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Old 08-25-2012, 02:40 AM   #11
fosgate
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Spoke with a couple of the Professors about grain vs. extract. One was telling me that the grain gets a nicer more robust flavor over using extract exclusively usually, but he will often throw a bit of extract in to up the alcohol content. For some of the equipment From what I can tell we Have about a 6-8ft section of copper pipe rolled into about a foot and a half tall coil to cool the brew as it passes through our makeshift cold plate. We have round ice coolers which I am assuming are going to get filled with ice and the coils will sit in there loaded with ice water and salt. Large Glass containers for fermentation.

The Lab. Equipment is just laying around as we prep to clean it. One table has bags of ingredients for a Pale Ale we will be brewing on Wednesday (my classes first).


Here are the water tables I was talking about. We will start with distilled water and add the chemical components for the region we want to shoot for. There are only 15 students for the five professors in the class. About half are bio chem majors or pre-med. I'm a business management major with a minor in public health thus this class meets one of my requirements. Anyway I'm paired with a premed student and I'm the one with mathematics and Biology so between the two of us we should be able to make something tasty.

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Old 08-25-2012, 03:06 AM   #12
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I am fermenting my first hw with Sierra Nevadas Kellerwies yeast and the 'Simple Hefeweizen' recipe. A perfect first step to hefeweizen. I have limited access but I have loved the taste of flying dog and paulaner hefeweizen.

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Old 08-25-2012, 03:11 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fosgate View Post
but he will often throw a bit of extract in to up the alcohol content.
Great post but upping the alcohol content of a hefeweizen makes no sense at all. It's juvenile imo.... then again I prefer low ABV brew unless the beer TRULY benefits from a higher ABV.
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Old 08-25-2012, 03:15 AM   #14
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drinking a good hefe now, and has been 1 of my favorite styles for years. 6 lbs wheat, 4 lbs pils, .5 lbs rice hulls, 14 ibu of hallertau, mittelfrueh, or hersbrucker, and 3068 yeast

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Old 08-25-2012, 07:51 PM   #15
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Maybe some of you can help me with this dilemma. I'm trying to make this as an authentic experience as possible. I plan on using this as a template for my labels to go on the bottle. Yet I am confused as to what I Should write on the bottle. In Germany they usually have something not only written how it was brewed in accordance to the German Purity Law but how it is brewed in traditions. Other breweries have a poem or story written on their bottles. One of the things I find though in the market here in America is that a vast majority of Americans don't know how to serve a good Hefeweizen. For example I see Paulaner sold in the small 12oz bottles and cans! How are you supposed to properly serve the beer? I believe it should only come from a traditional bottle and be served in the traditional hefeweizen glass. I think many make the mistake of trying a hefeweizen and drink it straight from the bottle or slow pour it in small amounts at a time and pitch the bottle with most of the yeast still at the bottom of the bottle. Others may try the "traditional" lemon which really isn't in the Hefe but often served in the Krystalweisse instead. (I lived in Germany long enough to be called a ***** by my German friends for ordering a Kristallveise with a lemon and then to hear gasps as I tried to add a lemon to hefeweizen.) Anyway I'm trying to think of how to word more of an instruction manual how it comes in the traditional bottle and should be served fresh as possible in the traditional Hefeweizen glass with no garnish. More of an instruction manual. Any Ideas?

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Old 08-25-2012, 09:32 PM   #16
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I believe it should only come from a traditional bottle and be served in the traditional hefeweizen glass.
Interesting. I always drink hefeweizen in my oversized 'I love my cat' mug. I don't have a cat by the way but the mug is pretty cool.
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Old 08-27-2012, 01:26 AM   #17
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I had wondered for some time why different beers were always served in different glasses when I was stationed in Germany.

http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-pour-hefeweizen
http://www.beerwrangler.com/the-beer-glass-guide/

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Old 08-29-2012, 03:01 AM   #18
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This is what rubs me. A so called pro incorrectly showing people how to pour a hefe. With head like that he must be planning on drinking it sometime outside of an hour from the pour.

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Old 08-29-2012, 05:49 PM   #19
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He's actually exactly correct that this is the proper traditional german pour. You are supposed to have about three fingers of head to let the beer breathe and bring out the yeast banana/clove character in the aroma!

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Old 08-30-2012, 12:27 AM   #20
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I don't know about the hefe, but any school that requires you to take brewery science for a business managment degree is freakin' awesome!

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