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Old 11-25-2012, 12:44 AM   #1
Boydo
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Hi all. So I need some help in determining how my latest batch was a fail.
This is only my third brew batch so I am still learning.
Out of the three done so far I have only had success with one and that was a Coopers Real Ale ( yeast was the std yeast that comes with the beer kit ). I have been using the Coopers beer kits with the Coopers Carbonation Drops.
I decided for my third and most recent batch that I would experiment with a different type of yeast instead of the std sachet that comes in the beer kit.
So I decided to try the Fermentis dry lager yeast Saflager s-23 which has a temperature range of 11-24 degrees Celsius and an ideal temp of 11-15 deg Celsius. At the time of typing this I realize where I went wrong but just wanted to make sure I right in thinking so.
I kept the temp at a average of 22-24 degrees and in primary fermentation for 7 days. Did I have the temperature to high? If yes then can this lead to an infection or non fermentation. The batch is very pale and looks more like Hoegaarden. It looks more yellow than golden and it has a hazines to it also that is not consistent with lager. Also it does not taste like lager, it is not sour which is why I am wondering if it's infected or not. However it does not taste right. Am I right in thinking the temp was way to high and next tome I should stick to the ideal temp? Thanks for the time, apologies fo the essay.

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Old 11-25-2012, 01:13 AM   #2
Leithoa
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Might I suggest the BYO Lager Article

I realize that the 'ideal' fermentation temperatures given are just suggestions but nearly 10 degrees(celcius no less) over the suggested range is what did you in. What makes a lager a lager is the long prolonged fermentation temperature. Most commercial lagers are fermented below 40F(4C). You can start out around 60F(15.5C) for a day or so to get cell counts up but generally cooler fermentations with lager yeast are better.

High temperature in and of itself doesn't yeild to infections. Those are only caused by poor sanitation practices. High temperatures can however keep yeasts from being able to reporduce fast enough to bully down any other bacteria that made their way into the wort.

The reason your beer doesn't taste like the lagers you are familar with is indeed the high fermentation temperatures. When yeast are strained(high OG, high temps, or low pitching cell count) they produce off flavors. The temperature range given by safale is the temperature range that the yeast will give the flavor profile in each strains description. In general the closer you are to the high end of that range the more phenols, esters, and other compounds are generated. It is these compounds that give off flavors. The haziness is likely due to the short fermentation time, there are still yeast in suspension. Lagers can't be rushed and can sometimes take months to finish fermentation. As to the disagreement in color, that is determined by the grain bill, which isn't mentioned. Lagers are typically made up of pilsner malt and depending on light/regular up to 40% corn/rice/adjuncts(ie; grains not barley). So depending on what kit you modified that could be the main factor as to why the color didn't turn out.

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Old 11-25-2012, 01:23 AM   #3
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Fermentation temperature control is critical, especially with Lager yeast. Keeping fermentation in the lower half of the "recommended" range is one of the single most important things you can do to produce better beer. In general, most yeasts will ferment "cleaner" (less phenols, less esters, less "off" flavors) when fermented cooler. If you want to brew lagers, then I suggest getting a fridge with a temp controller, or google "son of a fermentation chiller" for a less-expensive way to keep the beer cool during fermentation.

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Old 11-25-2012, 01:38 AM   #4
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Thank you guys, I had a feeling that is where I went wrong. Next lager will hopefully turn better with a more adequate temperature

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