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Old 08-08-2012, 07:23 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by talani View Post
I noticed that my tap water is a little over 80 degrees.
What is your water source? Virtually all water come from underground, and would be around the 60 degree mark...are you letting it run long enough?

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Does this mean I cannot chill below 80 with the wort chiller?
Yes. You can not chill to any lower (temperature) than your cooling media.
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Old 08-08-2012, 07:29 PM   #32
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Water does not "soak up" heat. Your cooling rate is proportional to the temperature difference between the wort, and the water. If your water is exciting your chiller at wort temperature, that is very inefficient.

Why? Because that means that the water in the chiller near the exit is not transferring any heat out of the wort around it. The colder the water is at the exit, the more heat the wort is able to transfer into the water.

Flow as fast as possible for the quickest cooling, but as MalFet said, you may be able to cut water in half and not double cooling time if saving water is your goal.

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Old 08-08-2012, 08:53 PM   #33
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If your water is exciting your chiller at wort temperature, that is very inefficient.
I don't mean to be pedantic, but there are two types of efficiency being addressed here. Heat exchange efficiency, and water usage efficiency.

I don't disagree with anything you said though. I personally think you can easily quadruple your water useage and only increase your cooling time by 25% (disclaimer: these are just my real world observations, and not scientific in anyway) if you run the water too fast through the chiller.

I wonder, supposing what you said is true (I believe it is!) doesn't the inverse hold true for a prechiller setup? IE, the WARMER the water exiting your prechiller is, the LESS efficient your prechiller has been at exchanging the heat between your tap water (in the coil) and your ice water (in the bucket)?
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Old 08-08-2012, 09:09 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by jbaysurfer
I wonder, supposing what you said is true (I believe it is!) doesn't the inverse hold true for a prechiller setup? IE, the WARMER the water exiting your prechiller is, the LESS efficient your prechiller has been at exchanging the heat between your tap water (in the coil) and your ice water (in the bucket)?
That's correct. But it depends on how you measure efficiency, or more accurately what efficiency you want to maximize. With a pre chiller, you WANT the water exciting the pre chiller to be as cold as possible, thus slower moving water would be better because that water's measurable temperature would be lower. Your ice water will melt slower, but that's what you want. With your wort chiller, you want the wort to cool as fast as possible so you want as fast a flow as possible, which will result in less of a change in inlet/outlet water temperature.

Efficiency is probably a bad way to frame the discussion, as you pointed out. Define what you want (fast cooling, less water usage, etc) and then maximize your setup.
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Old 08-08-2012, 09:39 PM   #35
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I'm going to use a 50 ft 1/4 inch prechiller on my next brewday to try to get the water colder faster (water in the coil will have more surface area touching the ice bath) while using 3/8 for the IC.

Thoughts?

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Old 08-08-2012, 10:17 PM   #36
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This is what I am going to be doing soon.

Use the wort chiller until about 100 degrees. Then take a tub of ice water and pump it through the chiller

http://www.harborfreight.com/catalog...bmersible+pump

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Old 08-08-2012, 10:33 PM   #37
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Im in the same boat.
Options as I see it
1) build pre-chiller $25 copper coil and some tubing.
2) buy pump - harbor freight has them for $10 but unlike the pre-chiller it requires being plugged in to operate.
3) Try my budget wart chiller design I came up with but do not know if it would work $5

I was thinking to buy a small bucket, and cut 2 holes in it. The input hole would run tubing down to the bottom and use water from the faucet. The output hole have a much shorter piece of tubing would be located near the top. Fill the bucket with ice then turn on the faucet. Once it fills up, the water would be nice cold and it "should, might, maybe" push water through the tubing in the top of the bucket with the other end of the line attached to the chiller.

What do you guys think? Will it work? Am I being to cheap and I should just go buy a copper coil? I would imagine water in direct contact with ice would be even colder than using copper tubing but either should be efficient enough?

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Old 08-08-2012, 11:07 PM   #38
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^ I don't see how that's going to work unless you have the perfect amount of pressure going to the in tube so the water level doesn't just rise above the output hole and overrun the bucket. I think you'll end up ruining a bucket and still buying a coil chiller TBH.

And by the time you get the bulkhead fittings (or whatever you'll use for the imput/output ports and the hose clamps etc, you're way over 5 bucks.

Just my $.02, but I love ingenuity and DIY stuff, so please post it up if you decide to try it!!!

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Old 08-09-2012, 12:15 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbaysurfer View Post
^ I don't see how that's going to work unless you have the perfect amount of pressure going to the in tube so the water level doesn't just rise above the output hole and overrun the bucket. I think you'll end up ruining a bucket and still buying a coil chiller TBH.

And by the time you get the bulkhead fittings (or whatever you'll use for the imput/output ports and the hose clamps etc, you're way over 5 bucks.

Just my $.02, but I love ingenuity and DIY stuff, so please post it up if you decide to try it!!!
I should have been more clear, I would drill the holes into the bucket lid, I would think that would hold enough pressure but I'm not sure. Maybe just JBWELD the lines to the lid rather than buy bulkhead fittings etc?

Ok maybe I'm dreaming and should just be cheap and buy the pump.
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Old 08-09-2012, 12:39 AM   #40
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I admire all the ingenuity here, but I don't understand the trouble people go to to avoid buying a $12 pond pump (http://www.amazon.com/Hydrofarm-AAPW...ords=pond+pump). As they say in my neck of the woods, "cheap and best!"

(Of course, I often find myself over-engineering very simple problems, so I'm hardly one to criticize.)

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