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Old 06-29-2009, 04:57 PM   #1
Malric
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Default NG or propane indoors?

My electric stove doesn't produce a rolling boil. I'm interested in upgrading to a NG or propane burner, but that would be inconvenient in the winter. Is anyone using it indoors? I assume you need a ventilation system, but I'm not really sure where to begin research. Any advice?

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Old 06-29-2009, 05:28 PM   #2
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I brew nat gas in the garage and I know a few that do so in the basement but you definitely want to setup a good intake/exhaust system and make sure your burner runs really clean. Have you thought about running water heating elements in your vessels?

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Old 06-29-2009, 05:33 PM   #3
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I'm pretty sure no one (including me) is going to recommened using propane indoors.
but.... I do all the time (shhhh) when its 2 degrees outside.

I make sure I got good air circulation. never had the least bit of problem.

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Old 06-29-2009, 06:15 PM   #4
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It takes a certain amount of BTUs to boil your water. You can either do that slowly on a stove, or quickly on a Propane burner. Both are using approx the same amount of O2.

I would not do it, but you should be safe if you have enough ventilation and protect yourself from tipping that sucker over.

Some people even brew outside in the winter, by setting up a wind shield and maybe skipping the brewing on the coldest months.

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Old 06-29-2009, 10:42 PM   #5
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NG should be ok indoors (your stove top range doesn't asphyxiate you right?) but propane is a bad idea.

a vent hood is good security for fumes...but mostly for humidity. a full hour boil is gonna send a gallon or two of steam into your home, which can cause mildew, molding, wood/wallpaper damage, etc.

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Old 06-30-2009, 02:04 AM   #6
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Thanks for the feedback. Sounds like the safe route would be a heating element. I'm currently using a 5gal pot (brewster brown) that has a fairly thin body. Any recommendations for a conversion?

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Old 06-30-2009, 02:16 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malric View Post
Thanks for the feedback. Sounds like the safe route would be a heating element. I'm currently using a 5gal pot (brewster brown) that has a fairly thin body. Any recommendations for a conversion?

You may want to consider building one or two HEAT STICKS .

My WESTINGHOUSE BREWERY is powered solely with heatsticks in the basement. Nice and cool in the summer, toasty warm in the winter.

You may be able to supplement your kitchen range with a heatstick or two and keep brewing on the stovetop. Be certain your circuit is sized correctly, and contains a GFCI outlet.
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Old 06-30-2009, 03:06 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malkore View Post
NG should be ok indoors (your stove top range doesn't asphyxiate you right?) but propane is a bad idea.

a vent hood is good security for fumes...but mostly for humidity. a full hour boil is gonna send a gallon or two of steam into your home, which can cause mildew, molding, wood/wallpaper damage, etc.
Many people use propane stoves in the rural areas with no additional danger from fumes. The most likely cause for concern is lack of O2 from it being burned, and subsequent rise in CO2.
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Old 06-30-2009, 10:15 PM   #9
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Many people use propane stoves in the rural areas with no additional danger from fumes. The most likely cause for concern is lack of O2 from it being burned, and subsequent rise in CO2.
Good point. And RV's use propane for their stoves and heating too.

I wonder if lower pressure setups are used which keeps the levels of CO and O2 safe.

Oh, I did think of another reason: propane is heavier than air, while natural gas is lighter than air. If you had a leaking tank indoors and were using the burner, it would blanket the floor and then flash ignite. NG is supposedly safer because it rises and 'escapes' easier.
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Old 06-30-2009, 10:29 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eelpout View Post
I'm pretty sure no one (including me) is going to recommened using propane indoors.
but.... I do all the time (shhhh) when its 2 degrees outside.

I make sure I got good air circulation. never had the least bit of problem.
I use my Hurricane burner indoors all winter. It's not the CO I'm concerned about, it's starting a fire. I keep a fire extinguisher handy.

As far as the CO is concerned, our cooking stove runs on propane and is not ventilated. I run the ceiling fan while I brew and I crack a window, just in case.

I don't think the insurance company would be too thrilled about a claim involving an OUTDOOR cooking device. Hopefully, I'll never find out!
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