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-   -   Not your average carb question (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/not-your-average-carb-question-279500/)

Nick4228 11-07-2011 06:05 PM

Not your average carb question
 
I'm sorry if you all find this as a repeated question, but in all my searching i couldn't find a good answer. About 6 months ago I made a barleywine, started out about 1.200 ended up about 1.039 (I know a bit high... but i went with it...). Anyways, I tried some over the weekend, it tasted good, but was flat, no carbonation. I figure after 6 months is should be carbonated, so I'm assuming the yeast wasn't all that healthy, if living at all when I bottled. So I want to carbonate it. Assuming its never been carbonated, it's probably still primed, so can i just empty all the bottles into a bucket, add some dry yeast (beer or wine) and just rebottle it and carb it that way, or is there a better way to go about it?

Thanks ahead of time

dcHokie 11-07-2011 06:15 PM

Are you sure the SG/OG was 1.200?? That would put you in the range of a 21% ABV beer

Nick4228 11-07-2011 06:39 PM

Fat fingers and a smart phone don't mix....1.120... about 11%...

thood6 11-07-2011 06:46 PM

Im no expert but I would just make sure the yeast you pitch can handle the high alcohol level.

bomberman 11-07-2011 06:51 PM

Maybe just opening the bottles and dropping a small amount of yeast into each would be a better idea. six months sounds like a long time but I've heard that big beers often take that or longer to carb up.

Nick4228 11-07-2011 07:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bomberman
Maybe just opening the bottles and dropping a small amount of yeast into each would be a better idea. six months sounds like a long time but I've heard that big beers often take that or longer to carb up.

I thought of that as well, but it seems more difficult to be precise..."a small amount" doesn't seem exact enough... if I get it all in a bucket, I can see the total volume, then calculate how much yeast to use for the entire batch, mix it in, then divide it out again into bottles...

Ramitt 11-07-2011 08:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Nick4228 (Post 3464661)
I thought of that as well, but it seems more difficult to be precise..."a small amount" doesn't seem exact enough... if I get it all in a bucket, I can see the total volume, then calculate how much yeast to use for the entire batch, mix it in, then divide it out again into bottles...

Would not doing that risk oxidizing the beer?

remman4 11-07-2011 08:04 PM

yeah, I wouldn't try to transfer all of it to another container far too much work

I would either let it continue to sit as is or dose each bottle with a small amount of champagne yeast or other high alcohol tolerant yeast

or to do a real experiment you can try different approaches on a portion of the bottles and then report back which worked the best!

Revvy 11-07-2011 08:10 PM

rehydrate said yeast in water (or use liquid) in a sanitized container, get a children's medicine dropper with ML gradients like this,

http://www.ad-promotion-gift.com/upi...ropper-310.jpg

Sanitize it, open beer bottle, suck up slurry into sanitized eyedropper, squirt 1 ml of yeast into bottle, then re-cap. Give the bottles a shake, and then walk away for another 2-3 weeks to give that yeast a chance to do the job.

Is that "precise" enough for you?


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