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Old 11-06-2006, 11:53 PM   #1
BicycleMonkey
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Default no bubbles after 24 hours...

I just started my first batch yesterday and after 24 hours there are no bubble in the airlock. What do I need to do? If my yeast died, can I add another pack or do I have to start all over?

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Old 11-07-2006, 12:08 AM   #2
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Don't worry about it, my brew took almost two days to start up, and when it did, it was going crazy, give it some more time, but from what I've read and what others will tell you, is that it'll be ok.

RDWHAHB!!

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Old 11-07-2006, 12:15 AM   #3
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What temp did you pitch yeast at? Unless you pitched in excess of 100 degrees you probably didn't "kill" the yeast. They are hardy little guys.

My first brew I made and pitched without a starter didn't start for 36 hours. Hang out and relax.

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Old 11-07-2006, 12:19 AM   #4
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make sure it is in a warm spot. wrap a blanket around the bucket or carboy. and if you happen to have a heating pad, put it on the lowest setting and stick it underneath the bucket.

the winter weather may have left your yeast dorment because your house is too cold.

did you happen to aerate the wort. it could be inactive because of lack of oxygen also. a good way to aerate is to use a whisk on the wort before adding the yeast.

also, its good to have a backup pack of dry yeast incase you get an inactive ferment.

well I should get back to work. before I get into trouble. hope this info helps.

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Old 11-07-2006, 12:22 AM   #5
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I pitched the yeast at about 95 degrees. The book that came with my equipment kit said that I needed to bloom the yeast in warm water and the instructions that came with the ingredient kit I got from the homebrew store said to just add it to the wort. I figured that 95 would be blooming temperature so I went ahead and pitched it.

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Old 11-07-2006, 12:41 AM   #6
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95 is a bit warm (should pitch between 70-80), but probably shouldn't have killed the yeast. It just might be 'shocked' at this point; should come around IMO.

Keep an eye on it and hopefully it will start within another day.

If not and as a last resort, i'd consider repitching another packet and aerating the wort again; can't hurt if its not going to start and the wort should be down to pitching temps now.

I stress that you wait another day or so before taking this action. The yeast should come around.

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Old 11-07-2006, 12:47 AM   #7
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So if I don't have a wort chiller, how long is it safe to wait for the temp to get down to 70-80 degrees? The books and instructions I've read make it sound like if the wort hasn't cooled in like an hour bad bacteria will move in and ruin the batch.

Next time should I just pour the wort in the fermenter and cover it for several hours for the temp to reach 70-80 then reopen it to pitch the yeast?

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Old 11-07-2006, 12:56 AM   #8
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To chill the wort you can throw your brew pot in the sink filled with water and ice, just make sure you leave the lid on.

That'll cool it down pretty quickly.

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Old 11-07-2006, 01:25 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BicycleMonkey
So if I don't have a wort chiller, how long is it safe to wait for the temp to get down to 70-80 degrees? The books and instructions I've read make it sound like if the wort hasn't cooled in like an hour bad bacteria will move in and ruin the batch.

Next time should I just pour the wort in the fermenter and cover it for several hours for the temp to reach 70-80 then reopen it to pitch the yeast?
Your book sounds pretty extreme to me. I've heard of people leaving the wort in the garage, etc. for overnight until it cooled and it didn't ruin the batch. It definitely does increase the risk, but if you keep it covered you should be OK for a while. Again, not ideal, but possible.

I put my brewpot in the sink with 4" or so of cold water and about 10lb. of ice. I remove the lid and stir maybe every 5 mins until cool. Cools her down (2 gallon boils usually) in 15 mins or so. And I'm talking cooled down to 70-75. Last time I actually cooled the wort in the brewpot to 65 by accident. Of course it was back to 70ish after I added it to the room temp water in the fermenter.

Next time try that method...
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Old 11-07-2006, 01:49 PM   #10
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So how cool is too cool for the wort to be? If my room temp is about 66 or 67, will the yeast do it's thing?

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