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Old 08-07-2012, 04:23 PM   #11
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Before I bought mine. I did a test temp of both the kitchen sink and outdoor faucet. The outdoor faucet was much colder. Stands to reason as the house plumbing is going to be the same temp in the house. I was able to cool down to 65 in 15 min. I did add a ball valve to control the flow at the chiller. I felt it allowed the water enough time to absorb the heat.

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Old 08-07-2012, 05:19 PM   #12
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... I did add a ball valve to control the flow at the chiller. I felt it allowed the water enough time to absorb the heat.
water flow is important, you dont want it rushing through so fast that it doesnt have time to absorb the heat. I put my hose pressure just barely on so make sure the water has enough time to absorb and come out hot.
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Old 08-07-2012, 05:55 PM   #13
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"I did add a ball valve to control the flow at the chiller. I felt it allowed the water enough time to absorb the heat."

That isn't how thermodynamics work. You will get the fastest chill from passing the highest volume of cold water through the coil as you can. Reducing the flow through a single coil immersion chiller reduces the chill speed. The rate of heat transfer from the wort to the chill water is proportional to the temp difference between the 2. The closer you get in temp, the less heat is removed per minute.

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Old 08-07-2012, 08:33 PM   #14
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"I did add a ball valve to control the flow at the chiller. I felt it allowed the water enough time to absorb the heat."

That isn't how thermodynamics work. You will get the fastest chill from passing the highest volume of cold water through the coil as you can. Reducing the flow through a single coil immersion chiller reduces the chill speed. The rate of heat transfer from the wort to the chill water is proportional to the temp difference between the 2. The closer you get in temp, the less heat is removed per minute.
Well, it depends on what BronxBrew was trying to accomplish, right? Restricting the flow of water won't save you time, but it might save you water.
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Old 08-07-2012, 08:44 PM   #15
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Maybe I misunderstood, but it seemed like the implication was that reducing the flow allowed the water to absorb more heat and aided cooling the wort. That is the opposite of what actually happens.

If water conservation is a priority, then do what you have to do, but it will hurt your cooling rate.

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Old 08-07-2012, 09:06 PM   #16
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Maybe I misunderstood, but it seemed like the implication was that reducing the flow allowed the water to absorb more heat and aided cooling the wort. That is the opposite of what actually happens.

If water conservation is a priority, then do what you have to do, but it will hurt your cooling rate.
To some extent, but I can cut my water usage in half by increasing my chill time by 5%. Beyond a certain point, you're just wasting water.
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:13 PM   #17
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The difference was that on full blast. The water coming out was luke warm at best. dialing back the the flow. The water coming out was hotter. Not to mention the temp gage dropped faster. The thermo dynamics mentioned above is relative to what works on paper. Its right in theory to what it is relative to. I'm talking a large volume "Garden hose" going the 3/8 of copper tubing. Volume is displaced by pressure. It does give the water enough time to "soak up" the heat. "Sorry high school teacher in NYC".

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Old 08-07-2012, 09:19 PM   #18
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The difference was that on full blast. The water coming out was luke warm at best. dialing back the the flow. The water coming out was hotter. Not to mention the temp gage dropped faster. The thermo dynamics mentioned above is relative to what works on paper. Its right in theory to what it is relative to. I'm talking a large volume "Garden hose" going the 3/8 of copper tubing. Volume is displaced by pressure. It does give the water enough time to "soak up" the heat. "Sorry high school teacher in NYC".
It's not theory. Faster flow is always faster chilling. Don't let me stop whatever works for you, but I'll eat a goat's lung if you can prove that slower flow chills faster for you.
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:39 PM   #19
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A word of caution: don't expect a longer hose to do much. Vinyl is a relatively poor heat conductor. I'd be surprised if you gained more than a couple of degrees.
This. In fact, I think that's a waste of time personally. You can always boil some water to sanitize it then put it in a sanitized container and freeze it. Then adjust your OG of your boil and add the sanitized ice to your brew while you chill with the chiller.

But what I did before I got a prechiller (dirt cheap on amazon for a 25' chiller) was just stir stir stir in the opposite direction that the water is flowing through your coil chiller. I could get 5G batches cooled to pitch temp in 30 minutes that way. Now I recirc the wort with a pump while running the chiller and prechiller set up, and honestly, it takes me an hour to pitch...which, I've found, is just fine.

It's not your chiller that's not working well, its your expectations of what it would do for you that need adjustment
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Old 08-07-2012, 09:43 PM   #20
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I use a pre-chiller submerged in a bucket of ice water. It's a 20 foot coil of 3/8 copper tubing with some hose connectors. Paid about $20-$25 for it at Lowes.

I only need it July-August. I don't use it until my wort gets down below 90. It helps get the temp down that last 15 degrees. I can generally ge my wort to the mid 70s with a 7 lb bag of ice.

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