydration that the warm temperature is critical while it is reconstituting its cell wall structure. As you drop the initial temperature of the water from 95 to 85 or 75 or 65F the yeast leached out more and more of its insides damaging the each cell.
The yeast viability also drops proportionally. At 95 – 105 F, there is 100% recovery of the viable dry yeast. At 60F, there can be as much as 60% dead cells. The water should be tap water with the normal amount of hardness present. The hardness is essential for good recovery. 250 -500 ppm hardness is ideal. This means that deionized or distilled water should not be used. Ideally, the warm rehydration water should contain about 0.5 – 1.0% yeast extract.
For the initial few minutes (perhaps seconds) of rehydration, the yeast cell wall cannot differentiate what passes through the wall. Toxic materials like sprays, hops, SO2 and sugars in high levels, that the yeast normally can selectively keep from passing through its cell wall rush right in and seriously damage the cells. The moment that the cell wall is properly reconstituted, the yeast can then regulate what goes in and out of the cell. That is why we hesitate to recommend rehydration in wort or must. Very dilute wort seems to be OK.
How do many beer and wine makers have successful fermentations when they ignore all the above? I believe that it is just a numbers game. Each gram of Active Dry Yeast contains about 20 billion live yeast cells. If you slightly damage the cells, they have a remarkable ability to recover in the rich wort. If you kill 60% of the cell you still have 8 billion cells per gram that can go on to do the job at a slower rate.
+1. That article is a good explanation of the rationale behind this.

I used to think of it as simply pitching the little beasts into a nice bucket of their favorite food, but apparently wort isn't the friendliest of environments for unreconstituted dry yeast cells due to lower pH and the other factors listed by the good doctor.

I want to give the yeast every bit of help that I can provide, so I rehydrate.
__________________
BigFloyd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Nottingham yeast - hydrate or not ? BOBTHEukBREWER All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 138 10-23-2012 07:03 PM
Re-hydrate the yeast or sprinkle it on? WortCarboy Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 43 09-18-2011 04:22 PM
Should I re-hydrate my yeast? gcdowd Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 30 06-03-2011 12:33 PM
Liquid yeast fermentation failed. Just ordered dry yeast; should I re-hydrate? krantze Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 01-26-2011 04:57 AM
Do you hydrate dry yeast? JeffNYC Recipes/Ingredients 21 10-02-2007 03:22 PM