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Old 04-17-2012, 12:41 PM   #1
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Default Need Help With Priming Sugar Style

Morning all-

I'm going to be bottling a raspberry wheat today and just wanted to confirm the "style." I'm using the tastybrew bottle priming calculator:

http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html

Is my raspberry wheat a "Light Ale- American Wheat?"

I used S-05 if it makes a difference...

Jeff

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Old 04-17-2012, 01:07 PM   #2
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American Wheat Ale. Should need about 3.6 oz of table sugar to prime 5 gallons, I just bottled an AWA 2 weeks ago, going to try one tonight and see how the carbonation is coming along.

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Old 04-17-2012, 04:52 PM   #3
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Wow, that wasn't fun. Little pieces of raspberry clogged my bottling wand. I've read that you should use a hop bag around the autosiphon, but chose to ignore that idea...wrong move.

For the future, when you wrap the hop bag around the autosiphon, how do you do it? With a twist-tie? Do you use a rubber band? Sanitized obviously...

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Old 04-17-2012, 06:20 PM   #4
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I use my grain bag which is large enough that only part of the bag goes into the fermenter but I had thought of using a smaller hop bag with sanitized rubber band and don't see any reason why that wouldn't work well.

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Old 04-17-2012, 06:25 PM   #5
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It's too late now, but I really dislike those priming calculators because they simply aren't correct. Carbing "to style" sounds great in theory, but usually ends up with over carbed bottled beers, or undercarbed flat beers. It's true that some British styles served on cask ARE flat, but bottled beer generally shouldn't be.

I typically use 5 ounces (by weight) of priming sugar for 5 gallons of beer for almost all styles. For something I want a little lower carbed, I will use 4 ounces of priming sugar, but never less.

Using that calculator, carbing a Bavarian dunkelweizen will cause bottle bombs. And carbing a Northern English brown will give you flat beer. Both would be ridiculous.

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Old 04-17-2012, 06:33 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffoC6 View Post
Wow, that wasn't fun. Little pieces of raspberry clogged my bottling wand. I've read that you should use a hop bag around the autosiphon, but chose to ignore that idea...wrong move.

For the future, when you wrap the hop bag around the autosiphon, how do you do it? With a twist-tie? Do you use a rubber band? Sanitized obviously...
Did you rack to a "bottling bucket"?

If not, racking to a bottling bucket will allow you to easily "bulk prime" your beer and racking your beer onto the priming sugar solution can mix the beer or you can gently stir the beer before you bottle!

Bulk priming can help your beers to be consistantly carbonated! Another benefit is by racking to a bottling bucket you can siphon the beer off of most of the trub at the bottom of your fermentor.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
It's too late now, but I really dislike those priming calculators because they simply aren't correct. Carbing "to style" sounds great in theory, but usually ends up with over carbed bottled beers, or undercarbed flat beers. It's true that some British styles served on cask ARE flat, but bottled beer generally shouldn't be.

I typically use 5 ounces (by weight) of priming sugar for 5 gallons of beer for almost all styles. For something I want a little lower carbed, I will use 4 ounces of priming sugar, but never less.

Using that calculator, carbing a Bavarian dunkelweizen will cause bottle bombs. And carbing a Northern English brown will give you flat beer. Both would be ridiculous.
What have you found is the best way to determine priming sugar? Are you basing it on FG? ABV? Seems most beers do fine with 3-5oz of sugar in 5 gallons.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:37 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Jayhem View Post
What have you found is the best way to determine priming sugar? Are you basing it on FG? ABV? Seems most beers do fine with 3-5oz of sugar in 5 gallons.
What am I basing it on? Just preference to have a carb level similar to most commercial beers. Even English beers that are bottled aren't flat, while cask ales certainly have a very low carb level. Priming a weizen to 4.5 volumes of co2 may create gushers or even bottle bombs.

A small variation in carb levels is fine for me. I normally prime a dry stout with 4 ounces while an American IPA may get 5 ounces. But going higher or lower has never worked out for me.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:42 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
It's too late now, but I really dislike those priming calculators because they simply aren't correct. Carbing "to style" sounds great in theory, but usually ends up with over carbed bottled beers, or undercarbed flat beers. It's true that some British styles served on cask ARE flat, but bottled beer generally shouldn't be.

I typically use 5 ounces (by weight) of priming sugar for 5 gallons of beer for almost all styles. For something I want a little lower carbed, I will use 4 ounces of priming sugar, but never less.

Using that calculator, carbing a Bavarian dunkelweizen will cause bottle bombs. And carbing a Northern English brown will give you flat beer. Both would be ridiculous.
I try to carb to style, and I know the temperature function in those is important if you don't degass. That said, a bitter I just made should have been carbed to .75 volumes, and that required .1 oz for a 2 gallon batch at my ferm temps. I bumped it up to 1.75, which required 1 oz. Just take the calculator with a grain of salt, and if you want easy, just do everything to 2.25 volumes or so.
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Old 04-17-2012, 06:50 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
What am I basing it on? Just preference to have a carb level similar to most commercial beers. Even English beers that are bottled aren't flat, while cask ales certainly have a very low carb level. Priming a weizen to 4.5 volumes of co2 may create gushers or even bottle bombs.

A small variation in carb levels is fine for me. I normally prime a dry stout with 4 ounces while an American IPA may get 5 ounces. But going higher or lower has never worked out for me.
Oh ok, it sounded like you were saying that the same weight of priming sugar might create gushers in one style but leave another style flat.

I'm a bit worried about my IPA now...I just bottled it Sunday night using only 3.0 oz of table sugar in 4.7 gallons of beer.
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