Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > is my beer 'green' or is my aftertaste from too-high temps during fermentation?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-06-2013, 06:17 PM   #1
judasBrews
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 1
Default is my beer 'green' or is my aftertaste from too-high temps during fermentation?

I just tried a bottle of a peach IPA that had been bottle conditioning for 3 weeks. It has a strong alcoholic aftertaste which I am guessing is the fusel taste? The yeast I used is "SAFALE US-05 DRY AMERICAN ALE YEAST" I'm not sure if just needs to condition a little longer, or if it is from too-high fermentation temps. I've brewed 4 batches before, and never had to worry about it being too warm because I lived in a basement apartment and it was always cool... but now I'm up on the fourth floor and while the apartment is generally around 73 degrees, it may have gotten up above 75 from time to time during the fermentation. i'm not sure what a 'green' beer tastes like, or what it tastes like if the beer is not finished bottle conditioning yet, so I 'm not sure if that is all the taste is. It's well carbonated, and tastes delicious except for the burny afteraste.

Thanks!
M

__________________
judasBrews is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2013, 06:38 PM   #2
kombat
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,903
Liked 769 Times on 501 Posts
Likes Given: 671

Default

Yep, sounds like the classic description of fusel alcohols resulting from too-high fermentation temperatures. Unfortunately, it's too late for this batch, but the prescription for future batches is to pick up a plastic "rope tub" (usually for laundry) from the department store (maybe $7-$10) and set the carboy in a water bath, possibly with some frozen juice/pop bottles to get those temperatures down next time.

__________________
kombat is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2013, 06:41 PM   #3
woozy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,283
Liked 130 Times on 109 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Too high temps.

They might mellow out a little with time though.

__________________

Once it's determined that Bob's Net Works makes fishing equipment there's really no point discussing why nylon woven rope is not a good choice for the router and server needs of your online presence.

woozy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2013, 07:27 PM   #4
NordeastBrewer77
NBA Playa
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 7 reviews
 
NordeastBrewer77's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Posts: 7,933
Liked 1075 Times on 783 Posts
Likes Given: 3977

Default

I second the high temps; 75º ambient means your beer was likely over 80º during peak fermentation. That's warm enough to create a number of off flavors including the hot alcohol you describe.

__________________
The Polk Street Brewery

Brewin' 'n' Que'n - YouTube Shenanigans

Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
can i drink this? I mean. Im gunna. But is it fine?
Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
it's not a barley wine. it's an ale.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlebomber View Post
Have you seen the price of ketchup lately? And I'm not talking Heinz.
NordeastBrewer77 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2013, 07:35 PM   #5
aiptasia
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Them Scary Woods, FL
Posts: 3,519
Liked 531 Times on 469 Posts
Likes Given: 162

Default

Young beers often have green apple and other odd fruit flavors. Letting your beer sit a little longer on the yeast cake can help with fusel alcohols and other hot solvent, green and "off" flavors from young beer. Basically, you give the finished beer what's commonly known as a diacetyl rest. That is, the beer sits for an extra week in the primary fermenter so that yeasts can consume and transform earlier alcohol precursors and fusels into more pleasant esters. So, after your beers are finished fermenting (through the use of consecutive gravity readings), there's no harm and all the benefit in the world from letting it sit for an extra week on the yeast cake in the primary.

__________________
Paranormal Brewing
Beer so good, it's frightening.

2014: Seven Heavens Series One: Vilon, Mystic Melomel, Skeeter Pee.
aiptasia is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2013, 07:41 PM   #6
NordeastBrewer77
NBA Playa
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 7 reviews
 
NordeastBrewer77's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Posts: 7,933
Liked 1075 Times on 783 Posts
Likes Given: 3977

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by aiptasia View Post
Young beers often have green apple and other odd fruit flavors. Letting your beer sit a little longer on the yeast cake can help with fusel alcohols and other hot solvent, green and "off" flavors from young beer. Basically, you give the finished beer what's commonly known as a diacetyl rest. That is, the beer sits for an extra week in the primary fermenter so that yeasts can consume and transform earlier alcohol precursors and fusels into more pleasant esters. So, after your beers are finished fermenting (through the use of consecutive gravity readings), there's no harm and all the benefit in the world from letting it sit for an extra week on the yeast cake in the primary.
Ok ok, first off, conditioning time will not eliminate fusel alcohol. Or solvent-y flavors. Second off, a diacetyl rest cannot be done in a "finished" beer, it needs to be done in a beer where the yeast is still active. It's commonly done about 75-85% of the way through fermentation.

I agree that time on the cake after FG can help smooth a beer out to some extent, but your advice is pretty misleading.
__________________
The Polk Street Brewery

Brewin' 'n' Que'n - YouTube Shenanigans

Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
can i drink this? I mean. Im gunna. But is it fine?
Quote:
Originally Posted by yeoitsmatt View Post
it's not a barley wine. it's an ale.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlebomber View Post
Have you seen the price of ketchup lately? And I'm not talking Heinz.
NordeastBrewer77 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Green Beer, Tap Water, Fermentation Temps s1911 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 19 06-18-2013 01:50 PM
High temps during fermentation streetbs Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 09-03-2011 07:40 AM
24 hrs. of high fermentation temps Nugent Fermentation & Yeast 1 04-20-2010 06:51 AM
green tea aftertaste? ekjohns All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 07-06-2009 03:04 PM
Green Beer: Cold Temps OK? Blue_Water General Beer Discussion 4 01-23-2009 03:21 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS