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Old 08-23-2011, 04:50 AM   #12
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What yeast are you using?
Wyeast 1768 English bitter. I have one of the two NB stores about two miles away and that is what the guy I talked to told me to use.
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Old 08-23-2011, 04:53 AM   #13
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Ok, you can ferment that at temps less than 65, in my experience. If you want English fruity esters, I'd go no higher than 68. If you'd like a cleaner profile, take it down to 62.

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Old 08-23-2011, 04:55 AM   #14
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Unless you are a beer judge you won't be able to taste the off flavors from a few degrees temp increase.

Just remember, in the end you are still getting beer. No offense but based on the question I'm guessing you aren't a pro yet so you won't be able to notice anything.

Heck I've been doing it for 2 years and I couldn't pick out any "off flavors" because I don't brew the same recipe over and over and over.

RDWHAHB

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Old 08-23-2011, 05:03 AM   #15
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Ok, you can ferment that at temps less than 65, in my experience. If you want English fruity esters, I'd go no higher than 68. If you'd like a cleaner profile, take it down to 62.
Thanks Pappers I am sort of a fan of both, so I will try to keep it between there.
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Old 08-23-2011, 05:06 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by dallasdb View Post
Unless you are a beer judge you won't be able to taste the off flavors from a few degrees temp increase.

Just remember, in the end you are still getting beer. No offense but based on the question I'm guessing you aren't a pro yet so you won't be able to notice anything.

Heck I've been doing it for 2 years and I couldn't pick out any "off flavors" because I don't brew the same recipe over and over and over.

RDWHAHB
Definitely not a pro yet, so I will RDWHAB since this is my first.
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Old 08-23-2011, 08:11 AM   #17
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I dunno... I am kind of a freak about fermentation temps, but my first batches were brewed on the kitchen counter of my Miami Beach condo in the summer... I would leave the fermenter bubbling away for about a week and the temps would get into the 80s. I never noticed any off flavors and neither did any of my friends.

I need to qualify this with the fact that it was a looong time ago and we were more interested in the alcoholic effects back then than appreciating nuances, BUT it's important to note that even with those high temps, no one ever thought the brew was anything but delicious. And I used to go high on the booze content by spiking a 5 gallon batch with a couple of cups of corn sugar! If I look for my notes, I might be able to pull up what kit I was using and what flavorings..... I seem to remember using American Light and adding some Hallertau hops....maybe chocolate malt during the boil...

But the bottom line... don't go nuts about fermentation temps if the final product is drinkable!

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Old 08-23-2011, 02:17 PM   #18
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I'm pretty confident that for most ale yeasts (Belgians excepted) that nearly everyone will be able to taste the difference between a beer fermented at 75 and another at 62. The difference may not be important to you, but there is a noticeable difference that will be plainly noticeable to most palates.

That being said, the advice above about not stressing out is good - its your first brew, you're making beer, enjoy it

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Old 08-25-2011, 08:51 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappers_
I'm pretty confident that for most ale yeasts (Belgians excepted) that nearly everyone will be able to taste the difference between a beer fermented at 75 and another at 62. The difference may not be important to you, but there is a noticeable difference that will be plainly noticeable to most palates.

That being said, the advice above about not stressing out is good - its your first brew, you're making beer, enjoy it
My thought is that unless you brew the same recipe multiple times you wouldn't be able to tell. Reason being you don't have a baseline to reference the taste.

I'm all about brewing it, relaxing and drinking it! If you don't like it, give away some bottles or invite friends over to drink it!
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Old 08-25-2011, 11:12 AM   #20
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My thought is that unless you brew the same recipe multiple times you wouldn't be able to tell. Reason being you don't have a baseline to reference the taste.
I think your advice to relax and enjoy brewing is great. But advising new brewers that fermenting temps aren't important is bad advice, IMHO.

You don't need to brew a recipe multiple times to taste the hot alcohols or excessive esters often produced by fermenting ale yeasts at 75 degrees. Those flavors will be apparent to nearly anyone, and they won't be pleasant.
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