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Old 08-30-2012, 04:09 AM   #21
fosgate
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Originally Posted by TopherM View Post
He's actually exactly correct that this is the proper traditional german pour. You are supposed to have about three fingers of head to let the beer breathe and bring out the yeast banana/clove character in the aroma!
Dudes got some really fat fingers if that is a 3 finger pour. This is how we always saw the German bartenders pour.

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I don't know about the hefe, but any school that requires you to take brewery science for a business managment degree is freakin' awesome!
I know right. University of Nebraska at Kearney (UNK) saying among students is you can't spell drunk without UNK! They have some requirements to make extra money off students. The first two years you have to choose what they call a "portal" class. They are designed that you pick a 188 level class in another field IE history majors look at art etc. They make the classes a bit more fun some make the BS class more than what it is. I chose American Culture in Cinema in which the professor thought is was total BS also so we just reviewed the minimum requirements and watched movies while eating popcorn once a week then wrote a one page loosely graded term paper.

This one you have to take the last two years of undergraduate for what they call a Capstone (Capstone Insurance sponsors) and you have to choose one of the same types of classes. I saw this one right away and went flashed my ID and had to get approval with the Dept Chair. Only 15 slots open for students and five professors teach it. Couple are biochemists, one is a history prof, a physics prof and a psychology prof. Good class, lots of stuff presented with the history of beer making, chemistry, physio and psychological effects, (serious science stuff ). Brew a batch every Thursday during a 5-6hr lab and we taste other types of beer. Have to record all data and tastes in a lab manual and turn it in. Everyone has to blow under .04 before we leave. Usually cut us off the last hour and lots of chatting for that time. Really fun and interesting class.
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Old 09-17-2012, 08:20 PM   #22
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Wow I can't believe UNK has a Brewing class! I went to UNL and UNO and we sure didn't have anything like that 8 years ago. Good luck on the hefe. Keep the posts on the class coming. I'm interested to see how it goes for someone without much brewing experience. It sounds fairly intense for a beginner.

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Old 09-19-2012, 05:22 AM   #23
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We've had three students drop from the class as it get's more intense into the mathematics of beer design. The number of equations to know and the various acronyms has me dreaming math at night. One of the professors brought in a bottle of Russian Imperial Stout that he brewed in 2008. Probably one of the best beers I have tasted and I now see why guys put forth the effort and time into brewing a beer that takes so long to ferment. Also tried a couple IPA beers, India and Mercenry that both held my mouth hostage with the power hops taste. (not for me). We advise the beer we are choosing today (Wednesday) and present an argument on 10/3 for our choice. We also bottle our second brew of Black Ale on Thursday and taste some more beer. Bottled out first batch last Thursday and thou a disappointing predicted alcohol content of 3% it should still be tasty. Think we were better on our efficiency with the Black Ale as that one should turn out to be 6%ABV. Strange thing I found about these guys is the wort chiller. Most I see sold online etc run water through the coil and drop the coil into the wort. One of the prof's that taught the sanitation and chemistry portions advised against this as they said it increases the chance of contamination of the wort and aerates the wort when people repeatedly dunk it. They just clean and sanitize the inside of the coil, submerge it in the round coolers with an ice bath and run the wort through it like an old cold plate. With only about 10-15ft of copper coil and constantly stirring the ice bath we were getting our wort chilled down to 20C (68f) with a single pass. We have to get more efficient with our sparging though. The first batch we lost 10 degrees of temp by the time we got our all of our extra sparge water in. This watered down the batch considerably. The second batch we continuously kept our sparge water on a high temp flame when not pouring to make up for heat loss. This last batch of Black Ale we nailed the target SG of 1.054. Not bad for all grain brewing with less than $100 setup per station. The profs have way better setups at home but they show it can be done on a budget.

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Old 10-14-2012, 12:54 AM   #24
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Well, brewed a 2 1/2 gallon batch for our project. We have been struggling to meet our Target SG with our batches and been trying to eliminated inefficiencies. Thought a while that we were just catching too much sparge water after the last one because all said and done we had nearly 3 gallons bottled for a 2 1/2 batch after all the stuff left in the kettle, fermentation bucket etc. Preboil we were at 31 and normally we pickup about 19 on our boil so we didn't worry. But then we realized our preboil volume was 2.45gal and had just tossed our grain. We boiled off a half a gallon and post boil wound up being only 43. Target was 51. Nuts! After assessing we concluded during our 75min mash with checks at T-30,T-60 and T-75 that we were on average of loosing 6 degrees Celsius every 30min being the main cause of our low SG. And the worse part of this is then we are probably not maintaining a high enough temp to draw out some of the tannins the style is known for to achieve that tart refreshing finish. Anyway I think we were efficient as we could have been with the equipment to the recipe. Hopefully it won't be a fatal mistake that we didn't just add another pound of grain.

That was Thursday. We walked into the lab and saw the foam bubbling up through the airlock of the 5gal pail. Wound up having to pull the airlock off and insert tubing into the top and the other end into a beaker half filled with water. Standing next to the pail you could smell the banana scent! Anyway, got a couple weeks for it to ferment, then bottle and presentation and tasting is the first week of December.

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Old 10-26-2012, 03:50 AM   #25
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Just bottled it today. Sugars were all used up and lots of yeast on the bottom. Figuring a final ABV of 4.9% and found we were the only one who had a bad cooler that only gave us a 45% efficiency!! Oh well, I chose to do this one due to the amount of leeway others mentioned in the recipe so hopefully it tastes fine for our tasting in five weeks.

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Old 10-26-2012, 05:46 AM   #26
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Are you an extract or all grain brewer?

I can give you an A+ traditional bavarian hefeweizen recipe that is incredibly easy to brew. I would almost urge you to NOT try to make a clone. Clone beer making is often trial and error, and your first attempt to clone a particular commercial example likely will not taste like the commercial example.

I LOVEEE Hefewiezens because the basic recipe produces a fresh, clean, easily-repeatable beer.

Let me know if you are extract or all-grain, and I'll give you a can't miss recipe that will likely be much better than any clone attempt.
I just bottled my first hef 2 weeks ago, but I would love to see an extract recipe that a hef fan vouches for! There's always time for another batch...
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Old 12-06-2012, 04:02 PM   #27
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So, off the top of my head, it's been around 5 weeks if not more. How did this hefe turn out for you?

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Old 12-06-2012, 06:01 PM   #28
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Just tasted it yesterday and going to present it at a tasting in about an hour.

Target OG 1.043
Target FG 1.008, 1.014
ABV: 4.6%
IBU's Failed experimient reading
SRM 7.2

Recipe efficiency 70%
51*100/70=72.8 or 1.073 is 100% recipe efficiency,
Acutal Efficiency=43/73=59% effciency.

Target OG: Past experiments showed we were loosing 10 degrees or more in removing water from the burner and pouring it over the grains during our 30min interval temperature checks on our mash. This resulted in too much water in the mash and to counter we figure out to turn the burner on high an return the pot to the flame immediately when not pouring to maintain heat and lessen the amount of water in the mash. With this learned we figured we could easily hit 70% efficiency with our mash. What we did not predict was to pull a different cooler with a far greater amount of heat loss. Prior mash tun lost only 3 °C trying to maintain a lower temperature. We pulled a different mash tun than we had used in the past that would loos on average 6°C every 30 minutes that greatly reduced our efficincy. We attempted to counter or reduce this negative outcome by reducing the amount of wort yield from our mash. We targeted a 2.5 gallon batch initially but reduced our pre boil volume to 2.5 gallon and boiled off a half gallon for a total yield of 2 gallons.

During bottling we did not loose very much beer to transfer loss due to not having to avoid siphoning yeast from the bottom of the fermenter. We were able to maintain nearly two gallons due to this.

Target FG: We have two numbers here because we measure both with a hydrometer and a refractometer. Due to the presence of alcohol we achieve a false low of 1.008 with the hydrometer and a false high of 1.014 with the refractometer. This should mean we are right in range with the 1.011 Target FG of the style.

%ABV: Even though our OG was lower than predicted, our ABV turned out to be 4.6% which is still within the parameters of the style.

SRM: The SRM value was a little higher than the recipe predicted and higher than the style guidelines, this is probably a result of the reduced volume of final product.

Upon tasting we believe we are within the style however due to our low efficiency we missed a bit of the body and it seems a bit watered down or missing the bread balance. But overall still a tasty beer.

So in the end just DWRHAHB!

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Old 12-06-2012, 06:31 PM   #29
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Have you tried Sierra Nevadas Kellerwies? My favorite by far! I read in a post on this forum (srry no link..but sure you could search for it) that they use an OPEN fermentation style that promotes high esters for a more pronounced flavor...
They mention that right on their site:

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Originally Posted by sierranevadawebsite
Kellerweis is one of the only American Hefeweizens made using the traditional Bavarian style of open fermentation. This difficult and labor-intensive technique adds uncommon depth and flavor complexity. Our hazy-golden hefeweizen is deeply flavorful, refreshing and perfect for a sunny day. To serve, pour two-thirds into a glass, swirl and pour the rest.
I am also a fan of the Kellerweis and would like to try recreating it at some point down the road.
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:30 PM   #30
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Presentation went well. We showed off first since we had the lightest style and was the only one that everyone in the room drank all of what was served them. The ending of the last presentation was kind of funny. They were presenting I believe a Scottish Stout. They kept pronouncing Edinburgh like Edenburg. At the question an answer session at the end when they asked for questions we all froze as we heard a thick Scottish accent from the back of the room. "If you continue to brew Scottish beers in the future do us a favor and learn to properly pronounce the capital of Scottland as Edinburgh and not Edenburg."

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