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Old 03-20-2013, 03:14 AM   #1
billpaustin
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Default Nottingham is a monster!

My second batch is an Irish Stout partial mash. I pitched at 75 degrees, and by morning it was down to 69, with a TON of bubbles. The next morning the air temp was 60, and beer temp was 66, it was cooking!

To get the best results with Nottingham, I probably should have waited and pitched at 66, right?

It has never gone above 68 after the start, and I had a 2 inch foam nightmare, but a good one , in the carboy. I would hate to think what would happen if it got into the 70's! A monster.

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Old 03-20-2013, 03:20 AM   #2
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nottingham is known as a seriously hungry yeast. i've used it dozens of times, and yep, it's a busy 1. i usually pitch it around 64, and keep it there

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Old 03-20-2013, 03:22 AM   #3
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Probably should have waited, but not much you can do now right?

Nottingham is, in my opinion, a fabulous yeast (although I've never made an irish stout with it personally). It does happen to be fairly temperature dependent though. Best to pitch in the low 60s. I've had a few off flavors when the temp got above 70, but I've at least always pitched low. I've heard that it can be downright nasty if you get up to 70 and over during active fermentation.

It sure does quick work!

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Old 03-20-2013, 04:19 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hillhousesawdustco View Post
Nottingham is, in my opinion, a fabulous yeast (although I've never made an irish stout with it personally). It does happen to be fairly temperature dependent though. Best to pitch in the low 60s. I've had a few off flavors when the temp got above 70, but I've at least always pitched low. I've heard that it can be downright nasty if you get up to 70 and over during active fermentation.

It sure does quick work!

+1.

If you can control your temps to keep them low and consistent, Notty is excellent. It really shines when you can ferment with it at 55*F for a week, slowly bring it up into the low 60's another 10-14 days and then a D-rest at 68* for a couple of days. The result is very lager-like.

I'm drinking a Munich Dunkel right now in which I used Notty that way. It came out crisp and smooth. Next batch will be a mini-mash Maibock that will get the same low-temp, step-up Notty treatment (instead of the usual German lager/bock yeast). I'm very interested to see how that's going to turn out.
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Old 03-20-2013, 04:23 AM   #5
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It really shines when you can ferment with it at 55*F for a week, slowly bring it up into the low 60's another 10-14 days and then a D-rest at 68* for a couple of days. The result is very lager-like.

I'm drinking a Munich Dunkel right now in which I used Notty that way. It came out crisp and smooth.
interesting. never tried it. on my list of soon-to-be's
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Old 03-20-2013, 08:31 AM   #6
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Recommended Temperature Range by Danstar is 57-70 F .

Hector

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Old 03-20-2013, 11:35 AM   #7
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Notty rules....my go to yeast, usually pitch around 62-64 degrees and let it chomp away.

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Old 03-20-2013, 12:45 PM   #8
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+1.

If you can control your temps to keep them low and consistent, Notty is excellent. It really shines when you can ferment with it at 55*F for a week, slowly bring it up into the low 60's another 10-14 days and then a D-rest at 68* for a couple of days. The result is very lager-like.

I'm drinking a Munich Dunkel right now in which I used Notty that way. It came out crisp and smooth. Next batch will be a mini-mash Maibock that will get the same low-temp, step-up Notty treatment (instead of the usual German lager/bock yeast). I'm very interested to see how that's going to turn out.
I like really clean yeast but I also love how Notty is a beast and rips through without issues and without fail. I find this temp in line with what I do...58 for 2-3 days, then let it ramp up to 64 to finish. Its really clean this way.
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Old 03-20-2013, 01:01 PM   #9
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I just made an Indian brown ale with notty a few weeks ago. I pitched at 70 degrees, then put it in a swamp cooler that I kept in the low 60's for 3 weeks. Am I going to get off flavors from pitching so high? I had a full fermentation, went from 1.072 to 1.012 in a week.

It tasted ok, a slight sour taste and smell, and a "hot" alcohol taste, but it was only in fermenter for 3 weeks. I bottled it and hopefully things will mellow out.

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