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Old 12-30-2012, 05:31 PM   #1
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Default Need help making 1st Starter

Hello all,

I just ordered my second brew kit, I currently have caribou slobber in my primary. I'm racking it to my secondary next wee to make room for my second kit T-can & Bearcats Wheaten Beatdown. I wanted to get another quicker batch going in the primary that will bottle at roughly the same time as the caribou slobber in order to begin my rotation. My issue is that I have never used the liquid yeast Wyeast, and I'm concerned about learning to make a yeast starter. I ordered the Wyeast upgrade not realizing it was a liquid yeast upgrade. Can I pitch the liquid yeast just as I did the dry yeast? I'm very happy with how my first batch fermented and.thedry....yeastyeast,yeastnow it's time to learn a new

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Old 12-30-2012, 05:38 PM   #2
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You can just pitch it in but making a starter is better and easy to do. Just get an erlenmeyer flask from ur LHBS but u don't have to have one. Boil 1000 ml of water and then add 100 grams of DME to it. Then pour into the flask or a sanitized water jug and give it a quick ice bath. When its cooled pour the yeast in and shake the flask whenever u walk by it. After about 24-36 hours stick it in the fridge let all the yeast settle out an then pour out the wort keeping the yeast in the flask. Next make ur beer and pour the yeast starter in when finished.

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Old 12-30-2012, 05:42 PM   #3
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I always use the liquid yeast. If I'm pitching to a 5 gallon batch I don't make a starter. If I'm pitching to a 10 gallon batch I'll boil 2.5 cups of water, add 2 oz of DME, cool and add the yeast at least 24 hours prior to brewing. Make sure you shake the yeast in really well and get a lot of foam to be sure the wort is aerated. Cover with aluminum foil and don't mess with an airlock. You want O2 for the yeast to multiply. From what I've read, the usual formula of 2 cups water to 4 oz DME is just too concentrated and works against yeast growth.

I never bother cold crashing and decanting the wort off the yeast. I just don't see the point.

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Old 12-30-2012, 05:47 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frogmanx82 View Post
I always use the liquid yeast. If I'm pitching to a 5 gallon batch I don't make a starter. If I'm pitching to a 10 gallon batch I'll boil 2.5 cups of water, add 2 oz of DME, cool and add the yeast at least 24 hours prior to brewing. Make sure you shake the yeast in really well and get a lot of foam to be sure the wort is aerated. Cover with aluminum foil and don't mess with an airlock. You want O2 for the yeast to multiply. From what I've read, the usual formula of 2 cups water to 4 oz DME is just too concentrated and works against yeast growth.

I never bother cold crashing and decanting the wort off the yeast. I just don't see the point.
Neither do I but sometimes When making a big starter (2L) for a high gravity beer it just seems like so much extra liquid. But I do it anyway no time to cold crash!
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Old 12-30-2012, 05:48 PM   #5
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I don't make starters.. but I probably should... but what I did is I just left my smack pack on the counter (smacked) overnight. Worked great for my english bitter. But what you will hrre from all of the senior brewers is do the yeast starter. It ferments faster, cleaner, and healthier. Less off flavors from yeast.

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Old 12-30-2012, 05:50 PM   #6
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You make it sound easy, and it probably is once u get used to the process. Do I need to purchase a scale and graduated cylinder for getting the amounts correct, or can I just purchase what I need. The yeast that remains in the beaker after you pour off the wort is in a thick liquid form that can be poured into the carboy? Do I have to worry about it running down the neck of the carboy, or should I try to pour it right onto the wort? BTW thank you for your initial response

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- Zesty Pale Ale in primary #1
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- Belgian Wheat IPA in primary #3
- White IPA on deck
- ESB on deck

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Old 12-30-2012, 06:10 PM   #7
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Thank you all for your input, any, and all advice is greatly appreciated. FYI I am brewing only 5 gal. Batches at this time, so maybe I won't need a starter this time around, but I would still love to learn how without ruining my next batch. Also, the caribou slobber seems to have a slight smell of green apples or something, it was worse during the beginning of fermentation, but has faded a lot, I'm one week into fermentation now but there is still some of that smell. I'm concerned as the first days of fermentation were very active and I almost had a blow off situation as I had the carboy on the concrete floor of my furnace room. Realizing that the Kroisen was climbing the carboy quickly I moved the carboy to a cooler part of the basement to help prevent the blow off from happening. Once fermentation slowed I moved it back to the warmer room as it seemed that fermentation may have slowed too much. In the furnace room the carboy temp reads 67-68 degrees, where as when I moved to the cooler side of the basement my temp readings were about 62-64 degrees.

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" life is like a case of beer, you must enjoy it every day"

- ToastedBlonde Ale in Bottles
- Zesty Pale Ale in primary #1
- Belma 60 IPA in primary #2
- Belgian Wheat IPA in primary #3
- White IPA on deck
- ESB on deck

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Old 12-30-2012, 06:14 PM   #8
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When pouring the starter into ur Carboy u leave enough wort on top of the yeast so that u can shake the flask up mixing the yeast cake and them pour it into ur Carboy. I was scared on my first one too but it's so easy kinda like making a mini beer. Here is a simple pic I got from this site on how to make a starter.

image-1168101804.jpg  
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Old 12-30-2012, 06:17 PM   #9
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After chilling leave about an inch of wort in the flask shake up the wort and yeast and pour into Carboy using a funnel. If you don't have a scale u should get one as u progress u r gonna want to make the same recipes over and over again. I have a simple digital scale from the cooking section at Walmart. It helps a lot going by weight is more exact then using volumes.

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Old 12-30-2012, 06:20 PM   #10
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I use starters on my 5 gallon batches, I love having the fermentation done in half the time. I use the John Palmer recipe of 2 cups water to 1/2 cup DME, boil it, pitch it and the yeast into my flask on the stir plate, let it spin for roughly 2 1/2 days, and it works like a charm.

Personally, I would get a blow-off tube before I started moving my carboy around on a concrete floor. They're messy when they break.

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